Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am learning GWT for web development and came across a piece of code I can't really understand.

helloBtn.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() {
    public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
        Window.alert("Hello!");
    }
});

If someone could explain to me what it is doing that would be great.

Thanks, John

share|improve this question

This is an anonymous inner class.

In this case, the code is declaring an unnamed class which implements the ClickHandler interface. When run, an instance of the class will be created and passed to addClickHandler.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. I'm new to Java coming from a PHP, JavaScript background so this really helps. – John Jacquay Mar 8 '10 at 22:22

I assume that the part you are having trouble with is the anonymous class. What is happening here is that you are calling the addClickHandler method on the helloBtn object and passing it an anonymous class instance.

The addClickHandler method takes an instance of the ClickHandler as an argument. The following code is creating the anonymous class that implements the ClickHandler interface.

new ClickHandler() {
public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
    Window.alert("Hello!");
}

You could imagine rewriting the code by first defining the class.

public class MyClickHandler implements ClickHandler {
  public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
    Window.alert("Hello!");
  }
}

Then creating an instance of the class and passing it to the addClickHandler method.

ClickHandler myClickHandler = new MyClickHandler();
helloBtn.addClickHandler(myClickHandler);
share|improve this answer

That's an anonymous class - as the name says, a class with no name that can be defined "on the fly". In your example code, it's used to implement the interface ClickHandler - this is Java's somewhat verbose idiom for callbacks. The same syntax can be used to extend classes.

share|improve this answer

Another way to rewrite your code without the use of an anonymous inner class is as follows:

ClickHandler myClickHandler = new ClickHandler() {
    public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
        Window.alert("Hello!");
    }
}

That creates a ClickHandler object, which can then be passed where you need them:

helloBtn.addClickHandler(myClickHandler);

This style would be helpful if you want to use the same ClickHandler for multiple items, so it could look something like this:

helloBtn1.addClickHandler(myClickHandler);
helloBtn2.addClickHandler(myClickHandler);
helloBtn3.addClickHandler(myClickHandler);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.