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As the documentation say, We have a new array of Int values to a variable called a. This array is also assigned to two further variables called b and c:

var a = [1, 2, 3]
var b = a
var c = a

Set a value to a[0]

a[0] = 42
println(a[0])
// 42
println(b[0])
// 42
println(c[0])
// 42

Then modify the array’s length. Will prompts Swift to create a new copy of the array.

a.append(4)
a[0] = 777
println(a[0])
// 777
println(b[0])
// 42
println(c[0])
// 42

But why Swift use this feature? any advantages?

Array in swift is a true array like array in C,not a array list object or NSMutableArray.

Hard to understand why Apple keep it in such high-level language. No doubt It's error-prone.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by David, Jaap, EdChum, greg-449, Girish Nair Jun 5 at 9:34

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Multiple answers here that all say, "by design" Your question as to "Why?" is entirely opinion based though. –  David Jun 5 at 5:56
    
@David You're right, It better to be a discussion than a question. –  DouO Jun 5 at 12:56
    
Maybe remove the "But why Swift use this feature?" in your question. You could put "What are the advantages of copying an array when appending an element" –  Martin Konecny Jun 5 at 15:18
    
That would still be a matter of opinion @martinkonecny. –  David Jun 5 at 15:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the documentation:

Note that the array is not copied when you set a new value with subscript syntax, because setting a single value with subscript syntax does not have the potential to change the array’s length. However, if you append a new item to a, you do modify the array’s length. This prompts Swift to create a new copy of the array at the point that you append the new value. Henceforth, a is a separate, independent copy of the array.

Whenever you change the length, it has to create a new array, (which changes the reference to the array).

So b and c will now point to the old array, and a points to the newly created array.

Advantages to this approach

Array provides C-like performance when you work with an array’s contents and copies an array’s contents only when copying is necessary.

In Python an array is initialized with some extra space so that appending a few elements doesn't require an array resize/copy. Why doesn't Swift do this?

One potential drawback of "padding" your arrays is that when your CPU fetches a page from memory, there is more wasted space resulting in more cache misses than need be (cache misses are very expensive). Array copies on the other hand are relatively cheap (due to their contiguous nature).

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, Array in swift is a true array not a array list object or something. But I still hard to understand why Apple keep it in such high-level language. better performance? thread safety? –  DouO Jun 5 at 6:24
    
Python is a much higher level language than Swift (code is interpreted in real-time, not compiled), and it has "true arrays" as well. Lists are very bad performance wise, it wouldn't make sense to use them here. –  Martin Konecny Jun 5 at 6:34
    
append look like a method of "object" a,But it not just append a element to a also change a's reference. This is the error-prone point. python didn't have this problem. –  DouO Jun 5 at 7:16
1  
Any time an object moves in a multi-threaded framework, it is necessary to ensure that any references to the object's storage, in every thread, are updated "simultaneously" [from the point of view of the threads in question]. This is very expensive. If an object would need to move very often (e.g. because it needs to be resizable), it's cheaper to have have the data stored in an object to which the sole reference--anywhere in the universe--is contained in a single wrapper object, and handle resizing by having the wrapper make a new object and abandon the original. –  supercat Jun 7 at 16:54
    
I think the confusion in Swift is handled by the fact that resizing is handled by what looks like an array method invocation, rather than using a C#-style Array.Resize(ref theArray, newSize); The latter style of invocation makes clearer that the method may modify storage location theArray itself, rather than modifying the contents of the array identified thereby. –  supercat Jun 7 at 16:56

This behavior is explained in Swift's Assignment and Copy Behavior for Arrays.

Basically Array's have Copy on Modification semantics:

“For arrays, copying only takes place when you perform an action that has the potential to modify the length of the array. This includes appending, inserting, or removing items, or using a ranged subscript to replace a range of items in the array.”

Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “The Swift Programming Language.” iBooks. https://itun.es/us/jEUH0.l

The examples used in the Swift's Language Guide:

If you only modify elements in place, it doesn't create a new copy so the change is visible in all references to the array, e.g:

var a = [1, 2, 3]
var b = a
var c = a

a[0] = 42
println(a[0]) // 42
println(b[0]) // 42
println(c[0]) // 42

But if you change an array's length or modifies its structure it forces a new copy of the Array to be created, separate from the other references, i.e:

a.append(4)
a[0] = 777
println(a[0]) // 777
println(b[0]) // 42
println(c[0]) // 42
share|improve this answer
    
But why swift do that, Isn't it a error-prone feature? –  DouO Jun 5 at 4:00
    
@DouO you'll have to ask the Swift engineers, but my guesses are for performance and thread-safety –  mythz Jun 5 at 4:02

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