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I'm trying to implement a recursive backtracking algorithm in javascript (determine if a word is an anagram). The rough idea is I permute every single combination of the different letters, then I compare the final word to the wordlist.

I've gotten the code to work, but the syntax is a little ugly because to avoid the for-loop with closure errors, I've used a self-invoking anonymous function, stored that value, and if it is true, return to break the for loop. I'm just wondering if there is a smarter way to implement the code so I don't need to worry about closures?

var wordList = ['boats', 'horse', 'cow'];

var input = 'oastb';

function isAnagram(sofar, remaining) {

  if (remaining.length === 0) {
    console.log('returning: ' + (wordList.indexOf(sofar) !== -1))
    if (wordList.indexOf(sofar) !== -1) {
      console.log(sofar);
      return true;
    } else {
      return false;
    }
  } else {
     for (var i = 0; i < remaining.length; i++) {
      var found = (function(index) {
        if (isAnagram(sofar + remaining[index], remaining.substring(0, index) + remaining.substring(index + 1))) return true;
      })(i);

      if(found) return true;
    };    
  }

  return false;


}

isAnagram('', input);
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, there's an easier way to determine whether a given word is an anagram of a list of words. First, we need to normalize each word so that each anagram produces the same unique word.

For example:

normalize("boats") = "abost";
normalize("horse") = "ehors";
normalize("cow")   = "cow";
normalize("oastb") = "abost";

As it turns out, implementing such a function in JavaScript is very simple:

function normalize(word) {
    return word
        .split("") // convert the string into an array of characters
        .sort()    // sort the array of characters in lexicographic order
        .join(""); // convert the sorted array of characters into a string
}

Next, we create a function that takes a given list of words, normalizes them, and adds them to a dictionary which maps each normalized word to its list of anagrams.

function dictionaryOf(words) {
    var dictionary = {};

    words.forEach(function (word) {
        var norm = normalize(word);
        if (dictionary.hasOwnProperty(norm))
            dictionary[norm].push(word);
        else dictionary[norm] = [word];
    });

    return dictionary;
}

Then, we create a function which when given a dictionary of normalized words to anagrams and a specific word, returns the list of anagrams of that word.

function anagramsOf(dictionary, word) {
    var norm = normalize(word);
    return dictionary.hasOwnProperty(norm) ?
        dictionary[norm] : [];
}

Finally, we can implement the isAnagram function as follows:

function isAnagram(dictionary, word) {
    return anagramsOf(dictionary, word).length > 0;
}

We use it as follows:

var dictionary = dictionaryOf(["boats", "horse", "cow"]);

alert(isAnagram(dictionary, "oastb"));

Putting it all together:

var dictionary = dictionaryOf(["boats", "horse", "cow"]);

alert(isAnagram(dictionary, "oastb"));

function normalize(word) {
    return word.split("").sort().join("");
}

function dictionaryOf(words) {
    var dictionary = {};

    words.forEach(function (word) {
        var norm = normalize(word);
        if (dictionary.hasOwnProperty(norm))
            dictionary[norm].push(word);
        else dictionary[norm] = [word];
    });

    return dictionary;
}

function anagramsOf(dictionary, word) {
    var norm = normalize(word);
    return dictionary.hasOwnProperty(norm) ?
        dictionary[norm] : [];
}

function isAnagram(dictionary, word) {
    return anagramsOf(dictionary, word).length > 0;
}

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, and I didn't think of that approach at all. Really smart solution! –  Dan Tang May 9 at 3:45

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