Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm trying to scan open ports with a given IP-Adress. I found some examples but I get an Out of Memory exception if I give 65535 tasks. I though hmm, maybe it's to much. So I tried 2000.. Still to much. A 1000? YES.

But apperantly the problem lies at 'TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning'. If i try TaskCreationOptions.None is does everyhting but really slow!! like my grandma can scan ports much faster.

And the funny thing is, If I debug(F5 - Visual studio), then it works but if I execute the program without debugging it doesn't. So I can scan 1000 ports in a few seconds, but how do I implement a queue?

Here is my code. I tried looping, execute on finish, etc.. nothing :(

Any help is appriciated, Thanks in advance!

    private void ScanPorts()
    {
        int startPort = 1000;
        int endPoint = 65535;

        myProgressBar.Value = 0;
        myProgressBar.Step = 1;
        myProgressBar.Maximum = endPoint - startPort + 1;

        var scans = from i in Enumerable.Range(startPort, endPoint - startPort + 1)
                    select ScanSinglePortTask(i).ContinueWith(t => Response(t.Result), TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

        var tasks = scans.ToArray();

    }

    private Task<string> ScanSinglePortTask(int currPort)
    {
        return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            try
            {
                using (var tcpportScan = new TcpClient())
                {
                    tcpportScan.SendTimeout = 10;

                    tcpportScan.Connect("127.0.0.1", (int)currPort);
                }
                return "IP: 127.0.0.1 - Port " + currPort + " open.\n";
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return "IP: 127.0.0.1 - Port " + currPort + " closed.\n";
            }
        }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    }
    private void Response(object message)
    {
        lblProgress.Text = ((string)message);
        listBox1.Items.Add(((string)message));
        listBox1.SelectedIndex = listBox1.Items.Count - 1;
        myProgressBar.PerformStep();
    }

EDIT

TEMP SOLUTION

So I managed to get rid of the Out of Memory exception by setting my platform target from x86 to x64.

So apperantly a x86 has 2Gigs of VIRTUAL memory while x64 over 6TB+ VIRTUAL memory.

This isn't a solution if you ask me, but a temporary one.

NEW SOLUTION

x86 and x64 bit compatible!

A queueing system I implemented, no answers on this post so I thought I will share my solution for those who need it.

So basicly this code scans all ports of any given IP adress (1000 ports at the same time, so 1000 threads) I can scan a local ip in 2 minutes, an internet IP a bit longer, maybe 5. Depending on your cpu speed and internetconnection ofcourse.

I added some comments for you guys :)

(Please do no use this for hacking purposes xD and Vote if you like this)

public partial class PortScanner : Form
{
    private int totalScans = 0;
    private IPAddress ipAddress;
    public PortScanner()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            //Check for valid IP
            if (IPAddress.TryParse(txtIP.Text, out ipAddress))
            {
                btnScan.Enabled = false;
                btnScan.Text = "Scanning...";

                //Stops GUI Freeze
                MethodInvoker startScanning = new MethodInvoker(ScanPorts);
                startScanning.BeginInvoke(null, null);

            }
            else
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Invalid IP");
            }

        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
        }
    }

    private void ScanPorts()
    {
        int startPort = 1;
        int endPoint = 65535;

        // n ports to scan!
        int maxTheads = 1000;

        //Set progressbar 
        myProgressBar.Value = 0;
        myProgressBar.Step = 1;
        myProgressBar.Maximum = endPoint - startPort + 1;

        //Main task list (consist of multiple lists of 1000 tasks)
        List<List<Task>> myTasks = new List<List<Task>>();
        for (int i = startPort; i <= endPoint; i = i + maxTheads)
        {
            List<Task> subTasks = new List<Task>();
            for (int j = i; j < i + maxTheads && j <= endPoint; j++)
            {
                subTasks.Add(ScanSinglePortTask(j));
            }
            myTasks.Add(subTasks);
        }

        //Start ALL TASKS
        startTask(myTasks);

    }
    public void startTask(List<List<Task>> myTasks)
    {
        //A thousand task at a time.
        foreach (List<Task> t in myTasks)
        {
            foreach (Task st in t)
            {
                st.Start();
            }
            Task.WaitAll(t.ToArray());
        }
        btnScan.Enabled = true;
        btnScan.Text = "Start Scanning";
    }

    private Task ScanSinglePortTask(int currPort)
    {
        return new Task(()=>
        {
            try
            {
                using (var tcpportScan = new TcpClient())
                {
                    tcpportScan.SendTimeout = 10;
                    tcpportScan.Connect(ipAddress, (int)currPort);

                }
                Response("IP: " + ipAddress.ToString() + " - Port " + currPort + " open.\n");
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                Response("IP: " + ipAddress.ToString() + " - Port " + currPort + " closed.\n");
            }
        }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    }
    private void Response(object message)
    {
        totalScans++;
        if (message != null)
        {
            try
            {
                lblProgress.Text = "Total portscan: " + totalScans.ToString();
                lbConnections.Items.Add(((string)message));
                lbConnections.SelectedIndex = lbConnections.Items.Count - 1;
                myProgressBar.PerformStep();
                if (((string)message).EndsWith("open.\n"))
                {
                    lbOpenConnections.Items.Add((string)message);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {

            }

        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Each managed thread or fibre in .Net consumes a megabyte of stack space. If you don't need that much stack space and would like to have more threads (not saying this is a good idea, by the way!) you can control the stack space size, reducing it should allow more threads to be created

http://www.atalasoft.com/cs/blogs/rickm/archive/2008/04/22/increasing-the-size-of-your-stack-net-memory-management-part-3.aspx

This article will help you understand why LongRunning is having an impact; you're basically bypassing the threadpool and creating a dedicated thread.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff963549.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Steven V Jun 4 at 20:32
    
@Allan Elder Thanks for the response, yet can't seem to figure this out man. Maybe a queueing solution? –  Eli Jun 4 at 21:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.