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I am trying to add two hex numbers in a shell script and store the result as a hex number.

let "step_size = 10"
let "start_num = 20000000"
let "size = 64"
for (( i = 0; i < 1000; i = $i + $step_size ))
do
    for (( j = 0; j < $step_size; j++ ))
    do
        let "temp = $(( $(( $i * $step_size)) + $(( $j * $size )) ))"
        num=`echo "obase=16; $temp" | bc`
        echo $num
        num2=`obase=16;ibase=16; echo $start_num \\+ $num | bc`
        echo $start_num $num $num2
        echo "****"
    done
done

Not all results are wrong. I get an error only when $num = C0

Output

0
20000000 0 20000000
****
40
20000000 40 20000040
****
80
20000000 80 20000080
****
C0
20000000 C0 20000090 #This is the error!!
****
100
20000000 100 20000100
****
...
...
...
1C0
20000000 1C0 20000190 #Error again!!

I am using zshell. I am not sure why this is happening. Any help is highly appreciated.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Your posted code doesn't produce the pasted output using sh, bash, and zsh. Are you sure that you've pasted the correct code and output? – devnull Jun 3 '14 at 15:50
    
There was a typo. I corrected the code. Thanks – akhil28288 Jun 3 '14 at 16:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Probably

num2=`obase=16;ibase=16; echo $start_num \\+ $num | bc`

should be

num2=`echo "obase=16;ibase=16;$start_num + $num" | bc`

You weren't calculating hex at all.

I also suggest a simpified version like this:

#!/bin/zsh

step_size=10
start_num=20000000
size=64

for (( i = 0; i < 1000; i += step_size )); do
    for (( j = 0; j < step_size; ++j )); do
        (( temp = (i * step_size) + (j * size) ))
        num=$(echo "obase=16; $temp" | bc)
        echo "$num"
        num2=$(echo "obase=16;ibase=16;$start_num + $num" | bc)
        echo "$start_num $num $num2"
        echo "****"
    done
done

And it works both in Zsh and Bash.

# bash temp.zsh | head -20
0
20000000 0 20000000
****
40
20000000 40 20000040
****
80
20000000 80 20000080
****
C0
20000000 C0 200000C0
****
100
20000000 100 20000100
****
140
20000000 140 20000140
****
180
20000000 180 20000180
share|improve this answer

@konsolebox has a correct fix, but I think the behaviour shown in the OP is a bit mysterious, so it seems to be worth an explanation.

First, it's clear that

num2=`obase=16;ibase=16; echo $start_num \\+ $num | bc`

is incorrect because it is setting the shell variables obase and ibase rather than passing the assignment to bc. Also, it's unnecessary to quote the +. But why doesn't bc produce an error from the \, as it would if the line had been written in the modern form:

num2=$(obase=16;ibase=16; echo $start_num \\+ $num | bc)

The answer is that there is a subtle difference between `…` and $(…):

% `echo echo \\+`
+
% $(echo echo \\+)
\+

Quoting the bash manual:

When the old-style backquote form of substitution is used, backslash retains its literal meaning except when followed by $, `, or \. The first backquote not preceded by a backslash terminates the command substitution. When using the $(command) form, all characters between the parentheses make up the command; none are treated specially.

In effect, that means that the backquote-version interprets the \-escape twice: first when the backquoted string is scanned, when \\+ becomes \+, and then a second time when the resulting command is parsed, when \+ becomes +.

The second question is "where did 20000090 come from?" And here the answer is that it is a curious feature of the way bc interprets numbers. It's worth quoting the full paragraph from man bc (emphasis added):

Input numbers may contain the characters 0-9 and A-F. (Note: They must be capitals. Lower case letters are variable names.) Single digit numbers always have the value of the digit regardless of the value of ibase. (i.e. A = 10.) For multi-digit numbers, bc changes all input digits greater or equal to ibase to the value of ibase-1. This makes the number FFF always be the largest 3 digit number of the input base.

Since ibase was not set in bc (see above), bc interprets C0 as decimal 90, although it would have interpreted C as decimal 12.


Finally, with either bash or zsh, the following works just fine, with no need for bc:

% a=20000000
% b=C0
% printf "%X\n" $((0x$a+0x$b))
200000C0
share|improve this answer

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