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I'm trying to work out an appropriate singleton model for usage in Swift. So far, I've been able to get a non-thread safe model working as:

class var sharedInstance:TPScopeManager {
    get {
        struct Static {
            static var instance : TPScopeManager? = nil
        }

        if !Static.instance {
            Static.instance = TPScopeManager()
        }

        return Static.instance!
    }
}

Wrapping the singleton instance in the Static struct should allow a single instance that doesn't collide with singleton instances without complex naming schemings, and should make things fairly private. Obviously though, this model isn't thread safe, so I tried to add dispatch_once to the whole thing:

class var sharedInstance:TPScopeManager {
    get {
        struct Static {
            static var instance : TPScopeManager? = nil
            static var token : dispatch_once_t = 0
        }

        dispatch_once(Static.token) { Static.instance = TPScopeManager() }

        return Static.instance!
    }
}

But I get a compiler error on the dispatch_once line:

Cannot convert the expression's type 'Void' to type '()'

I've tried several different variants of the syntax, but they all seem to have the same results:

dispatch_once(Static.token, { Static.instance = TPScopeManager() })

Anybody know what the proper usage of dispatch_once is using swift? I initially thought the problem was with the block due to the () in the error message, but the more I look at it the more I think it may be a matter of getting the dispatch_once_t correctly defined.

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1  
I would remove all that static code and use a readonly property with a @lazy initializer. –  Sulthan Jun 3 '14 at 21:02
    
I don't think that will work for the dispatch_once token, although it might work for the singleton instance itself. –  David Berry Jun 3 '14 at 21:02
    
That's what I meant. Unfortunately we still don't have enough information about the internals. However, IMHO any implementation of @lazy should be thread safe. –  Sulthan Jun 3 '14 at 21:04
    
And this way also has the advantage of not exposing the implementation to the predations of callers. –  David Berry Jun 3 '14 at 21:05
    
It also doesn't seem like you can have @lazy class variables. –  David Berry Jun 3 '14 at 21:08

16 Answers 16

tl;dr: Use the class constant approach if you are using Swift 1.2 or above and the nested struct approach if you need to support earlier versions.

From my experience with Swift there are three approaches to implement the Singleton pattern that support lazy initialization and thread safety.

Class constant

class Singleton  {
   static let sharedInstance = Singleton()
}

This approach supports lazy initialization because Swift lazily initializes class constants (and variables), and is thread safe by the definition of let.

Class constants were introduced in Swift 1.2. If you need to support an earlier version of Swift, use the nested struct approach below or a global constant.

Nested struct

class Singleton {
    class var sharedInstance: Singleton {
        struct Static {
            static let instance: Singleton = Singleton()
        }
        return Static.instance
    }
}

Here we are using the static constant of a nested struct as a class constant. This is a workaround for the lack of static class constants in Swift 1.1 and earlier, and still works as a workaround for the lack of static constants and variables in functions.

dispatch_once

The traditional Objective-C approach ported to Swift. I'm fairly certain there's no advantage over the nested struct approach but I'm putting it here anyway as I find the differences in syntax interesting.

class Singleton {
    class var sharedInstance: Singleton {
        struct Static {
            static var onceToken: dispatch_once_t = 0
            static var instance: Singleton? = nil
        }
        dispatch_once(&Static.onceToken) {
            Static.instance = Singleton()
        }
        return Static.instance!
    }
}

See this GitHub project for unit tests.

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1  
Yep, the answers in this section have run through all of these options. Thanks for summarizing here. I'm using the global approach because it's simpler and still has the advantage that some point I can hide the global. Although the nested struct does have the advantage that it does pollute the name space as much. –  David Berry Jun 10 '14 at 18:32
6  
"thread safe by virtue of let" — has this been stated anywhere? I can't find mention of it in the documentation. –  jtbandes Jun 18 '14 at 22:45
8  
Global and static properties are already dispatch_once'd, so there's really no need for this. You can simply define the singleton instance as a global variable or static let property of a struct. - From jckarter: devforums.apple.com/thread/229436 –  Dave Wood Jun 22 '14 at 6:47
1  
@DaveWood I assume you're talking about the last approach. I'll quote myself: "I'd say it's no longer necessary to use this approach but I'm putting it here anyway as I find the differences in syntax interesting." –  hpique Jun 22 '14 at 15:30
1  
@hpique jtbandes asked about thread safety being mentioned in the docs. That quote above was from one of the Swift devs, so I thought it would be helpful, and almost as good as documentation. I also thought the fact that globals and statics use dispatch_once under the hood was interesting. I was originally using the dispatch_once method myself and have now switched to the nested struct approach. –  Dave Wood Jun 22 '14 at 16:13
up vote 131 down vote accepted

