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Im working on a non-blocking C tcp sockets for linux system. I've read that in non-blocking mode, the "send" command will return "bytes sent" immediately if there is no error. I'm guessing this value returned does not actually mean that those data have been delivered to the destination but rather the data has been passed to kernel memory for it to handle further and send.

If that is the case, how would my application know which packet has really been sent out by kernel to the other end, assuming that the network connection had some problems and kernel decides to give up only after several retries in a span of a few minutes later?

Im asking because i would want my application to resend those failed packets again at a later time.

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If that is the case, how would my application know which packet has really been sent out by kernel to the other end, assuming that the network connection had some problems and kernel decides to give up only after several retries in a span of a few minutes later?

Your application won't know, unless it is able to recontact the receiving application and ask the receiving application about what data it had previously received.

Keep in mind that even with blocking I/O your application doesn't block until the data is received by the remote application -- it only blocks until there is some room in the kernel's outgoing-data buffer to hold the bytes you asked the TCP stack to send(). So even with blocking I/O you would face the same issue.

Also keep in mind that the byte arrays you pass to send() do not have a guaranteed 1-to-1 correspondence to the TCP packets that the TCP stack sends out. The TCP stack is free to pack your bytes into TCP packets any way it likes (e.g. the data from multiple send() calls can end up in a single TCP packet, or the data from a single send() call can end up in multiple TCP packets, or any other combination you can think of). Depending on network conditions, TCP stacks can and do pack things various different ways, their only promise is that the bytes will be received in FIFO order (if they get received at all).

Anyway, the answer to your question is: you can't know, unless you later ask the receiving program about what it got (or didn't get).

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Or if the receiving program sends an acknowledgement reply for the data you sent. –  Remy Lebeau Jun 4 at 5:19

TCP internally takes care of retrying, application doesn't need to do any special handling for it. If you wish to confirm a packet received the other end of the TCP stack then you can set the send socket buffer (setsockopt(SOL_SOCKET, SO_SNDBUF)) to zero. In this case, kernel uses your application buffer to send the data & its only released after the TCP receives acknowledgement for this data. This way you can confirm that the data is pushed to the receiver end of the TCP stack. It doesn't confirm that the application has received the data. You need to have application layer acknowledgement in your protocol to confirm that the data reached the receiver application.

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The Linux documentation for SO_SNDBUF does not mention zero as a supported value. It does say: "The kernel doubles this value (to allow space for bookkeeping overhead) when it is set using setsockopt(2) ... The minimum (doubled) value for this option is 2048". –  Remy Lebeau Jun 4 at 5:25
    
In this article Microsoft talks about it. support.microsoft.com/kb/214397/EN-US Socket specification is general to all OS so i expected similar behavior from linux. –  dvasanth Jun 4 at 5:48
    
@dvasanth Please provide a citation for this claim. I can believe that it may be possible to set SO_SNDBUF to zero on some platforms, but not that it causes TCP to 'use the application buffer', or that it causes the application to block until an ACK has been received. Your new citation doesn't support those claims. –  EJP Jun 4 at 6:41
    
AFD is the kernel mode component of winsock. It has a configurable value in registry DefaultSendwindow which can be overridden by SO_SNDBUF. If there is enough send buffer space in send buffer, AFD simply copy the send data & indicates success to the application . If the buffer is full its make a synchronous IO to the below TCP transport driver blocking the send API in the application. If the send buffer is made zero than the application can maintain the flow control. Check the below link for AFD sendwindow size information smallvoid.com/article/winnt-winsock-buffer.html –  dvasanth Jun 5 at 18:42

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