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i am simulating my crypto scheme in python, i am a new user to it.

p = 512 bit number and i need to calculate largest prime factor for it, i am looking for two things:

  1. Fastest code to process this large prime factorization
  2. Code that can take 512 bit of number as input and can handle it.

I have seen different implementations in other languages, my whole code is in python and this is last point where i am stuck. So let me know if there is any implementation in python.

Kindly explain in simple as i am new user to python

sorry for bad english.

edit (taken from OP's answer below):

#!/usr/bin/env python
def highest_prime_factor(n):
   if isprime(n):
      return n
   for x in xrange(2,n ** 0.5 + 1):
      if not n % x:
         return highest_prime_factor(n/x)

def isprime(n):
   for x in xrange(2,n ** 0.5 + 1):
      if not n % x:
         return False
   return True

if  __name__ == "__main__":
   import time
   start = time.time()
   print highest_prime_factor(1238162376372637826)
   print time.time() - start

The code above works (with a bit of delay) for "1238162376372637826" but extending it to

10902610991329142436630551158108608965062811746392 57767545600484549911304430471090261099132914243663 05511581086089650628117463925776754560048454991130443047

makes python go crazy. Is there any way so that just like above, i can have it calculated it in no time?

share|improve this question
    
512-bit number is 155 digits, which is simply a Python long. No special code is required. There's really not much to this. Except, of course, the actual algorithm for factoring large primes. Do you need the algorithm? What do you have so far? –  S.Lott Mar 8 '10 at 18:38
11  
Um. You are aware that factorizing a general 512-bit number is at the very limits of what can currently be done on a single machine in a reasonable amount of time? Here's a quote from wikipedia: "As of the end of 2007, [...] general-form numbers of up to about 520 bits can be factored in a few months on a few PCs by a single person without any special mathematical experience." See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_factorization_records –  Mark Dickinson Mar 8 '10 at 19:09
5  
-1: "Is there any way so that just like above, i can have it calculated it in no time?" Asking such a question indicates that you're really unclear on what you're doing. –  S.Lott Mar 8 '10 at 23:53

4 Answers 4

For a Python-based solution, you might want to look at pyecm On a system with gmpy installed also, pyecm found the following factors:

101, 521, 3121, 9901, 36479, 300623, 53397071018461, 1900381976777332243781

There still is a 98 digit unfactored composite:

60252507174568243758911151187828438446814447653986842279796823262165159406500174226172705680274911

Factoring this remaining composite using ECM may not be practical.

Edit: After a few hours, the remaining factors are

6060517860310398033985611921721

and

9941808367425935774306988776021629111399536914790551022447994642391

share|improve this answer

If you can install an extension, gmpy would help -- see my answer to this SO question, specifically the def prime_factors(x) function in the code I show there.

In pure Python (without any extension allowed) it's a tad harder and a lot slower, see the code here for example (but don't hold your breath while it runs on your huge numbers;-).

share|improve this answer

This should be a better fit then the trivial approach for large numbers (although with this kind of number crunching every pure Python implementation will take a while): Pollard Rho prime factorization.

share|improve this answer
2  
The Pollard tests generally don't handle that large of an input in practical time. Rho looks for relatively small factors. P-1 and P+1 algorithms look for primes who are one more or less than a number whose factors are all small. None are adequate for 512 bits today unless you have a special number. –  phkahler Mar 8 '10 at 18:59
    
@phkahler: thanks for commenting; did not know that. I've always found Pollard to be very fast for (relatively) large numbers, but off course I've never thrown 512 bits at it. –  ChristopheD Mar 8 '10 at 19:17

('''==============================================================================='''

   '''              CALCULATE  HIGHEST PRIME

FACTOR '''

'''===============================================================================''')

!/usr/bin/env python

def highest_prime_factor(n): if isprime(n): return n for x in xrange(2,n ** 0.5 + 1): if not n % x: return highest_prime_factor(n/x) def isprime(n): for x in xrange(2,n ** 0.5 + 1): if not n % x: return False return True if name == "main": import time start = time.time() print highest_prime_factor(1238162376372637826) print time.time() - start

the code works with a bit of delay on the number : "1238162376372637826" but extending it to (109026109913291424366305511581086089650628117463925776754560048454991130443047109026109913291424366305511581086089650628117463925776754560048454991130443047) makes python go crazy. Is there any way just like above, i can have it calculated it in no time.

share|improve this answer
1  
You should have put this in your question (Stackoverflow does not follow the traditional forum flow but is question-answers based). I'll put it in for you, it would be best if you removed this 'answer' then... –  ChristopheD Mar 8 '10 at 19:29
3  
If I had away to factor large primes in "no time", I would be a very rich man. –  mikerobi Mar 8 '10 at 20:05

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