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I have at least two service (example, IVendorService and IFooService) that I'm using in most of my controllers (using Unity.Mvc5). I wanted to create a common helper for these controllers. I was thinking of creating a singleton classes with Lazy loading and with Unity. I read in one of the blogs that unity requires the constructor to be public.

This works, but this is not really using a singleton pattern.

AppHelper.cs

public sealed class AppHelper
{
    private static IList<Vendor> _vendorList;
    private static IList<Foo> _fooList;

    public AppHelper(IFooService fooService, IVendorService vendorService)
    {
        if (fooService != null) _vendorList = vendorService.GetVendors();
        if (vendorService != null) _fooList = fooService.GetFoo();
    }

    public static IList<Vendor> VendorList
    {
        get { return _vendorList; }
    }

    public static IList<Foo> FooList
    {
        get { return _fooList; }
    }
}

I've tried it this way and it gave me a compilation error.

AppHelper.cs

public sealed class AppHelper
{
    private static readonly Lazy<AppHelper> instance = new Lazy<AppHelper>(() => new AppHelper(fooService, vendorService));
    private static IList<Vendor> _vendorList;
    private static IList<Foo> _fooList;

    private AppHelper(IFooService fooService, IVendorService vendorService)
    {
        _vendorList = vendorService.GetVendors();
        _fooList = fooService.GetFoo();
    }

    public static AppHelper Instance()
    {
        return instance.Value;
    }

    public static IList<Vendor> VendorList
    {
        get { return _vendorList; }
    }

    public static IList<Foo> FooList
    {
        get { return _fooList; }
    }
}

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Why is using the singleton anti-pattern important in itself? What to you aim to gain over the code you have that works? –  Jon Hanna Jun 4 at 0:20
    
Great point. My main reason was that with the code that works, I would need to instantiate the AppHelper in each of the controller file. So I wanted to see if I there was a way I could just do a AppHelper.Instance() in the Global.asax.cs file. –  minerva Jun 4 at 0:29
    
Oh, you're only using these properties from your controllers? –  Jon Hanna Jun 4 at 0:37
    
I'm also using it in my views as well. –  minerva Jun 4 at 0:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the need for these properties or methods were solely in your controllers, then I'd have them as methods of the common base class to those controllers (it derived from System.Web.Mvc.Controller and your controllers derived from it rather than directly from Controller).

If the need was solely in the views, I'd likewise have it in a base of those.

But you have both.

One approach, is to either consider that an acceptable duplication (i.e. have it in the base of both), or to have a class much like your first, that is called into by those base classes, so that the only duplication is of very thin wrapper methods.

Whether you did that, or just had the helper called by the methods that actually need them, you could be lazier than you are:

private static class CachedElements
{
    private static IList<Vendor> _vendorList;
    private static IList<Foo> _fooList;
    public static IList<Vendor> VendorList(IVendorService vendorService)
    {
        return _vendorList = _vendorList ?? vendorService.GetVendors();
    }
    public static IList<Foo> FooList(IFooService fooService)
    {
        return _fooList = _fooList ?? fooService.GetFoos();
    }
}

(I'm sure you're already aware, but it's worth pointing out, that this shares with the original in your question the property of there being a brief period in which more than one _vendorlist may be created and used, each replacing the other due to a race between finding that _vendorList is null, and setting it. Since the actual setting is atomic, this is probably better in the long run than the effort of stopping that from happening, but it is important to know for those few times when there really most only be one such list ever created).

The advantages here are:

  1. We ensure we only create what we need (e.g. if the first request to require a vendor list didn't need a foo list, etc).
  2. The method(s) that needs a vendor list is expected to be that which has the information necessary to create one, if that hasn't already happened, while that(those) which needs a foo list is expected to have the information for that. This is more often easier than the approach where first something must work out how to create both. In particular, it lets us pass the laziness down the line, so e.g. a method that will only sometimes need a foo list need only sometimes obtain the foo-service.
  3. Relatedly, while the difference may seem to be mostly semantic, a "cache object" gives us some of the benefits of a singleton with fewer problems. In particular, while it prevents wasted calls, it avoids much of the downside of global state, because it's more like a global implementation artefact in optimising non-global-behaving code: Most of the calling code isn't written like code dependent on global state.
  4. We can more easily add more such lists or other cached information, with no impact upon the existing code that doesn't use them, either in terms of linear performance (the other code won't touch it, and won't care) concurrent performance (the cached objects can be set concurrently to each other), or code signatures (no need to change the constructor that we're no longer using).
  5. Just as we're controlling crating closer to requirement, so also we can put invalidation there too, should a future change give us cases where we can't depend on the list being immutable for the life of the application. (We aren't prevented from also having invalidation somewhere else too).

We can also handle the following changes relatively easily:

public static IList<Foo> FooList(IFooService fooService)
{
  //some change to the application has meant this is no longer safe to cache, but
  //we only needed to change one piece of code:
  return fooService.GetFoos();
}

Or a complication down the line like:

private static ConcurrentDictionary<Territory, IList<Vendor>> _vendors = new ConcurrentDictionary<Territory, IList<Vendor>>();
public static IList<Vendor> VendorList(IVendorService vendorSerice, Territory territory)
{
  // We now have different lists of vendors for different countries, states, etc.
  // We were able to make all of our changes through this place, and keep a similar
  // type of caching happening.
  return _vendors.GetOrAdd(territory, () => vendorSerice.GetVendors(territory));
}

Also, note that there is no reason to deal with this class explicitly in the calling code at all. Both VendorList and FooList can be created as extension methods. E.g. with:

public static IList<Vendor> VendorList(this IVendorService vendorService)
{
    return _vendorList = _vendorList ?? vendorService.GetVendors();
}

Now we can the calling code can call it as if it was an instance method of anything implementing IVendorService, which is ideal as it is after all just a form of GetVendors that provides some global caching anyway. Again, the global artefacts of the implementation are hidden, reducing the risk of global dependencies being pushed further through the code, or becoming hard to alter when future needs require it.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I love this! Thanks for your advice and pointing out the advantages for your implementation. And thanks for also suggesting to create extension methods for this. I really appreciate your help!!! –  minerva Jun 4 at 1:52

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