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I have two list of members like this:

Before: Peter, Ken, Julia, Tom

After: Peter, Robert, Julia, Tom

As you can see, Ken is is out and Robert is in.

What I want is to detect the changes. I want a list of what has changed in both lists. How can linq help me?

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1  
I think you need to define "change" a little more. Is a change in order of items a "change" to you, for example? –  Chris Farmer Mar 8 '10 at 20:02
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4 Answers

Your question is not completely specified but I assume that you are looking for the differences as sets (that is, ordering does not matter). If so, you want the symmetric difference of the two sets. You can achieve this using Enumerable.Except:

before.Except(after).Union(after.Except(before));
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@Will: Thanks for the corrections. –  Jason Jan 18 '12 at 2:56
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As an alternative to linq answers, which have to pass both lists twice, use HashSet.SymmetricExceptWith():

var difference = new HashSet(before);
difference.SymmetricExceptWith(after);

Could be considerably more efficient.

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Another way:

before.Union(after).Except(before.Intersect(after))
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Here is the version having O(n) complexity

    public static IEnumerable<T> SymmetricDifference<T>(IEnumerable<T> coll1, IEnumerable<T> coll2, IComparer<T> cmp)
    {
        using (IEnumerator<T> enum1 = coll1.GetEnumerator())
        using (IEnumerator<T> enum2 = coll2.GetEnumerator())
        {
            bool enum1valid = enum1.MoveNext();
            bool enum2valid = enum2.MoveNext();
            while (enum1valid && enum2valid)
            {
                int cmpResult = cmp.Compare(enum1.Current, enum2.Current);
                if (cmpResult < 0)
                {
                    yield return enum1.Current;
                    enum1valid = enum1.MoveNext();
                }
                else if (cmpResult > 0)
                {
                    yield return enum2.Current;
                    enum2valid = enum2.MoveNext();
                }
                else
                {
                    enum1valid = enum1.MoveNext();
                    enum2valid = enum2.MoveNext();
                }
            }
            while (enum1valid)
            {
                yield return enum1.Current;
                enum1valid = enum1.MoveNext();
            }
            while (enum2valid)
            {
                yield return enum2.Current;
                enum2valid = enum2.MoveNext();
            }
        }
    }


    public static IEnumerable<T> SymmetricDifference<T>(IEnumerable<T> coll1, IEnumerable<T> coll2)
    {
        return SymmetricDifference(coll1, coll2, Comparer<T>.Default);
    }
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This would work only for sorted sequences, right? One cannot make symdiff in just O(n) for arbitrary sequences. –  Vlad Sep 4 '12 at 13:55
    
Sure it does, just look at the co-iteration. It is slightly modified version of sequential-merge from merge-sort. Although it will not work for unsorted, it is very efficient for sorted, so in many cases it will be faster and more memory-friendly to pre-sort the collection and then use this filter ~> n + 2*(n log n) instead of some naiive all-vs-all n^2 or some hashtable memory hogs ..in case of many elements of course:) –  quetzalcoatl Jan 18 '13 at 16:07
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