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I'm creating an app that displays large blueprints in a tiled view with a variety of annotations (shapes) overlayed on the image. I'm drawing these shapes (mostly ellipses, lines and polygons) using UIBezierPaths, but it is using a substantial amount of memory. This is my first app, so any advice would be appreciated.

This is an example from the UIView subclass that draws ellipses. I know using an image view to display the path is not necessary, but it seemed to perform better than the alternative. My hope was that once I had the UIImage, I could dispose of the memory used by the path, but as you can see in my screenshot below that isn't really working.

CGSize size = CGSizeMake(self.frame.size.width+self.lineWeight,
                          self.frame.size.height+self.lineWeight);

UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(size);

UIBezierPath *path = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, self.frame.size.width, self.frame.size.height)];
[self.fillColor setFill];
[path closePath];
[path fill];


CGRect strokeRect = CGRectMake(self.lineWeight/2.0, self.lineWeight/2.0,
                               size.width-self.lineWeight*2.0, size.height-self.lineWeight*2.0);
UIBezierPath *strokePath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:strokeRect];
strokePath.lineWidth = self.lineWeight;
[self.lineColor setStroke];
[strokePath stroke];
[strokePath closePath];

UIImage *image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:image];
[self addSubview:imageView];

Here is a screenshot from instrument, showing the memory usage when displaying an image with 26 shapes on it, mostly ellipses.

enter image description here

Some of the blueprints I'm showing could have as many as 500 shapes, so I could really use some advice on how better to achieve this. Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

The memory problem here really isn't the UIBezierPath, but rather it's the UIImage objects (which will each take up four bytes per pixel per shape).

If this is in a UIView subclass, it's going to be far more efficient to just put this drawing code inside your drawRect method, and draw there, rather than drawing to an image. Or use this UIBezierPath to create a CAShapeLayer, and then add that layer and a sublayer of your view's layer.

But don't create UIImage objects unless you absolutely have to, as that will take up a lot of memory.


I benchmarked this looking at three approaches, benchmarking it with a fairly extreme example with 5,000 overlapping ovals, each with a size of between 20x20 and 40x40 px. Clearly, this is an absurd example, where they all overlapped with each other, but I was trying merely trying to stress test the memory consumption in an extreme scenario. Also, in my examples, I only render ovals, but you could obviously tailor this to accommodate whatever shapes you want to draw.

Anyway, my results were as follows:

  1. Creating individual UIImage objects, one for each oval shape drawn. Clearly, this will use memory fairly aggressively, requiring 4 bytes per pixel for each image. In my example, this consumed 92mb. The code for the "add oval" routine looked like so:

    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.frame.size, NO, 0);
    
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    
    CGRect strokeRect = CGRectMake(self.lineWeight/2.0, self.lineWeight/2.0,
                                   self.frame.size.width-self.lineWeight*2.0, self.frame.size.height-self.lineWeight*2.0);
    
    UIBezierPath *strokePath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:strokeRect];
    CGContextAddPath(context, strokePath.CGPath);
    [self.lineColor setStroke];
    [self.fillColor setFill];
    CGContextSetLineWidth(context, self.lineWeight);
    CGContextDrawPath(context, kCGPathEOFillStroke);
    
    UIImage *image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:self.frame];
    imageView.image = image;
    [self addSubview:imageView];
    
  2. Creating individual UIView subclass instances for each shape, each UIView subclass with its own drawRect method. While I was expecting to see some significant savings here, it was modest, consuming 94.5% as much memory, a total of 87mb:

    - (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect
    {
        CGRect strokeRect = CGRectMake(self.lineWeight/2.0, self.lineWeight/2.0,
                                       rect.size.width-self.lineWeight*2.0, rect.size.height-self.lineWeight*2.0);
    
        UIBezierPath *path = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:strokeRect];
    
        [self.lineColor setStroke];
        [self.fillColor setFill];
        path.lineWidth = self.lineWeight;
    
        [path fill];
        [path stroke];
    }
    

    It would appear that iOS must be maintaining a bitmap representation of the individual UIView subclass instances (even though shouldRasterize was turned off).

  3. Creating a model structure for the objects to be drawn, but then rendering them in a single drawRect method in the superview that shows all of these ovals. This was vastly more memory-efficient, consuming 3.5mb when rendering these 5,000 ovals, only 3.8% as much memory as the original approach with individual UIImage objects for each shape.

    - (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect
    {
        [self.lineColor setStroke];
        [self.fillColor setFill];
    
        for (NSValue *rectValue in self.ovals) {
            CGRect frame = [rectValue CGRectValue];
            CGRect strokeRect = CGRectMake(frame.origin.x + self.lineWeight/2.0, frame.origin.y + self.lineWeight/2.0,
                                           frame.size.width - self.lineWeight*2.0, frame.size.height - self.lineWeight*2.0);
            UIBezierPath *path = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:strokeRect];
            path.lineWidth = self.lineWeight;
            [path fill];
            [path stroke];
        }
    }
    

I suspect you could make the first approaches more efficient by making a snapshot and then removing the individual instances, but the third approach seems more logical.

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Thanks for the suggestion. I tried changing the ellipse view to using drawRect instead of UIImage, but now the memory usage of the actual ellipse class is greatly increased, leaving the total memory used at still around 150gb. –  seth Jun 3 at 16:30
    
@seth I finally had a few minutes to take a look at this. I noticed that when I used individual UIImage objects, one for each shape, I saw significant memory consumption. When I used a UIView subclass for each shape, while I expected some savings, it was modest. But when I had a superview with a custom drawRect that would draw all of the individual shapes, there was a huge memory savings. See revised answer. –  Rob Jun 3 at 21:01
    
Thanks for putting so much effort into this answer! I'll look into this today and report back. –  seth Jun 4 at 13:56

There is a nice solution and I can not give you the whole concrete answer in the form of code but I can give you an abstract starting point. You have to think about using Programming Design Patterns and for you situation you have to take

Flyweight pattern

When Would You Use the Flyweight Pattern?

You’d naturally think about using it when all of the following are true:

  1. Your app uses a lot of objects.
  2. Keeping objects in memory can affect memory performance.
  3. Most of the object’s unique state (extrinsic state) can be externalized and lightweight.
  4. ....

above Text is from the book: Pro Objective-C Design Patterns for iOS

read it and enjoy cording...

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