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I would like to do something like this:

public MyFunction(int integerParameter, string stringParameter){
    //Do this:
    LogParameters();
    //Instead of this:
    //Log.Debug("integerParameter: " + integerParameter + 
    //          ", stringParameter: " + stringParameter);

}

public LogParameters(){
    //Look up 1 level in the call stack (if possible),
    //Programmatically loop through the function's parameters/values
    //and log them to a file (with the function name as well).
    //If I can pass a MethodInfo instead of analyzing the call stack, great.
}

I'm not even sure what I want to do is possible, but it would be very nice to be able to automatically output parameter names/values at runtime to a file without explicitly writing the code to log them.

Is it possible?

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2  
Close-to-duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/135782/… –  Peter Lillevold Mar 8 '10 at 22:32
    
...and this stackoverflow.com/questions/819576/… –  Peter Lillevold Mar 8 '10 at 22:32
    
Dupe of stackoverflow.com/questions/1820630/… –  Austin Salonen Mar 8 '10 at 22:33

6 Answers 6

It's theoretically possible with a debug build and optimization turned off, but practically speaking, I suggest you want some source code rewriting pass.

People are going to keep telling you reflection will work when it won't, so here is the function that's actually capable of getting argument values. It's not likely to work reliably with optimization enabled (for example, there might not even be a stack frame when inlining is on) and getting a debugger installed so you can call that function won't be nearly as simple as you were hoping.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually - very good point on the optimization - I was assuming this question was related to debug instrumentation.... –  Paul Kohler Mar 8 '10 at 22:39
1  
@Ben Voigt - do you have a sample usage for ICorDebugILFrame::GetArgument? –  Paul Kohler Mar 8 '10 at 22:41
    
@Ben Voigt - I'd like to see a sample usage as well, if you can provide it. Thanks for the answer! –  Pwninstein Mar 9 '10 at 12:33
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I realize people linked to other questions which mentioned PostSharp, but I couldn't help posting the code that solved my problem (using PostSharp) so other people could benefit from it.

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Trace.Listeners.Add(new TextWriterTraceListener(Console.Out));
        new MyClass().MyMethod(44, "asdf qwer 1234", 3.14f, true);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
public class MyClass {
    public MyClass() {
    }
    [Trace("Debug")]
    public int MyMethod(int x, string someString, float anotherFloat, bool theBool) {
        return x + 1;
    }
}
[Serializable]
public sealed class TraceAttribute : OnMethodBoundaryAspect {
    private readonly string category;

    public TraceAttribute(string category) {
        this.category = category;
    }

    public string Category { get { return category; } }

    public override void OnEntry(MethodExecutionArgs args) {
        Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("Entering {0}.{1}.", 
                                      args.Method.DeclaringType.Name, 
                                      args.Method.Name), category);

        for (int x = 0; x < args.Arguments.Count; x++) {
            Trace.WriteLine(args.Method.GetParameters()[x].Name + " = " + 
                            args.Arguments.GetArgument(x));
        }
    }

    public override void OnExit(MethodExecutionArgs args) {
        Trace.WriteLine("Return Value: " + args.ReturnValue);

        Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("Leaving {0}.{1}.", 
                                      args.Method.DeclaringType.Name, 
                                      args.Method.Name), category);
    }
} 

Simply adding the Trace attribute to a method will cause very nice debugging information to be output, like so:

Debug: Entering MyClass.MyMethod. 
x = 44
someString = asdf qwer 1234
anotherFloat = 3.14
theBool = True
Return Value: 45
Debug: Leaving MyClass.MyMethod.
share|improve this answer
2  
is this possible with the express version of postsharp (which is free of charge)? –  Andreas Müller Apr 15 '14 at 9:05
StackTrace stackTrace = new StackTrace();
ParameterInfo[] parameters = stackTrace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod().GetParameters();

Note, GetFrame(1) gets the calling method rather than the current method. This should give you your desired results and allow you to execute the code below in LogParameters().

You would need to call LogParameters like below since you wouldn't be able to get the reflected values of integerParameter and stringParameter from ParameterInfo.

LogParameters(integerParameter, stringParameter);
share|improve this answer
    
Definately use a StackTrace to get the relevant StackFrame, this even allows declaring the "logging" subroutine with an optional "depth" argument. +1 –  M.A. Hanin Mar 8 '10 at 22:33
6  
oh great, people deleted the answer where I first mentioned StackTrace.GetFrame(1) and its limitations. –  Ben Voigt Mar 8 '10 at 22:40
    
The update provides the values, but there are a few things that can go wrong. First, it's a maintenance burden -- any changes to the parameter list have to be repeated in the logging call. Secondly, you have to jump through a few extra hoops if your original function has a single parameter of type object[]. –  Ben Voigt Jul 23 '14 at 16:51

This is the Utility class that creates the log.

