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I am trying to compare two vector objects, and return a single vector containing all the chars which appear in both vectors.

How would I go about this without writing some horribly complex manual method which compares every char in the first vector to every char in the second vector and using an if to add it to a third vector (which would be returned) if they match.

Maybe my lack of real experience with vectors is making me imagine this will be harder than it really is, but I suspect there is some simplier way which I have been unable to find through searching.

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Modified the title slightly because in the previous incarnation it looked like you were looking for std::vector<t>::operator< :) –  Billy ONeal Mar 8 '10 at 19:37

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think you're looking for std::set_intersection. The source vectors have to be sorted though. If you don't care about the order of your output vector, you could always run it on sorted copies of your source vectors.

And BTW, the manual naive way isn't horribly complex. Given two source vectors s1 and s2, and a destination vector dest, you could write something that looks like this:

for (std::vector<char>::iterator i = s1.begin(); i != s1.end(); ++i)
{
    if (std::find(s2.begin(), s2.end(), *i) != s2.end())
    {
        dest.push_back(*i);
    }
}

You have a lot of options for the find step depending on your choice of data structure.

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Thank you. I was expecting it to be something like this. –  Sam Phelps Mar 8 '10 at 19:36
1  
set_intersection only works if both vectors are sorted. –  Jon-Eric Mar 8 '10 at 19:37
    
@Jon-Eric: I believe Kristo already said that.... –  Billy ONeal Mar 8 '10 at 19:38
    
@BillyONeal Kristo's answer didn't include that part when I left the comment. –  Jon-Eric Mar 8 '10 at 19:40
1  
It is important to note that binary_search requires the range to be ordered, so that manual implementation will only work if s2 is in fact ordered. If none of the ranges is ordered you can use std::find instead of std::binary_search which will be slower (O( n^2 ) for the whole algorithm) but does not require ordering. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 8 '10 at 19:59

If I had to do this on two unsorted vectors (without library help), I think I'd add all the elements of one to a hashtable then iterate through the second looking up each--should be more efficient than sorting both lists first as well.

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int temp[5000]; // declare this globally if you're going to be 
                // doing a lot of set_intersection calls   

int main() {

  char x[]={'a','b','c','d','e'};
  char y[]={'b','c','g'};
  vector<char> v1(x,x+sizeof x/sizeof x[0]);
  vector<char> v2(y,y+sizeof y/sizeof y[0]);
  sort(v1.begin(),v1.end());
  sort(v2.begin(),v2.end());  // the vectors *must* be sorted!!!!!!

  vector<char> inter=vector<char>(temp,set_intersection(v1.begin(),v1.end(),v2.begin(),v2.end(),temp)); // inter contains {'b','c'}
  int cnt=set_intersection(v1.begin(),v1.end(),v2.begin(),v2.end(),temp) - temp;    // cnt=2

  for(int i = 0; i < (int)inter.size(); ++i) {
    cout<<inter[i]<<" ";
  }
  cout<<endl;

  return 0;
}
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Let me check I understand this, as I think this has helped me understand the stuff about set_intersection I have found since posting the question. inter contains b and c, which are the characters common to x and y right? –  Sam Phelps Mar 8 '10 at 19:43
1  
@Sam Phelps - Yes, that is right. And cnt contains the number of elements that are in the intersection (I just put that there in case you only needed to get the count of intersected elements for some reason). –  dcp Mar 8 '10 at 19:44
1  
It might be clearer to use insert iterators instead of allocating a fixed size array for your destination vector. –  Michael Kristofik Mar 8 '10 at 19:53

Use set_intersection. Here's a working sample:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<string> v1;
    v1.push_back("Mary");
    v1.push_back("had");
    v1.push_back("a");

    vector<string> v2;
    v2.push_back("a");
    v2.push_back("little");
    v2.push_back("lamb");

    sort(v1.begin(), v1.end());
    sort(v2.begin(), v2.end());

    vector<string> v3;
    set_intersection(v1.begin(), v1.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end(), back_inserter(v3));

    copy(v3.begin(), v3.end(), ostream_iterator<string>(cout, "\r\n"));
    return 0;
}
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This doesn't extend well beyond standard char type (maybe to unicode, depending on application), but if you're interested in doing this in O(n) time, this should work.


#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

std::vector<char> intersect(const std::vector<bool>& x,
                            const std::vector<bool>& y)
{
    std::vector<char> rv;

    std::vector<bool>::const_iterator ix, iy;
    size_t i;

    for (i=0, ix = x.begin(), iy = y.begin();
         ix != x.end() && iy != y.end();
         ++i, ++ix, ++iy)
        if (*ix && *iy) rv.push_back( (char) i);

    return rv;
}

std::vector<bool> poll(const std::vector<char>& x)
{
    std::vector<bool> rv(256, false);

    for (std::vector<char>::const_iterator i = x.begin(); i != x.end(); ++i)
        rv[*i] = true;

    return rv;
}

std::vector<char> build(const std::string& val)
{
    std::vector<char> rv;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < val.size(); ++i)
        rv.push_back(val[i]);

    return rv;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::vector<char> x1 = build("The Quick Brown Fox Jumps Over The Lazy Dog");
    std::vector<char> x2 = build("Oh give me a home where the buffalo roam");

    std::vector<char> intersection = intersect(poll(x1), poll(x2));

    for (std::vector<char>::iterator i=intersection.begin();
            i != intersection.end(); ++i)
        std::cout << *i;

    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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Since it turns out from your later question you only actually care about 26 characters:

std::bitset<26> in;
for (std::vector<char>::iterator it = first.begin(); it != first.end(); ++it) {
    in[*it - 'a'] = true;
}
for (std::vector<char>::iterator it = second.begin(); it != second.end(); ++it) {
    if (in[*it - 'a']) {
        result.push_back(*it);
        // this line is only needed if 'second' can contain duplicates
        in[*it - 'a'] = false;
    }
}

In fact a bitset<UCHAR_MAX> is small on almost all architectures. Just watch out for those DSPs with 32-bit chars, and be cautious adapting this technique to wchar_t.

With BOOST_FOREACH, the code even looks reasonable:

assert(UCHAR_MAX <= 512 && "What kind of crazy machine is this?");
std::bitset<UCHAR_MAX> in;

BOOST_FOREACH(unsigned char c, first) {
    in[c] = true;
}

BOOST_FOREACH(unsigned char c, second) {
    if (in[c]) {
        result.push_back(c);
        // this line is only needed if 'second' can contain duplicates
        in[c] = false;
    }
}
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Maybe you should be using std::strings instead of vectors, if you have characters in them? Strings have plenty of functionality for searching etc.

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