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I wrote a zsh function to help me do some grepping at my job.

   function rgrep (){ 
if [ -n "$1" ] && [ -n "$2" ]
then
    exec grep -rnw $1 -r $2
elif [ -n "$1" ]
then
    exec grep -rnw $1 -r "./"
else
    echo "please enter one or two args"
fi  
}

Works great, however, grep finishes executing I don't get thrown back into the shell. it just hangs at [process complete] any ideas? I have the function in my .zshrc

share|improve this question
    
why are you using exec. I believe what you describe would the expected behavior. Try removing the execs. Good luck. – shellter Jun 4 '14 at 15:36
    
Why are you calling exec? – anubhava Jun 4 '14 at 15:36
    
Your question is tagged bash, but your mention of .zshrc implies that you are using zsh. – chepner Jun 4 '14 at 15:47
    
@chepner I mean in this case it doesnt matter, and i suspect there are more bash users than zsh users so i tagged it bash – Jake Schievink Jun 4 '14 at 16:02
    
The tags exist to target the appropriate audience, not the largest audience. – chepner Jun 4 '14 at 16:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In addition to getting rid of the unnecessary exec, you can remove the if statement as well.

function rgrep (){
    grep -rwn "${1:?please enter one or two args}" -r "${2:-./}"
}

If $1 is not set (or null valued), an error will be raised and the given message displayed. If $2 is not set, a default value of ./ will be used in its place.

share|improve this answer
    
great to know, thank you – Jake Schievink Jun 4 '14 at 16:03

Do not use exec as it replace the existing shell.

exec [-cl] [-a name] [command [arguments]]

If command is supplied, it replaces the shell without creating a new process. If the -l option is supplied, the shell places a dash at the beginning of the zeroth argument passed to command. This is what the login program does. The -c option causes command to be executed with an empty environment. If -a is supplied, the shell passes name as the zeroth argument to command. If no command is specified, redirections may be used to affect the current shell environment. If there are no redirection errors, the return status is zero; otherwise the return status is non-zero.

Try this instead:

rgrep ()
{ 
    if [ -n "$1" ] && [ -n "$2" ]
    then
        grep -rnw "$1" -r "$2"
    elif [ -n "$1" ]
    then
        grep -rnw "$1" -r "./"
    else
        echo "please enter one or two args"
    fi  
}
share|improve this answer

As a completely different approach, I like to build command shortcuts like this as minimal shell scripts, rather than functions (or aliases):

% echo 'grep -rwn "$@"' >rgrep
% chmod +x rgrep
% ./rgrep
Usage: grep [OPTION]... PATTERN [FILE]...
Try `grep --help' for more information.
% 

(This relies on a traditional behavior of Unix: executable text files without #! lines are considered shell scripts and are executed by /bin/sh. If that doesn't work on your system, or you need to run specifically under zsh, use an appropriate #! line.)

One of the main benefits of this approach is that shell scripts in a directory in your PATH are full citizens of the environment, not local to the current shell like functions and aliases. This means they can be used in situations where only executable files are viable commands, such as xargs, sudo, or remote invocation via ssh.

This doesn't provide the ability to give default arguments (or not easily, anyway), but IMAO the benefits outweigh the drawbacks. (And in the specific case of defaulting grep to search PWD recursively, the real solution is to install ack.)

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