Since Apple has now clarified that static struct variables are initialized both lazy and wrapped in dispatch_once (see the note at the end of the post), I think my final solution is going to be:

class WithSingleton {
    class var sharedInstance :WithSingleton {
        struct Singleton {
            static let instance = WithSingleton()
        }

        return Singleton.instance
    }
}

This takes advantage of the automatic lazy, thread-safe initialization of static struct elements, safely hides the actual implementation from the consumer, keeps everything compactly compartmentalized for legibility, and eliminates a visible global variable.

Apple has clarified that lazy initializer are thread-safe, so there's no need for dispatch_once or similar protections

The lazy initializer for a global variable (also for static members of structs and enums) is run the first time that global is accessed, and is launched as dispatch_once to make sure that the initialization is atomic. This enables a cool way to use dispatch_once in your code: just declare a global variable with an initializer and mark it private.

From here

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To confirm: global variables have lazy, thread-safe initialization, but class variables don't. Right? –  Bill Jun 6 '14 at 12:15
1  
@bill Class variables with initializers aren't yet supported, so it's kind of a moot point. class var GlobalVariableSharedInstance = GlobalVariable() generates an error that Class variables not yet supported global variables definitely seem to be lazy and thread-safe though. –  David Berry Jun 6 '14 at 15:19
1  
Your test code does not remotely confirm whether the class is thread safe. Basically, it's either futile or very hard to write tests which verify those things. I would rather trust a dedicated static analyzer of the assembly code. For example, thread-safety means that any two threads cannot read and write concurrently from or to the address of the shared global or any memory address indirectly accessed through this pointer (e.g. "ivars" or other members) without using synchronization primitives (e.g. memory barriers, etc.). So, what you need to test is, that this is actually impossible. –  CouchDeveloper Jul 14 '14 at 17:57
8  
I would add that a good practice would be to declare the initializer as private: private init() {}, to further enforce the fact that this class is not meant to be externally instantiated. –  Pascal Bourque Sep 26 '14 at 19:03
    
so static struct var initialization is lazy and thread safe, what if that static struct var is a dictionary for multitons, then we have to manually synchronize/queue calls to it for each access, right? –  user3610227 Dec 31 '14 at 0:27

Edit for Xcode Beta 5

With recent changes to Swift, mostly new access control methods. I am now leaning towards the cleaner way of using a global variable for singletons.

private let _singletonInstance = SingletonClass()
class SingletonClass {
  class var sharedInstance: SingletonClass {
    return _singletonInstance
  }
}

As mentioned in the Swift blog article here:

The lazy initializer for a global variable (also for static members of structs and enums) is run the first time that global is accessed, and is launched as dispatch_once to make sure that the initialization is atomic. This enables a cool way to use dispatch_once in your code: just declare a global variable with an initializer and mark it private.

This way of creating a singleton is thread safe, fast, lazy, and also bridged to ObjC for free.

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1  
Why do you say that & is not really "pass by reference"? Seems like a parameter that can be modified by the function is the definition of pass by reference. –  Lance Jun 4 '14 at 13:31
1  
From what I understand it's because the & alone doesn't make it pass by reference It's the 'inout' keyword that marks that. In this case though it's because it's a bridge to C –  Jack Wu Jun 4 '14 at 15:53
1  
Anyone reading only this answer: Remember to make the token static, otherwise the behavior is undefined. See David's edited question for the complete code. –  nschum Jun 4 '14 at 23:23
1  
Thanks for the comments and warnings, i will edit this answer to be more complete when I get to a computer. Yes, this is not functional code, but the question was about syntax and this is the correct syntax –  Jack Wu Jun 4 '14 at 23:25
1  
That's an odd thing to say. If the documentation calls it "undefined" that just means whoever wrote the code doesn't make any promises to what it does. It has nothing to do with the code knowing if the variable is static. It just means that the current (or apparent) behavior cannot not be relied upon. –  nschum Jun 11 '14 at 13:42

