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Pretty new to jQuery here, I've got a chunk of code that works OK in Chrome, but fails in IE9 (have not tried FF yet).

Here's the code:

var textColor = $('#navmenu-body').css('color');
textColor = textColor.slice(4);

In IE9, I get an error to the effect that slice can't be called because textColor is undefined.

I was not sure if it's because jQuery just can't find the #navmenu-body element or that it can't find the CSS attribute color.

So I did:

var j = $('#navmenu-body');
var textColor = $('#navmenu-body').css('color');
textColor = textColor.slice(4);

In IE9's console, j.length returns 0. So the selector is indeed, not working

Here's the #navmenu-body HTML DOM

<div id="navmenu-body" class="x-panel-body x-panel-body-cssmenu x-layout-fit x-panel-body-cssmenu" style="height: 398px; left: 0px; top: 0px; width: 200px;">
</div>

Do I need to do something else for IE9 support ?

As per T.J. Crowder answer, I think I may have a problem where the selector is called before the element I'm trying to get is available.

I am primarily developing in Chrome (using ExtJS which dynamically generates all HTML content, so there may be some conflicts with jQuery) and I had to change:

$(document).ready(function () {
    ...
    var textColor = $('#navmenu-body').css('color');
    textColor = textColor.slice(4);
});

to:

$(window).load(function () {
    ...
    var textColor = $('#navmenu-body').css('color');
    textColor = textColor.slice(4);
});

For it to work in Chrome. But that "fix" doesn't work in IE9 apparently. From what I can read, it would seem ExtJS (which generates all of my HTML content) is initialized after the DOM and jQuery is ready, so that would explain it... By why would it work in Chrome then ?

I think I need to open a new, ExtJS related question.

share|improve this question
2  
Maybe you should look at the value and type of textColor before you try to slice it ;-) –  jahroy Jun 4 '14 at 15:15
2  
So in IE9's debugger, turns out j is defined so it would seem jQuery has troubles getting the CSS attribute..." No. The way jQuery works, $(...) will always return a jQuery object. That jQuery object may have no matching elements in it, but it won't be undefined or null. (If you call css or any of the other accessors on it, you'll get back undefined or null as there is no value to return.) –  T.J. Crowder Jun 4 '14 at 15:16
2  
what is j.length in IE9? If it's > 0 the selector is working, but it's not returning the color. –  LuudJacobs Jun 4 '14 at 15:16
1  
@KevinB Yes. I fixed that. –  Francis Ducharme Jun 4 '14 at 15:18
1  
Can you try to reproduce it in a jsFiddle ? –  Brewal Jun 4 '14 at 15:19

1 Answer 1

var j = $('#navmenu-body');
var textColor = $('#navmenu-body').css('color');
textColor = textColor.slice(4);

So in IE9's debugger, turns out j is defined so it would seem jQuery has troubles getting the CSS attribute and textColor ends up being null.

No. The way jQuery works, $(...) will always return a jQuery object. That jQuery object may have no matching elements in it, but it won't be undefined or null.

But that object is apparently empty, because that's the only time jQuery will return undefined from css("color"). (Even if the first element in the set has no color, it will return "", not undefined.)

Do I need to do something else for IE9 support ?

No, all current versions of jQuery support IE9 directly.

What's going on here is that in your IE9 testing, the selector #navmenu-body didn't match any elements as of when you ran it. You'll have to determine why that is, as we don't have enough information in the question to answer that.

At a guess, it sounds like IE9 is firing some event or callback earlier than Chrome is (or you have a race condition and it was just luck of the draw). Or you're using conditional comments and that element just doesn't exist in IE9. (IE9 still had conditional comments.) Or an error occurred elsewhere in IE9, stopping your code and preventing your adding that element to the DOM. Etc. So look at where you're doing this code relative to where that element is created. Fundamentally, if the element exists and is in the DOM as of when you run var textColor = $("#navmenu-body").css("color");, textColor will be a string. It may be an empty string, but it'll be a string.


Re your edit about switching from ready to load: It sounds like whatever ExtJS stuff you're doing to create the element is happening after an ajax call or some such, and that call is completing before the load event fires on Chrome (so the element is there) but after load fires on IE9 (so it isn't).

Ideally, you want to register a callback with ExtJS, telling ExtJS to call you when the operation creating the element is complete. Then you don't need to use ready or load.

A very dirty workaround is to poll:

$(document).ready(function () {
    // ...

    init();
    function init() {
        var navmenuBody = $('#navmenu-body');
        if (!navmenuBody[0]) {    // **Very** dirty workaround
            setTimeout(init, 50); // It wasn't there yet, so check back in 50ms
            return;
        }
        var textColor = navmenuBody.css('color');
        textColor = textColor.slice(4);
    }
});

But again, that's a very dirty workaround. I'm sure there's a relevant callback you can get from ExtJS.

share|improve this answer
    
I have modified my question. –  Francis Ducharme Jun 4 '14 at 15:31
2  
@FrancisDucharme: I've updated the answer. There's bound to be a callback you can use. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 4 '14 at 15:42

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