Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is the following at all possible in c#?

I have the following but the last line won't compile, am i missing something?

public static void BuildGeneric<T>(List<T> l)
{
    l = new List<T>();
    var anything = new object();
    l.Add(anything);
}

"The best overloaded method match for 'System.Collections.Generic.List.Add(T)' has some invalid arguments"

share|improve this question
    
An ArrayList can do this though... –  Maxim Zaslavsky Mar 8 '10 at 20:53
7  
What on earth are you trying to do? –  SLaks Mar 8 '10 at 20:54
    
This method build a list, but the list can be one of two types hence it being generic - one less parameter –  maxp Mar 8 '10 at 20:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted
public static void BuildGeneric<T>(List<T> l)
{
    l = new List<T>();
    var anything = new object();
    l.Add(anything);
}

should be this

public static void BuildGeneric<T>(out List<T> l)
{
    l = new List<T>();
    var anything = default(T);
    l.Add(anything);
}

Now you could do

BuildGeneric<object>(out l);

Since there is a discussion (comment) below about the default keyword, I thought I should include a link to it:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xwth0h0d(VS.80).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Ohhh +1 for default(T) I've never seen that before. –  Spencer Ruport Mar 8 '10 at 20:55
4  
Let me just add (for the benefit of the questioner) that this will create a list with a null in it if T is a reference type. You could use new T() instead if you put the generic constraint new() on T, which ensures that T must have a default constructor. If T is a value type it doesn't matter as structs in C# always have a default constructor (and you can't define your own) default(SomeReferenceType)yields null, default(SomeValueType) default constructs a value type, equal to new SomeValueType() –  Skurmedel Mar 8 '10 at 20:57
1  
@Skurmedel, good point! –  Kevin Mar 8 '10 at 21:02
    
Argh, typo and I can no longer edit my comment :) –  Skurmedel Mar 8 '10 at 21:03

No.

l can only hold objects of type T.
Your code tries to defeat the entire purpose of generics.

If you change anything to be of type T, it will work.
If you cast it to T, it will compile, but will throw an InvalidCastException at runtime unless it acutally is a T.

What are you trying to do?

share|improve this answer

You need to modify your function in this way:

public static void BuildGeneric<T>(ref List<T> l)
    where T : new()
{
    l = new List<T>();
    T anything = new T();
    l.Add(anything);
}
share|improve this answer

To me it sounds like you want to create a list which contains any kinds of items. Correct? As already pointed out - this can't be done.

An appropriate approach to this would be to create a common interface for the kind of objects you want in the collection. Have all the classes you want in the collection implement this interface, and then you can have a list containing elements implementing this interface.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.