Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to construct a two row table similar to following:

---
-

where the bottom is filling the space of the upper row. Is this possible using CSS?

Edit: as I was afraid of, there's no way to do this.

share|improve this question
7  
The best solution really depends on what is going into the table. If it's data (something that belongs in a table) then use a table. If you are using a table to control the layout of the page, then one of the HTML+CSS solutions below is better. –  mwcz Mar 8 '10 at 19:31
    
Add markup for both cases, then show only one at a time using a Media query CSS class. –  DigitalDesignDj May 12 at 23:52

9 Answers 9

up vote 226 down vote accepted

I must respectfully disagree with the answer that colspan is exclusively indicative of structure, and the implicit notion that you shouldn't even be trying to solve your problem this way. To say this with no room for dispute is, at worst, naive, or at best, disingenuous. It is not in service to the person asking the question.

If you have a section of a table that you choose to span multiple columns for appearance's sake, then it isn't structural. It's appearance. And, despite this, there's no simple, elegant CSS analog for it. That's the honest answer, and I say that as a CSS fan. CSS does many things very, very well. Tables are not among them.

That may not be the popular answer, but I believe it to be the honest one. The truth is that the distinction between structure and presentation is not a bright white line, but a decidedly blurred one. I won't presume to tell you your need for spanning columns is right or wrong. Searches on this very issue will return a variety of solutions that include a bevy of alternatives, including absolute positioning, sizing, along with a similar variety of browser- and circumstance-specific caveats. Read, and make the best informed decision you can based on what you find.

share|improve this answer
8  
Tables are structural elements and just because using colspan changes its appearance does not mean it's not. CSS is used to style elements and not change the structure. The W3C discusses table structure here: w3.org/TR/html401/struct/tables.html#h-11.2 –  Rob Apr 5 '10 at 16:40
42  
Rob, understand your position, but look in the W3C recommendations - specifically pertaining to the entire table paradigm - and you'll find that part of their consideration was, most certainly, the presentation of tables. This idea that tables were purely conceived as structure is a contemporary fiction I think we'd all be better served to stop spreading. The point is we need to stop being dogmatic about tables. It would be wrong for me to say they're always presentation, and it is just as wrong for you to say they're always structure. Reality is simply not that cut-and-dried. –  David Apr 5 '10 at 17:54
3  
Looks like your answer is the popular answer. :) I'm happy to learn that the anti-table dogma (which I have bought into) is too strict. I do stand by my answer only insofar as I still think colspan is the right tool for the job. My answer was 75% right, and yours is 100% right. You should come back to SO. –  mwcz Jan 17 '12 at 4:59
32  
After 2 years, I googled this and wanted to vote up the author but it said "can't vote for your own post" and I realized it was me, lol. I decided to change the accepted solution to this one since I feel it has better information. –  Tower Feb 29 '12 at 13:06
1  
I think the deciding factor (for me at least) in the presentation vs structure argument is that by offering the "presentation" aspects of a "structural" element, the W3C is admitting (so to speak) that there are use-cases for an element to look like another element. And it's not really fair to extend this ability and then hit the brakes on col and row span on the grounds that this is a "structural" attribute, not stylistic. On the other side of the coin, I do think offering col and row span via CSS also opens the door for its use on actual table elements, which would be inappropriate. –  Anthony Mar 24 '12 at 12:34

There is no colspan in css as far as I know, but there will be column-span for multi column layout in the near future, but since it is only a draft in CSS3, you can check it in here. Anyway you can do a workaround using div and span with table-like display like this.

This would be the HTML:

<div class="table">
  <div class="row">
    <span class="cell red first"></span>
    <span class="cell blue fill"></span>
    <span class="cell green last"></span>
  </div>
</div>
<div class="table">
  <div class="row">
    <span class="cell black"></span>
  </div>
</div>

And this would be the css:

  /* this is to reproduce table-like structure
     for the sake of table-less layout. */
  .table { display:table; table-layout:fixed; width:100px; }
  .row { display:table-row; height:10px; }
  .cell { display:table-cell; }

  /* this is where the colspan tricks works. */
  span { width:100%; }

  /* below is for visual recognition test purposes only. */
  .red { background:red; }
  .blue { background:blue; }
  .green { background:green; }
  .black { background:black; }

  /* this is the benefit of using table display, it is able 
     to set the width of it's child object to fill the rest of 
     the parent width as in table */
  .first { width: 20px; }
  .last { width: 30px; }
  .fill { width: 100%; }

The only reason to use this trick is to gain the benefit of table-layout behaviour, I use it alot if only setting div and span width to certain percentage didn't fullfil our design requirement.

