Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have below 3 queries in a single flat file. i want to split 3 queries separately into 3 files. Each query is seperated by";"(semi colon). Please suggest how can i do this?

input file: query.sql

select * from 
DBNAME.table1;

select * from 
DBNAME.table2
;

select * from 
DBNAME.table3
WHERE date<= current_date-30;

output should be

file1: query1.sql

select * from 
DBNAME.table1;

file2: query2.sql

select * from 
DBNAME.table2
;

file3: query3.sql

select * from 
DBNAME.table3
WHERE date<= current_date-30;
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This can make it:

awk -v RS="" '{print > "query"(++i)".sql"}' file

With -v RS="" we define each record as a paragraph. Then it is a matter or printing them to queryNUMBER.sql. To do that, we use the ++i that increments every single time.

See created files:

$ cat query1.sql 
select * from 
DBNAME.table1;

$ cat query2.sql 
select * from 
DBNAME.table2
;

$ cat query3.sql 
select * from 
DBNAME.table3
WHERE date<= current_date-30;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. i used -v RS=";" instead of -v RS="" as i wanted the paragraph to be separated with ";" –  Abdul Jun 4 '14 at 12:22
    
Good one! Did it solve your problem then, @Abdul ? Since you're new here, please don't forget to mark the answer accepted if your problem is already solved. You can do it clicking on the check mark beside the answer to toggle it from hollow to green. See Help Center > Asking if you have any doubt! –  fedorqui Jun 4 '14 at 12:22
    
Yes i got what i needed. –  Abdul Jun 4 '14 at 12:24
    
how do i modify the above command if i wish to extract only 2nd query. i.e. select * from DBNAME.table2 ; –  Abdul Jul 1 '14 at 11:16
    
@Abdul well you can for example do awk -v RS="" 'NR==2{print > "query2.sql"}' file. This will extract the second paragraph. –  fedorqui Jul 4 '14 at 18:22

You can use these sed commands to get each set of lines, and send them to the right file. The first sed command gets lines 1 and 2, and sends them to query1.sql. The second sed command gets lines 4 to 6, and sends them to query2.sql. The third sed command gets lines 8 to 10, and sends them to query3.sql.

#!/bin/sh

sed -n '1,2p' query.sql > query1.sql
sed -n '4,6p' query.sql > query2.sql
sed -n '8,10p' query.sql > query3.sql
share|improve this answer
1  
Please try to flesh out your answer a bit more. Just posting a code block without any explanation or context is not good. In its current state your answer might not be of any use to people looking for an answer to this question in the future. –  Xaver Kapeller Jun 4 '14 at 16:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.