There is a better way to do it. You can declare a global variable in your class above the class decleration like so

var tpScopeManagerSharedInstance = TPScopeManager()

This just calls your default init or whichever init and global variables are dispatch_once by default in Swift. Then in whichever class you want to get a reference, you just do this:

var refrence = tpScopeManagerSharedInstance
// or you can just access properties and call methods directly
tpScopeManagerSharedInstance.someMethod()

So basically you can get rid of the entire block of shared instance code.

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1  
A lot of differences in this and the singleton pattern including lack of late initialization, naming requirements, etc. Do some googling for singleton pattern and you'll see that it's not nearly as simple as a global variable. –  David Berry Jun 5 '14 at 18:14
14  
In Swift, global vars are lazy, they are not set until you first access them, so it would work. There is no singleton standard in Swift right now, this was recommended to me by an Apple Engineer who worked on Swift and I am simply passing along the knowledge. –  Kris Gellci Jun 5 '14 at 18:50
1  
After writing a bunch more code, it does seem like @krisgellci is correct. It does seem like global variables are initialized both lazy and thread-safe, so the pattern can be simplified. I'll update my example above, at least partly to be callable from objective C. But also to maintain the calling model. –  David Berry Jun 6 '14 at 1:52
1  
Why a "var" and lot a "let"? –  Stephan Jun 6 '14 at 18:11
    
maybe could be a let, I only tested it out with a var. –  Kris Gellci Jun 6 '14 at 18:58

Swift 1.2 now supports static variables/constants in classes. So you can just use a static constant:

class MySingleton {

    static let sharedMySingleton = MySingleton()

    private init() {
        // ...
    }
}
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Looking at Apple's sample code I came across this pattern. I'm not sure how swift deals with statics, but this would be thread safe in C#. I include both the property and method for ObjC interop.

struct StaticRank {
    static let shared = RankMapping()
}

class func sharedInstance() -> RankMapping {
    return StaticRank.shared
}

class var shared:RankMapping {
    return StaticRank.shared
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am pretty sure that just using this default static syntax will do the all annoying jobs. –  Eonil Jun 5 '14 at 4:18
    
unfortunately statics only work inside of structs, so that's why this pattern. –  user2485100 Jun 5 '14 at 5:16
    
My intention was that we don't have to use dispatch_once stuffs. I am betting on your style. :) –  Eonil Jun 5 '14 at 5:24
1  
I like this solution, but is it thread-safe? –  Sam Jun 5 '14 at 7:46
    
Isn't class within a class declaration the equivalent of static in a struct declaration? –  Russell Borogove Jun 5 '14 at 17:51

Swift Singletons are exposed in the cocoa frameworks as class functions, e.g. NSFileManager.defaultManager(), NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter(), so I feel it makes more sense as a class function to mirror this behaviour, rather than a class variable as some other solutions use e.g.

private let _sharedInstance = MyClass()

class MyClass {
    class func sharedInstance() -> MyClass {
        return _sharedInstance
    }
}

Retrieve the singleton via MyClass.sharedInstance()

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"it makes more sense as a class function to mirror this behaviour" Absolutely!! I feel this should get all the upvotes of the other two main solutions using class properties proposed here. Those will introduce a syntactically different style for accessing singletons compared to both Cocoa framework singletons and automatically converted ObjC singletons. If anyone reads this, give this solution your vote! –  LearnCocos2D Jan 21 at 19:00
class UtilSingleton: NSObject {

    var iVal: Int = 0

    class var shareInstance: UtilSingleton {
        get {
            struct Static {
                static var instance: UtilSingleton? = nil
                static var token: dispatch_once_t = 0
            }
            dispatch_once(&Static.token, {
                Static.instance = UtilSingleton()
            })
            return Static.instance!
        }
    }

}

how to use:

