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I'm trying to redirect the output of my script and it needs to be called inside the script.

filename=uname -a
filename="$filename" date

2>&1 | tee $filename".txt"

That is what I have so far, but it's obviously wrong. I don't know too much SH scripting, so help is appreciated

-Alex

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possible duplicate of redirect COPY of stdout to log file from within bash script itself -- sorry for the shameless advertising, but I didn't want to copy my answer over. ;-) –  DevSolar Oct 30 '13 at 8:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
filename=uname -a
filename="$filename" date

2>&1 | tee $filename".txt"

... If you look at the code I posted above I'm trying to dynamically name the log and use tee to print to both the console and the command line.

I think you're looking for something like this:

filename="$(uname -n)-$(date +%F).txt"
{
  dostuff
  domorestuff
} 2>&1 | tee "$filename"
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its wrong because you are not assigning your variables properly. Assuming date is GNU date, and not some "date" function you created. you might be looking for. Use $() syntax to execute commands and put to variable.

filename="$(uname -a)$(date)"

By the way, are you sure you want to use uname -a for filename ? you might also want to consider formatting your date like date +%Y%m%d-%H%m%s for example.

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You should just print everything to console with echo. Then you can redirect that to a log. For example:

# my_file.sh
echo "Doing stuff"
# Do stuff

# Invocation:
my_file.sh > my_log.log

This gives you the most flexibility and elegance.

You can also write to log directly from script, like:

# my_file.sh
echo "Doing stuff" > my_log.log
# Do stuff
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That doesn't really answer my question. If you look at the code I posted above I'm trying to dynamically name the log and use tee to print to both the console and the command line. –  Buzkie Mar 8 '10 at 18:49

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