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I have written the following in C, and would like to retrieve the address of the variable x:

    int x = 10;
    int *address_of_x = &x;
    printf("The address of x is: %s \n", address_of_x);
    printf("The value of x is: %i \n", *address_of_x);

In this case, where I put %s, I don't get any value. If I change it to %i, I get an integer value. I was expecting the address to be like having a mix of numbers and letters. So, does the letter following % matter here, which seems does?

What should I do in this case to get the address of the variable x?

Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by JAB, P0W, Joshua Taylor, Rikayan Bandyopadhyay, delnan Jun 4 at 18:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
%s means: Take that pointer, interpret it as a char *, and print the text it points at. %i means: Take that int and print it in base 10. Both are wrong when you pass an int *. –  delnan Jun 4 at 17:58

2 Answers 2

printf("The address of x is: %p \n", &x);
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Try instead:

printf("The address of x is: %p \n", (void*)address_of_x);

%p here stands for pointer, for some more of these identifier you can look here

i.e. %x shows the address as a nice hex number

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Thanks for your reply. What does (void*) mean? –  user3704067 Jun 4 at 18:03
    
Trying to print an address with %x might give you a surprise in a 64-bit program with 32-bit integers. –  Mark Ransom Jun 4 at 18:13
    
@medcompsweng You really don't need the (void*), but technically, printf requires a pointer of type (void*). A void pointer is essentially a pointer that can represent any data type (you can look more about this). So by putting that cast there, we just ensure that printf is getting the type it is supposed to. –  Iowa15 Jun 4 at 20:46