But if you don't need to benefit from the table-layout behaviour, then durilai's answer would suit you enough.

share|improve this answer
2  
Yup, but a little fix: instead of .span { ... it should be span { .... –  SlavikMe Dec 13 '12 at 14:12
    
Here's a fiddle of that: jsfiddle.net/wholcomb/4ugC8 –  Will Dec 13 '13 at 23:43

That isn't part of the purview of CSS. colspan describes the structure of the page's content, or gives some meaning to the data in the table, which is HTML's job.

share|improve this answer
<div style="width: 100%;">
    <div style="float: left; width: 33%;">Row 1 - Cell 1</div>
    <div style="float: left; width: 34%;">Row 1 - Cell 2</div>
    <div style="float: left; width: 33%;">Row 1 - Cell 3</div>
</div>
<div style="clear: left; width: 100%;">
Row 2 - Cell 1
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I can't know the width of the cells. –  Tower Mar 10 '10 at 8:33
    
Then don't put a width. It should not matter. But if you want them to span the same width then the two main divs need to have the same width. –  Dustin Laine Mar 10 '10 at 18:18

You could trying using a grid system like http://960.gs/

Your code would be something like this, assuming you're using a "12 column" layout:

<div class="container_12">
<div class="grid_4">1</div><div class="grid_4">2</div><div class="grid_4">3</div>
<div class="clear"></div>
<div class="grid_12">123</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
column-span: all; /* W3C */
-webkit-column-span: all; /* Safari & Chrome */
-moz-column-span: all; /* Firefox */
-ms-column-span: all; /* Internet Explorer */
-o-column-span: all; /* Opera */

http://www.quackit.com/css/css3/properties/css_column-span.cfm

share|improve this answer
2  
Does not yet work on firefox –  Raveren Mar 5 '13 at 8:48
    
not enough support...IE8 is sadly still a lingering issue for evolution –  beauXjames Jul 12 '13 at 17:30
2  
OP wants to have a table-cell span multiple table columns. column-span is for controlling a column-layout. Which lets you flow text over several columns, the way newspapers do. –  Chris Wesseling Oct 3 '13 at 22:08

if you use div and span it will occupy more code size when the datagrid-table row are more in volume. This below code is checked in all browsers

HTML:

<div id="gridheading">
<h4>Sl.No</h4><h4 class="big">Name</h4><h4>Location</h4><h4>column</h4><h4>column</h4><h4>column</h4><h4>Amount(Rs)</h4><h4>View</h4><h4>Edit</h4><h4>Delete</h4> 
</div>
<div class="data"> 
<h4>01</h4><h4 class="big">test</h4><h4>TVM</h4><h4>A</h4><h4>I</h4><h4>4575</h4><h4>4575</h4></div>
<div class="data"> 
<h4>01</h4><h4 class="big">test</h4><h4>TVM</h4><h4>A</h4><h4>I</h4><h4>4575</h4><h4>4575</h4></div>

CSS:

#gridheading {
    background: #ccc;
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #BBBBBB;
    font-size: 12px;
    line-height: 30px;
    text-transform: capitalize;
}
.data {
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #BBBBBB;
    display: block;
    font-weight: normal;
    line-height: 20px;
    text-align: left;
    word-wrap: break-word;
}
 h4 {
    border-right: thin dotted #000000;
    display: table-cell;
    margin-right: 100px;
    text-align: center;
    width: 100px;
    word-wrap: break-word;
}
.data .big {
    margin-right: 150px;
    width: 200px;
}
share|improve this answer

Media Query classes can be used to achieve something passable with duplicate markup. Here's my approach with bootstrap:

<tr class="total"> <td colspan="1" class="visible-xs"></td> <td colspan="5" class="hidden-xs"></td> <td class="focus">Total</td> <td class="focus" colspan="2"><%= number_to_currency @cart.total %></td> </tr>

colspan 1 for mobile, colspan 5 for others with CSS doing the work.

share|improve this answer

You could always position:absolute; things and specify widths. It's not a very fluid way of doing it, but it would work.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.