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Inside a golang program i want to source a file (in this case its .clean) which would look like this

$HOME/directory1
$HOME/directory1/.directory2
$HOME/directory3

and then run the rm -rf command before each directory. Does anyone know how to accomplish this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this using a bufio.Scanner.

Bold text added by me.

Scanner provides a convenient interface for reading data such as a file of newline-delimited lines of text. Successive calls to the Scan method will step through the 'tokens' of a file, skipping the bytes between the tokens. The specification of a token is defined by a split function of type SplitFunc; the default split function breaks the input into lines with line termination stripped. Split functions are defined in this package for scanning a file into lines, bytes, UTF-8-encoded runes, and space-delimited words. The client may instead provide a custom split function.

Example using os.RemoveAll():

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    f, err := os.Open(".clean")
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    s := bufio.NewScanner(f)
    for s.Scan() {
        fmt.Println("Deleting:", s.Text())
        if err := os.RemoveAll(s.Text()); err != nil {
            log.Println(err)
        }
    }
    if err := s.Err(); err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
}

Playground

Or, using Cmd.Run() from os/exec to run rm -rf:

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
    "os/exec"
)

func main() {
    f, err := os.Open("file.txt")
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    s := bufio.NewScanner(f)
    for s.Scan() {
        fmt.Println("Deleting:", s.Text())
        cmd := exec.Command("rm", "-rf", s.Text())
        if err := cmd.Run(); err != nil {
            log.Println(err)
        }
    }
    if err := s.Err(); err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
}

Playground

share|improve this answer
    
@theallegedjosh, note that the suggested program as is, won't do much interesting using your file because that file contains references to environment variables. Hence you will either have to somehow preprocess it to detect and expand those variables or take one of two alternate routes: 1) exec not just rm but /bin/sh -c 'rm -rf " + s.Text() + "'; 2) start a shell process and send to its standard input each line extracted from your file prefixed with rm -rf -- this way the shell will be started just once which is a performance win –  kostix Jun 4 '14 at 16:20
    
@theallegedjosh, note that @konsolebox's suggestion might be used as a an extension to the second approach I proposed; the course of action would be: 1) Create a temporary file (using syscall.Mktemp() or something like this); 2) Run the shell passing it the file name of that script as a parameter; 3) Just connect the opened file to the shell process' cmd.Stdin variable -- without parsing or modifying it in any way; and the script passed to the shell will take care of the rest; 4) Delete the temporary script file when it's done. –  kostix Jun 4 '14 at 16:23
    
@kostix Very good point, I didn't take environment variables into account, I only tested the code with static paths. –  Intermernet Jun 4 '14 at 16:27
    
@kostix I've updated the first example replacing os.Remove() with os.RemoveAll() which gets around this problem from a Go POV, but you are still correct with regards to the original requirement of prefacing each line with rm -rf. –  Intermernet Jun 4 '14 at 16:58

Instead of "sourcing" the file, you could instead just read it:

while IFS= read TARGET; do
    rm -fr "${TARGET/'$HOME'/$HOME}"
done < .clean

You can also add checks to it like skipping comments:

while read TARGET; do  ## Explicitly do not change IFS to exclude leading and trailing spaces.
    case "$TARGET" in
    \#*)
        # Skip comments.
        ;;
    *)
        rm -fr "${TARGET/'$HOME'/$HOME}"
        ;;
    esac
done < .clean

If you need more compatibility i.e. it doesn't support ${PARAM/X/Y} expansion method, just used sed anyway:

rm -fr "$(echo "$TARGET" | sed "s|\$HOME|$HOME|")"  ## No 'g'. I doubt it's sensible to have two `$HOME`'s.
share|improve this answer
    
im talking about placing rm -rf before each direcory inside of the golang program –  nyumal Jun 4 '14 at 12:01
    
Oh. Well your descriptions are still misleading. Mind updating more info on how it should be done? –  konsolebox Jun 4 '14 at 12:04

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