UtilSingleton.shareInstance.iVal++
println("singleton new iVal = \(UtilSingleton.shareInstance.iVal)")
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly the same as one of the answers I went through on the way to the current answer. Since global variables are initialized both lazy and thread-safe, there's no reason for the additional complexity. –  David Berry Jun 6 '14 at 15:14
    
@David Other than not having a global variable. :) –  hpique Jun 10 '14 at 5:37
    
@hpique no, exactly like one of my earlier attempts. Look at the edit history. –  David Berry Jun 10 '14 at 14:47

After seeing David's implementation. It seems like there's no need to have a singleton class function instanceMethod since [let] is doing pretty much the same thing as a sharedInstance class method. All you need to do is declare it as a global constant and that would be it.

let gScopeManagerSharedInstance = ScopeManager()

class ScopeManager {
 // no need for a class method to return the shared instance. Use the gScopeManagerSharedInstance directly. 
}
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2  
As I say in my comments, the only reason to do it is that at some point in the future you can move/hide the global variable and get more singleton-like behavior. At that point, if everything is using a consistent pattern, you can just change the singleton classes themselves without having to change the usage. –  David Berry Jun 7 '14 at 4:18

I prefer this implementation:

class APIClient {

}

var sharedAPIClient: APIClient = {
    return APIClient()
}()

extension APIClient {
    class func sharedClient() -> APIClient {
        return sharedAPIClient
    }
}
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If you are planning on using your Swift singleton class in Objective-C, this setup will have the compiler generate appropriate Objective-C-like header(s):

class func sharedStore() -> ImageStore {
struct Static {
    static let instance : ImageStore = ImageStore()
    }
    return Static.instance
}

Then in Objective-C class you can call your singleton the way you did it in pre-Swift days:

[ImageStore sharedStore];

This is just my simple implementation.

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I would suggest an Enum, like you would use in Java, e.g.:

enum SharedTPScopeManager: TPScopeManager {
  case Singleton
}
share|improve this answer
    
IMO, this is the only correct Swift way to implement Singleton. other answers are ObjC/C/C++ way –  Bryan Chen Jun 30 '14 at 23:08
    
Could you elaborate on this answer? It's not clear to me where Singleton is instantiated from this snippet –  Kenny Winker Jul 6 '14 at 1:57
    
@KennyWinker I don't have an Apple developer login, therefore no swift and so I can't answer when the initialisation occurs. In Java, it is on first use. Perhaps you could try it with a print on initialization and see if the print occurs at launch or after access. It will depend on how enum is implemented by the compiler. –  Howard Lovatt Jul 7 '14 at 3:04
    
@KennyWinkler: Apple have just clarified how this works, see developer.apple.com/swift/blog/?id=7. In it they say "run the initializer for a global the first time it is referenced, similar to Java" and in particular. They also say that under the covers they are using "dispatch_once to make sure that the initialization is atomic". Therefore enum is almost certainly the way to go unless you have some fancy init to do, then a private static let is the solution. –  Howard Lovatt Aug 4 '14 at 5:11

Just for reference, here is an example Singleton implementation of Jack Wu/hpique's Nested Struct implementation. The implementation also shows how archiving could work, as well as some accompanying functions. I couldn't find this complete of an example, so hopefully this helps somebody!

import Foundation

class ItemStore: NSObject {

    class var sharedStore : ItemStore {
        struct Singleton {
            // lazily initiated, thread-safe from "let"
            static let instance = ItemStore()
        }
        return Singleton.instance
    }

    var _privateItems = Item[]()
    // The allItems property can't be changed by other objects
    var allItems: Item[] {
        return _privateItems
    }

    init() {
        super.init()
        let path = itemArchivePath
        // Returns "nil" if there is no file at the path
        let unarchivedItems : AnyObject! = NSKeyedUnarchiver.unarchiveObjectWithFile(path)

