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I have tortoiseSVN installed alongside subversion for windows (not using TortoiseSVN command client tools because of restrictive purposes). I have a batch file that runs an svn update on certain folders which are used as environmental variables in Windows. Is it possible to svn update a folder using just the folder name?

e.g. from this:

cd C:\foo\johnsmith\testing\
svn update

to something like this?

cd testing\
svn update

I should add that environmental variables are new to me... With regards to Alrocs comment, the path C:\foo\johnsmith\testing\ is in the system environmental variable "Path".

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There are no environment variables in your examples. I only see an assumption about the current directory in the second. –  alroc Jun 3 at 13:26
    
@alroc, does the extra detail help? –  AMcNall Jun 3 at 13:37
    
I think you don't understand how environment variables (and especially that one) are meant to work. –  alroc Jun 3 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can't cd to directory, which is part of your $PATH$. But you can use environment variable, which explicitly contain needed path only (after all - variable is just string)

c:\TEMP>echo "%USERPROFILE%"
"C:\Documents and Settings\Badger"

c:\TEMP>cd "%USERPROFILE%"

C:\Documents and Settings\Badger>
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This is great, using this I managed to create a workaround, thanks –  AMcNall Jun 4 at 9:55

Never assume anything about environment variables that you haven't set via your batch file. Just because it's there today/on your computer doesn't necessarily mean it'll be there tomorrow or on another computer.

But you aren't using an environment variable in your script in the first place.

If you need to update a specific path, be explicit and update that path by specifying the whole path. Don't assume that your testing directory will be an immediate child of the directory you're running the batch file in unless you can control everything else - the whole subdirectory structure, where the batch file executes from, and how it executes.

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