internal class ParamaterLogModifiedUtility
{
    private  String _methodName;
    private String _paramaterLog;

    private readonly JavaScriptSerializer _serializer;
    private readonly Dictionary<String, Type> _methodParamaters;
    private readonly List<Tuple<String, Type, object>>_providedParametars;

    public ParamaterLogModifiedUtility(params Expression<Func<object>>[] providedParameters)
    {
        try
        {
            _serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
            var currentMethod = new StackTrace().GetFrame(1).GetMethod();

            /*Set class and current method info*/
            _methodName = String.Format("Class = {0}, Method = {1}", currentMethod.DeclaringType.FullName, currentMethod.Name);

            /*Get current methods paramaters*/
            _methodParamaters = new Dictionary<string, Type>();
            (from aParamater in currentMethod.GetParameters()
             select new { Name = aParamater.Name, DataType = aParamater.ParameterType })
             .ToList()
             .ForEach(obj => _methodParamaters.Add(obj.Name, obj.DataType));

            /*Get provided methods paramaters*/
            _providedParametars = new List<Tuple<string, Type, object>>();
            foreach (var aExpression in providedParameters)
            {
                Expression bodyType = aExpression.Body;

                if (bodyType is MemberExpression)
                {
                    AddProvidedParamaterDetail((MemberExpression)aExpression.Body);
                }
                else if (bodyType is UnaryExpression)
                {
                    UnaryExpression unaryExpression = (UnaryExpression)aExpression.Body;
                    AddProvidedParamaterDetail((MemberExpression)unaryExpression.Operand);
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new Exception("Expression type unknown.");
                }
            }

            /*Process log for all method parameters*/
            ProcessLog();

        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            throw new Exception("Error in paramater log processing.", exception);
        }
    }

    private void ProcessLog()
    {
        try
        {
            foreach (var aMethodParamater in _methodParamaters)
            {
                var aParameter =
                    _providedParametars.Where(
                        obj => obj.Item1.Equals(aMethodParamater.Key) && obj.Item2 == aMethodParamater.Value).Single();
                _paramaterLog += String.Format(@" ""{0}"":{1},", aParameter.Item1, _serializer.Serialize(aParameter.Item3));
            }
            _paramaterLog = (_paramaterLog != null) ? _paramaterLog.Trim(' ', ',') : string.Empty;
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            throw new Exception("MathodParamater is not found in providedParameters.");
        }
    }

    private void AddProvidedParamaterDetail(MemberExpression memberExpression)
    {
        ConstantExpression constantExpression = (ConstantExpression) memberExpression.Expression;
        var name = memberExpression.Member.Name;
        var value = ((FieldInfo) memberExpression.Member).GetValue(constantExpression.Value);
        var type = value.GetType();
        _providedParametars.Add(new Tuple<string, Type, object>(name, type, value));
    }


    public String GetLog()
    {
        return String.Format("{0}({1})", _methodName, _paramaterLog);
    }

}

Using the Utility

class PersonLogic
{
    public bool Add(PersonEntity aPersonEntity, ushort age = 12, String id = "1", String name = "Roy")
    {
        string log =  new ParamaterLogModifiedUtility(() => aPersonEntity, () => age, () => id, () => name).GetLog();
        return true;
    }
}

Now Calling the Usages

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            PersonLogic personLogic = new PersonLogic();
            personLogic.Add(id: "1", age: 24, name: "Dipon", aPersonEntity: new PersonEntity() { Id = "1", Name = "Dipon", Age = 24 });
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Error.");
        }
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Result Log:

        Class = MethodParamatersLog.Logic.PersonLogic, Method = Add("aPersonEntity":{"CreatedDateTime":"\/Date(1383422468353)\/","Id":"1","Name":"Dipon","Age":24}, "age":24, "id":"1", "name":"Dipon")
share|improve this answer

Unless you use the debugger API, you cannot loop through parameter values of a different method on the call stack. Though you can get the parameter names from the callstack (as others have mentioned).

The closest thing would be:

public MyFunction(int integerParameter, string stringParameter){
    LogParameters(integerParameter, stringParameter);
}

public void LogParameters(params object[] values){
    // Get the parameter names from callstack and log names/values
}
share|improve this answer
    
you CAN, you just need the debugging API, not reflection –  Ben Voigt Mar 8 '10 at 22:33
    
This approach is a neat idea, but there are a few things that can go wrong. First, it's a maintenance burden -- any changes to the parameter list have to be repeated in the logging call. Secondly, you have to jump through a few extra hoops if your original function has a single parameter of type object[]. –  Ben Voigt Jul 23 '14 at 16:50
    
@BenVoigt - yes, that's why I would use AOP to do such a thing these days. –  Peter Lillevold Jul 25 '14 at 8:22