        // If there were archived items saved, set _privateItems for the shared store equal to that
        if unarchivedItems {
            _privateItems = unarchivedItems as Array<Item>
        } 

        delayOnMainQueueFor(numberOfSeconds: 0.1, action: {
            assert(self === ItemStore.sharedStore, "Only one instance of ItemStore allowed!")
        })
    }

    func createItem() -> Item {
        let item = Item.randomItem()
        _privateItems.append(item)
        return item
    }

    func removeItem(item: Item) {
        for (index, element) in enumerate(_privateItems) {
            if element === item {
                _privateItems.removeAtIndex(index)
                // Delete an items image from the image store when the item is 
                // getting deleted
                ImageStore.sharedStore.deleteImageForKey(item.itemKey)
            }
        }
    }

    func moveItemAtIndex(fromIndex: Int, toIndex: Int) {
        _privateItems.moveObjectAtIndex(fromIndex, toIndex: toIndex)
    }

    var itemArchivePath: String {
        // Create a filepath for archiving
        let documentDirectories = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSSearchPathDirectory.DocumentDirectory, NSSearchPathDomainMask.UserDomainMask, true)
        // Get the one document directory from that list
        let documentDirectory = documentDirectories[0] as String
        // append with the items.archive file name, then return
        return documentDirectory.stringByAppendingPathComponent("items.archive")
    }

    func saveChanges() -> Bool {
        let path = itemArchivePath
        // Return "true" on success
        return NSKeyedArchiver.archiveRootObject(_privateItems, toFile: path)
    }
}

And if you didn't recognize some of those functions, here is a little living Swift utility file I've been using:

import Foundation
import UIKit

typealias completionBlock = () -> ()

extension Array {
    func contains(#object:AnyObject) -> Bool {
        return self.bridgeToObjectiveC().containsObject(object)
    }

    func indexOf(#object:AnyObject) -> Int {
        return self.bridgeToObjectiveC().indexOfObject(object)
    }

    mutating func moveObjectAtIndex(fromIndex: Int, toIndex: Int) {
        if ((fromIndex == toIndex) || (fromIndex > self.count) ||
            (toIndex > self.count)) {
                return
        }
        // Get object being moved so it can be re-inserted
        let object = self[fromIndex]

        // Remove object from array
        self.removeAtIndex(fromIndex)

        // Insert object in array at new location
        self.insert(object, atIndex: toIndex)
    }
}

func delayOnMainQueueFor(numberOfSeconds delay:Double, action closure:()->()) {
    dispatch_after(
        dispatch_time(
            DISPATCH_TIME_NOW,
            Int64(delay * Double(NSEC_PER_SEC))
        ),
        dispatch_get_main_queue()) {
            closure()
    }
}
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1st solution

let SocketManager = SocketManagerSingleton();

class SocketManagerSingleton {

}

later in your code

func someFunction() {        
        var socketManager = SocketManager        
    }

2nd solution

func SocketManager() -> SocketManagerSingleton {
    return _SocketManager
}
let _SocketManager = SocketManagerSingleton();

class SocketManagerSingleton {

}

and later in your code you will be ables to keep braces for less confusion

func someFunction() {        
        var socketManager = SocketManager()        
    }
share|improve this answer

My way of implementation in Swift...

ConfigurationManager.swift

import Foundation

    let ConfigurationManagerSharedInstance = ConfigurationManager()
 class ConfigurationManager : NSObject {
    var globalDic: NSMutableDictionary = NSMutableDictionary()

class var sharedInstance:ConfigurationManager {
    return ConfigurationManagerSharedInstance

}

init() {

    super.init()

    println ("Config Init been Initiated, this will be called only onece irrespective of many calls")   

}

Access the globalDic from any screen of the application by the below.

Read:

 println(ConfigurationManager.sharedInstance.globalDic)  

Write:

 ConfigurationManager.sharedInstance.globalDic = tmpDic // tmpDict is any value that to be shared among the application
share|improve this answer
   func init() -> ClassA {
    struct Static {
        static var onceToken : dispatch_once_t = 0
        static var instance : ClassA? = nil
    }

    dispatch_once(&Static.onceToken) {
        Static.instance = ClassA()
    }

    return Static.instance!
}
share|improve this answer
    
As has been discussed at great length here, it's not necessary in swift to wrap initialization in dispatch_once since static variable initialization is lazy and automatically protected via dispatch_once Apple actually recommends using statics instead of dispatch_once for that reason. –  David Berry Jan 27 at 16:00

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