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I'm looking to read a certain "category" from a .csv file that looks something like this:

Category 1, header1, header2, header3,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
Category 2, header1, header2, header3,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
Category 3, header1, header2, header3,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...

Let's say I wanted to print only the data from a specific "category"... how would I go about doing this?

ie: I want to print Category 2 data, the output should look like:

Category 2, header1, header2, header3,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...
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2  
Have a look at Text::CSV_XS –  Hunter McMillen Jun 4 '14 at 15:06
    
I forgot to mention; I can't download modules/source code at work... –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 15:09
    
You could take a try at implementing a simple one on your own, but here are some reasons why that would be a bad idea: tburette.github.io/blog/2014/05/25/… –  Hunter McMillen Jun 4 '14 at 15:15
    
@user3707618: Then download it at home and take it in on a flash drive! –  Borodin Jun 4 '14 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unless your data includes quoted fields, like a,b,c,"complicated field, quoted",e,f,g there is no advantage in using Text::CSV over a simple split /,/.

This example categorizes the data into a hash that you can access simply and directly. I have used Data::Dump only to show the contents of the resulting data structure.

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

open my $fh, '<', 'mydata.csv';

my $category;
my %data;
while (<$fh>) {
  chomp;
  my @data = split /,/;
  my $cat = shift @data;
  $category = $cat if $cat =~ /\S/;
  push @{ $data{$category} }, \@data;
}

use Data::Dumper;
$Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1;
print Dumper \%data;

output

{
  "Category 1" => [
                    [" header1", " header2", " header3", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                  ],
  "Category 2" => [
                    [" header1", " header2", " header3", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                  ],
  "Category 3" => [
                    [" header1", " header2", " header3", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                    [" data", " data", " data", "..."],
                  ],
}

Update

If all you want is to separate a given section of the file then there is no need to put it into a hash. This program will do what you want.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my ($file, $wanted) = @ARGV;

open my $fh, '<', $file;

my $category;

while (<$fh>) {
  my ($cat) = /\A([^,]*)/;
  $category = $cat if $cat =~ /\S/;
  print if $category eq $wanted;
}

Run it like this on the command line

get_category.pl mydata.csv 'Category 2' > cat2.csv

output

Category 2, header1, header2, header3,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...,
          , data, data, data,...
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like what I need, I'll give it a shot right now.. thanks! –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 15:37
    
Is there a way of printing the data without the use of Data::Dump? –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 15:46
    
I have changed my code to use Data::Dumper instead. It is a core module that is part of a standard installation of Perl, and so shouldn't need installing. It doesn't produce such neat results as Data::Dump though. –  Borodin Jun 4 '14 at 15:51
    
Sorry, I'm really new to Perl... How would I print a specific category to an output file? –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 16:11
    
^ that is... in the same format as the input file? –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 16:17

If that output is definitely what you want, then you could do this with a perl one-liner:

perl -ne "$p = 0 if /^Category/;$p = 1 if /^Category 2/;print if $p;" myfile.csv
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it would only output the header line though... –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 15:38
    
Why? It turns off printing when it hits "Category" at SOL, but turns it back on if it hits "Category 2". (sorry - had trouble adding code in an edit) –  Tom Melly Jun 4 '14 at 19:47
    
Oh I see, my bad.. Wouldn't this keep printing into "Category 3" though? –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 20:04
    
No, it will continue printing until it hits the string 'Category' that is not 'Category 2', so it stops printing when it hits 'Category 3'. –  Tom Melly Jun 4 '14 at 20:13
    
Ahh... it seems I'm pretty slow today –  andrejr Jun 4 '14 at 20:47

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