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In the Introduction to Swift WWDC session, a read-only property description is demonstrated:

class Vehicle {
    var numberOfWheels = 0
    var description: String {
        return "\(numberOfWheels) wheels"
    }
}

let vehicle = Vehicle()
println(vehicle.description)

Are there any implications to choosing the above approach over using a method instead:

class Vehicle {
    var numberOfWheels = 0
    func description () -> String {
        return "\(numberOfWheels) wheels"
    }
}

let vehicle = Vehicle()
println(vehicle.description())

It seems to me that the most obvious reasons you would choose a read-only computed property are:

  • Semantics - in this example it makes sense for description to be a property of the class, rather than an action it performs.
  • Brevity/Clarity - prevents the need to use empty parentheses when getting the value.

Clearly the above example is overly simple, but are there other good reasons to choose one over the other? For example, are there some features of functions or properties that would guide your decision of which to use?


N.B. At first glance this seems like quite a common OOP question, but I'm keen to know of any Swift-specific features that would guide best practice when using this language.

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Watch 204 session - "When Not to Use @property" It has some tips –  Kostiantyn Koval Jul 30 '14 at 13:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It seems to me that it's mostly a matter of style: I strongly prefer using properties for just that: properties; meaning simple values that you can get and/or set. I use functions (or methods) when actual work is being done. Maybe something has to be computed or read from disk or from a database: In this case I use a function, even when only a simple value is returned. That way I can easily see whether a call is cheap (properties) or possibly expensive (functions).

We will probably get more clarity when Apple publishes some Swift coding conventions.

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There is a difference: If you use a property you can then eventually override it and make it read/write in a subclass.

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1  
You can also override functions, too. Or add a setter to provide writing ability. –  Johannes Fahrenkrug Jun 5 '14 at 12:45
    
You can add a setter or define a stored property when the base class defined the name as a function? Surely you can do it if it defined a property (that's exactly my point), but I do not think you can do it if it defined a function. –  Analog File Jun 5 '14 at 13:23
    
Once Swift has private properties (see here stackoverflow.com/a/24012515/171933), you could simply add a setter function to your subclass to set that private property. When your getter function is called "name", your setter would be called "setName", so no naming conflict. –  Johannes Fahrenkrug Jun 5 '14 at 13:52
    
You can do it already (the difference is that the stored property you use for support will be public). But the OP asked if there is a difference between declaring a read only property or a function in the base. If you declare a read only property, you can then make it read-write in a derived class. An extension that adds willSet and didSet to the base class, without knowing anything of future derived classes, can detect changes in the overridden property. But you cannot do anything like that with functions, I think. –  Analog File Jun 5 '14 at 14:04

Since the runtime is the same, this question applies to Objective-C as well. I'd say, with properties you get

  • a possibility of adding a setter in a subclass, making the property readwrite
  • an ability to use KVO/didSet for change notifications
  • more generally, you can pass property to methods that expect key paths, e.g. fetch request sorting

As for something specific to Swift, the only example I have is that you can use @lazy for a property.

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Historically description is a property on NSObject and many would expect that it continues the same in Swift. Adding parens after it will only add confusion.

EDIT: After furious downvoting I have to clarify something - if it is accessed via dot syntax, it can be considered a property. It doesn't matter what's under the hood. You can't access usual methods with dot syntax.

Besides, calling this property did not require extra parens, like in the case of Swift, which may lead to confusion.

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1  
Actually this is incorrect - description is a required method on the NSObject protocol, and so in objective-C is returned using [myObject description]. Anyway, the property description was simply a contrived example - I'm looking for a more generic answer that applies to any custom property/function. –  Stuart Jun 4 '14 at 11:23
    
@Stuart edited the answer –  Dvole Jun 4 '14 at 11:34
1  
Thanks for some clarification. I'm still not sure I completely agree with your statement that any parameterless obj-c method that returns a value can be considered a property, although I do understand your reasoning. I'll retract my down vote for now, but I think this answer is describing the 'semantics' reason already mentioned in the question, and cross-language consistency isn't really the issue here either. –  Stuart Jun 4 '14 at 12:02

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