Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a program to calculate the factorial of a number. I am using recursion to solve this problem. The problem I am running into is that once I reach number 13, it will throw garbage numbers because of INT's limit. What I want to do is implement a way to catch the error when it happens (without hard cording that at x=13 it has to stop, but rather by the output). This is my attempt:

#include <stdio.h>

int factorial( int n)
{
    printf("Processing factorial( %d )\n", n);

    if (n <= 1)
    {
        printf("Reached base case, returning...\n");
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        int counter = n * factorial(n-1);       //Recursion to multiply the lesser numbers

        printf("Receiving results of factorial( %d ) =  %d * %d! = %d\n", n, n, (n-1), counter);

        if( counter/n != factorial(n-2) ) //my attempt at catching the wrong output
        {
            printf("This factorial is too high for this program ");
            return factorial(n-1);
        }
        return counter;


        printf("Doing recursion by calling factorial (%d -1)\n", n);
    }


}


int main()
{
    factorial(15);
}

The problem with this is that the program now never terminates. It keeps on looping and throwing me random results.

Since I cannot answer my own question, I will edit with my solution:

int jFactorial(int n)
{
    if (n <= 1)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        int counter = n *jFactorial(n-1);
        return counter;
    }
}

void check( int n)
{
    int x = 1;
    for(x = 1; x < n+1; x++)
    {
        int result = jFactorial(x);
        int prev = jFactorial(x-1);
        if (((result/x) != prev) || result == 0 )
        {
            printf("The number %d makes function overflow \n", x);
        }
        else
        {
            printf("Result for %d is %d \n", x, result);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why would counter / n ever equal factorial(n-2)? Never mind the fact that adding an extra recursive case is a little questionable, your math is just wrong. –  hobbs Jun 4 at 17:54
    
@hobbs I am trying to check for factorial(N)/N not equal the factorial of the previous number because that would tell me if the output is correct or not. –  user3708229 Jun 4 at 17:56
    
yes, I understand that. –  hobbs Jun 4 at 17:56
    
"the previous number" isn't factorial(n-2), it's factorial(n-1). –  hobbs Jun 4 at 17:57
    
I take it you are aware that recursion is a bad way to calculate a factorial compared to simply calculating the product of 2..n. –  Andrew Morton Jun 4 at 17:59

2 Answers 2

A better way to do it:

if (n <= 1) {
   return 1;
} else {
    int prev_fact = factorial(n - 1);
    if (INT_MAX / prev_fact < n) { /* prev_fact * n will overflow */
        printf("Result too big");
        return prev_fact;
    } else {
        return prev_fact * n;
    }
}

Uses a more accurate check (I hope) for whether the multiplication will overflow, and doesn't add any more calls to factorial.

share|improve this answer
    
How can I define int_max? I tried #define MAXIMUM INT_MAX but it won't work –  user3708229 Jun 4 at 18:16
    
I do not think this would work. Let's take 3 for example. MAX_INT is 4.1b, divided by the previous factorial (2) which has a result of 2. Then, 4.1b/2 is bigger than n, which is 3, and it would output result too big. Look at my edit, I was able to solve it with two methods, now I am trying to merge those two methods into 1. –  user3708229 Jun 4 at 19:38
    
@hobbs Think you want if (MAX_INT / prev_fact < n) {. < vs. >. –  chux Jun 4 at 20:34
    
@chux right you are. –  hobbs Jun 4 at 22:33
    
@user3708229 #include <limits.h> –  hobbs Jun 4 at 22:34

Update

After looking more closely, turns out I missed the fact that gmp is also implemented for C. Here is the solution in C

I've been able to run it on my macbook pro, using homebrew to install gmp (brew isntall gmp)

#include <gmp.h>

#include <stdio.h>

void factorial(mpz_t ret, unsigned n) {
  if (n <= 1) {
    mpz_set_ui(ret, 1);//Set the value to 1
  } else {
    //multiply (n-1)! with n
    mpz_t ret_intermediate;
    mpz_init (ret_intermediate);//Initializes to zero
    factorial(ret_intermediate, n-1);
    mpz_mul_ui(ret, ret_intermediate, n);
  }

  return;
}

int main(){
  mpz_t result;
  mpz_init (result);
  factorial(result, 100);
  char * str_result = mpz_get_str(NULL, 10, result);
  printf("%s\n", str_result);
  return 0;
}

Original Answer

After quick googling, I found the following solution. Note this is a C++ solution. I briefly descirbe how you could do the same thing in ANSI C at the bottom.

Big numbers library in c++

https://gmplib.org/ This c++ library can work on numbers arbitrarily large.

Checkout https://gmplib.org/manual/C_002b_002b-Interface-General.html

The whole code could look something like....

#include <gmpxx.h>

#include <iostream>

mpz_class factorial(unsigned n) {
  if (n <= 1) return mpz_class(1);

  return mpz_class(n) * factorial(n-1);
}

int main(){
  mpz_class result = factorial(100);
  std::string str_result = result.get_str();
  std::cout << str_result << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

The ANSI C Version

You could implement the same thing using ansi C, with a structure to hold expanding list of numbers(using linked-list or any other expandable arraylist containers), and you'd only need to implement three methods... initialize, multiply and convert to string.

share|improve this answer
    
But that would not work if the result overflows. And it doesn't look like ANSI C –  user3708229 Jun 4 at 18:18
    
yes you are right this is C++ solution. With something like factorial you'd have to implement the big number class like mpz_class by hand. Which is doable actually. –  Spundun Jun 4 at 18:20
    
@user3708229 I've added a brief guideline on adapting it to ANSI C. Let me know if there's still any confusion. –  Spundun Jun 4 at 18:25
    
check my edit and tell me if you think it is a better solution than yours –  user3708229 Jun 4 at 19:33
    
@user3708229 This answer will not overflow until the program completely runs out of memory. –  Spundun Jun 4 at 19:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.