Followe instructions and created this class

public static class Tracer
{
public static void Parameters(params object[] parameters)
{
    #if DEBUG
    var jss = new JavaScriptSerializer();

    var stackTrace = new StackTrace();

    var paramInfos = stackTrace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod().GetParameters();

    var callingMethod = stackTrace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod();
    Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("[Func: {0}", callingMethod.DeclaringType.FullName + "." + callingMethod.Name + "]"));

    for (int i = 0; i < paramInfos.Count(); i++)
    {
        var currentParameterInfo = paramInfos[i];

        var currentParameter = parameters[i];

        Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("    Parameter: {0}", currentParameterInfo.Name));

        Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("    Value: {0}", jss.Serialize(currentParameter)));
    }
    Debug.WriteLine("[End Func]");
    #endif
  }
}

Call it like this

    public void Send<T>(T command) where T : Command
    {
        Tracer.Parameters(command);            
    }

And the output looks like this

[Func: SimpleCQRS.FakeBus.Send] 
    Parameter: command
    Value: {"InventoryItemId":"f7005197-bd20-42a6-b35a-15a6dcc23c33","Name":"test record"}
[End Func]

Editing ......... And Extended my Tracer function to really do great job for me. To trace every function and its calling function. etc. you can use StrackTrace.GetFrame(2) to use added functionality. And Now my output is much richer. I also used Json.net's library to output nice looking formatted json objects. Also The output can be pasted in a empty js file and see colorized output.

Now my output looks like this

//Func: HomeController(Constructor): CQRSGui.Controllers.HomeController(Constructor)
//From: RuntimeTypeHandle.CreateInstance: System.RuntimeTypeHandle.CreateInstance
var parameters = {}

//Func: HomeController.Add: CQRSGui.Controllers.HomeController.Add
//From: System.Object lambda_method(System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Closure, System.Web.Mvc.ControllerBase, System.Object[])
var parameters = {
    "name": "car"
}

//Func: Command(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.Command(Constructor)
//From: CreateInventoryItem(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.CreateInventoryItem(Constructor)
var parameters = {}

//Func: CreateInventoryItem(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.CreateInventoryItem(Constructor)
//From: HomeController.Add: CQRSGui.Controllers.HomeController.Add
var parameters = {
    "inventoryItemId": "d974cd27-430d-4b22-ad9d-22ea0e6a2559",
    "name": "car"
}

//Func: FakeBus.Send: SimpleCQRS.FakeBus.Send
//From: HomeController.Add: CQRSGui.Controllers.HomeController.Add
var parameters = {
    "command": {
        "InventoryItemId": "d974cd27-430d-4b22-ad9d-22ea0e6a2559",
        "Name": "car"
    }
}

//Func: InventoryCommandHandlers.Handle: SimpleCQRS.InventoryCommandHandlers.Handle
//From: FakeBus.Send: SimpleCQRS.FakeBus.Send
var parameters = {
    "message": {
        "InventoryItemId": "d974cd27-430d-4b22-ad9d-22ea0e6a2559",
        "Name": "car"
    }
}

//Func: AggregateRoot(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.AggregateRoot(Constructor)
//From: InventoryItem(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.InventoryItem(Constructor)
var parameters = {}

//Func: InventoryItem(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.InventoryItem(Constructor)
//From: InventoryCommandHandlers.Handle: SimpleCQRS.InventoryCommandHandlers.Handle
var parameters = {
    "id": "d974cd27-430d-4b22-ad9d-22ea0e6a2559",
    "name": "car"
}

//Func: Event(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.Event(Constructor)
//From: InventoryItemCreated(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.InventoryItemCreated(Constructor)
var parameters = {}

//Func: InventoryItemCreated(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.InventoryItemCreated(Constructor)
//From: InventoryItem(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.InventoryItem(Constructor)
var parameters = {
    "id": "d974cd27-430d-4b22-ad9d-22ea0e6a2559",
    "name": "car"
}

//Func: AggregateRoot.ApplyChange: SimpleCQRS.AggregateRoot.ApplyChange
//From: InventoryItem(Constructor): SimpleCQRS.InventoryItem(Constructor)
var parameters = {
    "event": {
        "Id": "d974cd27-430d-4b22-ad9d-22ea0e6a2559",
        "Name": "car",
        "Version": 0
    }
}

Powerful isn't it. I just need to see output and dont need to break application again and again and dont need to check into watch and local windows. I love this way. I have put tracker.Parameters function in everywhere in my app and I have now automatically debugged app.

One thing which I added to my outputting function was call Error Event in serialization. And handled that from json.net. Actually you can fall into circular reference error. Which I caught. And also if there are more serialization errors you can catch them and then you can display serialization errors just below the parameters object output.

thanks

share|improve this answer
    
This approach is a neat idea, but there are a few things that can go wrong. First, it's a maintenance burden -- any changes to the parameter list have to be repeated in the logging call. Secondly, you have to jump through a few extra hoops if your original function has a single parameter of type object[]. –  Ben Voigt Jul 23 '14 at 16:49

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