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The following CSS works well under firefox but doesn't work under IE browser, Why?
Also, how can I make only the elements, directly under the parent element, be affected by CSS?

CSS:

.box{font:24px;}
.box>div{font:18px}
.box>div>div{font:12px;}

HTML:

<div class="box">
   level1
   <div>
      level2
      <div> level3</div>
      <div> level3</div>
   </div>
   <div>
      level2
      <div> level3</div>
      <div> level3</div>
   </div>
</div>
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3 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Internet Explorer supports the child selector (>) since version 7, but only in Standards mode. Make sure you are using a Doctype that triggers standards mode.

If you are targeting IE6 then you are out of luck. You need to either depend on JS or use descendant selectors.

a>b { foo }

becomes

a b { foo }
a * b { reverse-of-foo }
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1  
Sorry to resurrect, but I'm at a loss with the reverse-of-foo part :P –  Baumr Nov 4 '12 at 5:50
    
@Baumr the a b rule will declare properties intended for the descendant; a * b rule should declare properties over-riding the rule above. –  Barney Mar 7 '13 at 17:32
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The child selector is not supported at all by IE6 and only partly by IE7.

Quirksmode.org: Child selector

CSS Compatibility tables

there is, sadly, no way to do this except to "un-declate" the definitions for all grandchildren.

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I may be wrong about what you are looking for but this is how I would tackle your problem:

.box {font:24px;}
.box div {font:18px}
.box div div {font:12px;}

This will work fine for you example, however be aware that if you have another .box with div's in it they will be affected as well.

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