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How to concatenate string in Swift.?

In Objective-C we do like

NSString *string = @"Swift";
NSString *resultStr = [string stringByAppendingString:@" is new Programming Language"];

or

NSString *resultStr=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ is new Programming Language",string];

But I want to do this in Swift-language.

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12 Answers 12

up vote 119 down vote accepted

You can concatenate strings a number of ways:

let a = "Hello"
let b = "World"

let first = a + ", " + b
let second = "\(a), \(b)"

You could also do:

var c = "Hello"
c += ", World"

I'm sure there are more ways too.

Bit of description

let creates a constant. (sort of like an NSString). You can't change its value once you have set it. You can still add it to other things and create new variables though.

var creates a variable. (sort of like NSMutableString) so you can change the value of it. But this has been answered several times on Stack Overflow, (see difference between let and var).

Note

In reality let and var are very different from NSString and NSMutableString but it helps the analogy.

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Dont you think it will give compile time error? – Rajneesh071 Jun 4 '14 at 9:57
    
@Rajneesh071 Why would it give a compile time error? – Fogmeister Jun 4 '14 at 9:58
    
Apple document make me confused but you got me out , thanks – Rajneesh071 Jun 4 '14 at 10:04
    
let creates a constant. (sort of like an NSString). You can't change its value once you have set it. You can still add it to other things and create new variables though. var create a variable. (sort of like NSMutableString) so you can change the value of it. But this has been answered several times on SO. Looks for difference between let and var – Fogmeister Jun 4 '14 at 10:06
    
Thanks @Fogmeister, nice explanation, make it in your answer also. – Rajneesh071 Jun 4 '14 at 10:07

You can add a string in these ways:

  • str += ""
  • str = str + ""
  • str = str + str2
  • str = "" + ""
  • str = "\(variable)"
  • str = str + "\(variable)"

I think I named them all.

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Thanks, it's helpful to see them all in one list. – Zorayr Apr 25 '15 at 19:03
var language = "Swift" 
var resultStr = "\(language) is new Programming Language"
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7  
As a side note, this is called string interpolation, not concatenation. – dcastro Jun 16 '14 at 7:42

\ this is used to combine one string to another.

var first = "Hi" 
var combineStr = "\(first) Start develop app for swift"

also used + keyword to conacat.

 var first = "Hi" 
 var combineStr = "+(first) Start develop app for swift"

Try this code.

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let the_string = "Swift"
let resultString = "\(the_string) is a new Programming Language"
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This will work too:

var string = "swift"
var resultStr = string + " is a new Programming Language"
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Very Simple:

let StringA = "Hello"
let StringB = "World"
let ResultString = "\(StringA)\(StringB)"
println("Concatenated result = \(ResultString)")
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OR let ResultString = "\(StringA)\(StringB)" – Aks Sep 1 '15 at 12:14
    
If using interpolation, the + is not needed, like Aks has mentioned. If you prefer using the +, remove the interpolation. – chitti Nov 4 '15 at 8:31

You can now use stringByAppendingString in Swift.

var string = "Swift"
var resultString = string.stringByAppendingString(" is new Programming Language")
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To print the combined string using

Println("\(string1)\(string2)")

or String3 stores the output of combination of 2 strings

let strin3 = "\(string1)\(string2)"
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XCode didn't accept optional strings added with a normal string. I wrote this extensions to solve that problem:

extension String {
    mutating func addString(str: String) {
        self = self + str
    }
}

Then you can call it like:

var str1: String?
var str1 = "hi"
var str2 = " my name is"
str1.addString(str2)
println(str1) //hi my name is

However you could now also do something like this:

var str1: String?
var str1 = "hi"
var str2 = " my name is"
str1! += str2
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Do you mind explaining this recommendation? – user3802077 Sep 2 '15 at 13:06
    
Which part? Are you familiar with extentions? – Esqarrouth Sep 2 '15 at 13:16
    
Yes, I was wondering what is gained by converting '+' in 'addString()'. If I remember correctly this way would also give you a warning instead of a compiler error if used on non mutable variable. Otherwise it's obfuscating what is going on and, IMO, nothing is easier/faster to read than '+'. Truth is there might be a reason I am blind to and that is why I was asking why this way is 'recommended' – user3802077 Sep 8 '15 at 0:01
    
I used this when xcode didn't accept adding an optional string with a normal string. it still doesn't do that directly but now it works when you force unwrap the string, so this extension is useless atm. i'll delete it after you read this left me a comment – Esqarrouth Sep 8 '15 at 10:53
    
Thanks for the explantion :). Not sure what is considered better but by adding the context to your answer it would have value even tough currently it may not be as useful as before. – user3802077 Sep 8 '15 at 16:00

You could use SwiftString (https://github.com/amayne/SwiftString) to do this.

"".join(["string1", "string2", "string3"]) // "string1string2string"
" ".join(["hello", "world"]) // "hello world"

DISCLAIMER: I wrote this extension

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One can also use stringByAppendingFormat in Swift.

var finalString : NSString = NSString(string: "Hello")
finalString = finalString.stringByAppendingFormat("%@", " World")
print(finalString) //Output:- Hello World
finalString = finalString.stringByAppendingFormat("%@", " Of People")
print(finalString) //Output:- Hello World Of People
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