Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference between new/delete and malloc/free?

Related (duplicate?): In what cases do I use malloc vs new?

share|improve this question
add comment

9 Answers

up vote 172 down vote accepted

new/delete

  • Allocate/release memory
    1. Memory allocated from 'Free Store'
    2. Returns a fully typed pointer.
    3. new (standard version) never returns a NULL (will throw on failure)
    4. Are called with Type-ID (compiler calculates the size)
    5. Has a version explicitly to handle arrays.
    6. Reallocating (to get more space) not handled intuitively (because of copy constructor).
    7. Whether they call malloc/free is implementation defined.
    8. Can add a new memory allocator to deal with low memory (set_new_handler)
    9. operator new/delete can be overridden legally
    10. constructor/destructor used to initialize/destroy the object

malloc/free

  • Allocates/release memory
    1. Memory allocated from 'Heap'
    2. Returns a void*
    3. Returns NULL on failure
    4. Must specify the size required in bytes.
    5. Allocating array requires manual calculation of space.
    6. Reallocating larger chunk of memory simple (No copy constructor to worry about)
    7. They will NOT call new/delete
    8. No way to splice user code into the allocation sequence to help with low memory.
    9. malloc/free can NOT be overridden legally

Technically memory allocated by new comes from the 'Free Store' while memory allocated by malloc comes from the 'Heap'. Whether these two areas are the same is an implementation details, which is another reason that malloc and new can not be mixed.

share|improve this answer
4  
Another interesting factoid is the alignment guarantees. Harbison & Steele, 5th edition, says of malloc [pg. 407]: "A pointer to the first element of the region is returned, and it is guaranteed to be properly aligned for any data type." –  Don Wakefield Oct 27 '08 at 23:39
    
A similar fact is true of new for an array of char or unsigned char: C++ standard, 5.3.4-10, and obviously any new is aligned for the type of the object being allocated (5.3.4-14). –  Steve Jessop Oct 28 '08 at 3:01
27  
Too bad the two lists are not side by side, in a table-like way, to help compare the features. Is there a way to do that in StackOverflow? –  paercebal Oct 28 '08 at 13:49
    
Allocating arrays in C is best acheived via the calloc() function, not by calculating the space requirement yourself. –  gnud Oct 6 '09 at 19:40
4  
@Heath: The 'Heap' and 'Free Store' are defined in the C/C++ standards respectively. They are names of areas where free memory is allocated from. Wheather the two areas are the same is an implementation detail left upt the compiler. The term 'Free Store' was introduced into the standard to deferantiate it from the 'Heap'. Note: 1) Correct I don't mean binomial store so why bring it up. 2) Using #define to overide malloc() is not legal (as defined by the standard). –  Loki Astari Feb 13 '10 at 22:29
show 38 more comments

The most relevant difference is that the new operator allocates memory then calls the constructor, and delete calls the destructor then deallocates the memory.

share|improve this answer
10  
Strictly speaking, the new operator just allocates the memory. It is the new expression which calls the new operator, then runs the constructor in the allocated memory. –  Don Wakefield Oct 27 '08 at 23:36
    
Another difference is where the memory is allocated. I recently saw somewhere that malloc/free operate on the heap, while new/delete operate in another area of memory whose name eludes me now. (Suffice it to say, though, that other area can probably be thought of as another heap.) –  RobH Apr 30 '09 at 19:29
2  
@mgb: Yes you are correct that objects are allocated on either the "Application heap" or stack. But @RobH is referring to what the standard calls different parts of the "Application Heap". There is the "Heap" which is where malloc allocates memory from and "Free Store" where new allocates memory from. Though in some implementations these areas do overlap (this is an implementation detail). –  Loki Astari Nov 28 '09 at 2:01
1  
You statement is 100% correct but just doesn't answer the question asked, see the answer below, there is a reason why it more votes than yours. –  Murali Jan 20 '10 at 16:58
1  
All I was trying to say was there should be at least some mention of malloc/free for it to qualify as a comparison which your answer lacked. Nevertheless, it is a relevant and accurate statement, so the upvotes, I hope you understand my point. Anyway, if only SO allowed me to take my downvote back, I wholeheartedly would. –  Murali Jan 22 '10 at 3:06
show 4 more comments

new calls the ctor of the object, delete call the dtor.

malloc & free just allocate and release raw memory.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In C++ New/Delete call the Constructor/Destructor accordingly.

Malloc/Free simply allocate memory from the heap. New/Delete allocate memory as well.

share|improve this answer
add comment

new/delete is C++, malloc/free comes from good old C.

In C++, new calls an objects constructor and delete calls the destructor.

malloc and free, coming from the dark ages before OO, only allocate and free the memory, without executing any code of the object.

share|improve this answer
1  
Anybody care to explain the downvote? If my answer is wrong, please tell me. –  Treb Oct 27 '08 at 15:16
3  
"Coming from the dark ages before OO" sounds like you're implying that new/delete are better than malloc/free when in reality, neither is better or worse, they just have different uses. Note that I'm not the ont that downvoted you, I'm just guessing. –  Graeme Perrow Oct 27 '08 at 15:19
add comment

The only similarities are that malloc/new both return a pointer which addresses some memory on the heap, and they both guarantee that once such a block of memory has been returned, it won't be returned again unless you free/delete it first. That is, they both "allocate" memory.

However, new/delete perform arbitrary other work in addition, via constructors, destructors and operator overloading. malloc/free only ever allocate and free memory.

In fact, new is sufficiently customisable that it doesn't necessarily return memory from the heap, or even allocate memory at all. However the default new does.

share|improve this answer
add comment

also,

the global new and delete can be overridden, malloc/free cannot.

further more new and delete can be overridden per type.

share|improve this answer
add comment

new and delete are C++ primitives which declare a new instance of a class or delete it (thus invoking the destructor of the class for the instance).

malloc and free are C functions and they allocate and free memory blocks (in size).

Both use the heap to make the allocation. malloc and free are nonetheless more "low level" as they just reserve a chunk of memory space which will probably be associated with a pointer. No structures are created around that memory (unless you consider a C array to be a structure).

share|improve this answer
    
new in C++ doesn't declare an instance of a class. It (usually) allocates one from the heap, and it doesn't declare anything. You can declare an instance just by declaring it, in which case it will be on the stack, or in globals, depending on the storage duration of the declaration. –  Steve Jessop Oct 27 '08 at 15:14
    
Well, it allocates the memory space for the class but you can't "declare" a class in the stack, not in the real sense of storing the class in the stack. The declaration involves just the pointer to the class which is always allocated in the stack the actual memory holding the class is in the heap. –  Jorge Córdoba Oct 27 '08 at 15:28
    
Yes you can. According to the question tags this is C++, so objects can go on the stack. And new isn't a declaration, it's an expression. Declaring something and allocating it are separate things. –  Steve Jessop Oct 27 '08 at 15:40
add comment

There are a few things which new does that malloc doesn’t:

  1. new constructs the object by calling the constructor of that object
  2. new doesn’t require typecasting of allocated memory.
  3. It doesn’t require an amount of memory to be allocated, rather it requires a number of objects to be constructed.

So, if you use malloc, then you need to do above things explicitly, which is not always practical. Additionally, new can be overloaded but malloc can’t be.

In a word, if you use C++, try to use new as much as possible.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.