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Is there a good way to remove HTML from a Java string? A simple regex like

 replaceAll("\\<.*?>","")

will work, but things like

&amp;

wont be converted correctly and non-HTML between the two angle brackets will be removed (ie the .*? in the regex will disappear).

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22 Answers 22

up vote 246 down vote accepted

This is actually dead simple with Jsoup.

public static String html2text(String html) {
    return Jsoup.parse(html).text();
}
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13  
Jsoup is nice, but I encountered some drawbacks with it. I use it to get rid of XSS, so basically I expect a plain text input, but some evil person could try to send me some HTML. Using Jsoup, I can remove all HTML but, unfortunately it also shrinks many spaces to one and removes link breaks (\n characters) –  Ridcully Jul 31 '10 at 9:57
3  
@Ridcully: for that you'd like to use Jsoup#clean() instead. –  BalusC Aug 6 '10 at 18:24
3  
using clean() will still cause extra spaces and \n chars to be removed. ex: Jsoup.clean("a \n b", Whitelist.none()) returns "a b" –  Keith May 1 '11 at 22:15
7  
@Zeroows: this fails miserably on <p>Lorem ipsum 1 < 3 dolor sit amet</p>. Again, HTML is not a regular language. It's completely beyond me why everyone keeps trying to throw regex on it to parse parts of interest instead of using a real parser. –  BalusC Mar 5 '13 at 14:24
3  
why was this downvoted ? +1 –  PermGenError Jun 28 '13 at 13:52

If you're writing for Android you can do this...

android.text.Html.fromHtml(instruction).toString()
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4  
Awesome tip. :) If you're displaying the text in a TextView, you can drop the .toString() to preserve some formatting, too. –  Lorne Laliberte Mar 16 '12 at 3:40
    
Wow, thanks for this tip. Completely awesome. –  Tastybrownies Mar 8 at 21:38
    
Dont' works for spans and other web contents –  Maverick Jun 14 at 7:23
    
@Maverick it works for spans too –  Branky Aug 7 at 7:00
    
@Branky It doesn't I have tried...the accepted answer works like charm –  Maverick Aug 7 at 13:11

If the user enters <b>hey!</b>, do you want to display <b>hey!</b> or hey!? If the first, escape less-thans, and html-encode ampersands (and optionally quotes) and you're fine. A modification to your code to implement the second option would be:

replaceAll("\\<[^>]*>","")

but you will run into issues if the user enters something malformed, like <bhey!</b>.

You can also check out JTidy which will parse "dirty" html input, and should give you a way to remove the tags, keeping the text.

The problem with trying to strip html is that browser have very lenient parsers, more lenient than any library you can find will, so even if you do your best to strip all tags (using the replace method above, a DOM library, or JTidy), you will still need to make sure to encode any remaining HTMl special characters to keep your output safe.

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Another way is to use javax.swing.text.html.HTMLEditorKit to extract the text.

import java.io.*;
import javax.swing.text.html.*;
import javax.swing.text.html.parser.*;

public class Html2Text extends HTMLEditorKit.ParserCallback {
    StringBuffer s;

    public Html2Text() {
    }

    public void parse(Reader in) throws IOException {
        s = new StringBuffer();
        ParserDelegator delegator = new ParserDelegator();
        // the third parameter is TRUE to ignore charset directive
        delegator.parse(in, this, Boolean.TRUE);
    }

    public void handleText(char[] text, int pos) {
        s.append(text);
    }

    public String getText() {
        return s.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            // the HTML to convert
            FileReader in = new FileReader("java-new.html");
            Html2Text parser = new Html2Text();
            parser.parse(in);
            in.close();
            System.out.println(parser.getText());
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

ref : Remove HTML tags from a file to extract only the TEXT

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2  
The result of "a < b or b > c" is "a b or b > c", which seems unfortunate. –  dfrankow Aug 12 '10 at 22:56

HTML Escaping is really hard to do right- I'd definitely suggest using library code to do this, as it's a lot more subtle than you'd think. Check out Apache's StringEscapeUtils for a pretty good library for handling this in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the sort of thing I'm looking for but I want to strip the HTML instead of escaping it. –  Mason Oct 27 '08 at 17:12
    
do you want to strip the html, or do you want to convert it to plain text? Stripping the HTML from a long string with br tags and HTML entities can result in an illegible mess. –  Tim Howland Oct 27 '08 at 17:52
    
Have you tried StringEscapeUtils.unescapeHtml? from commons-lang? –  Rafael Sanches Feb 16 '12 at 18:32
1  
StringEscapeUtils.unescapeHtml does not strip html –  Erin Drummond Aug 16 '12 at 3:04
1  
Good information on utils to use for unescaping but not answering the question. –  Alex Jun 18 at 5:33

Also very simple using Jericho, and you can retain some of the formatting (line breaks and links, for example).

    Source htmlSource = new Source(htmlText);
    Segment htmlSeg = new Segment(htmlSource, 0, htmlSource.length());
    Renderer htmlRend = new Renderer(htmlSeg);
    System.out.println(htmlRend.toString());
share|improve this answer
2  
Jericho was able to parse <br> to a line break. Jsoup and HTMLEditorKit could not do that. –  homaxto Aug 24 '11 at 14:49
    
Jericho is very capable of doing this job, used it a lot in owned projects. –  Jerry Tian May 24 '12 at 1:40

I think that the simpliest way to filter the html tags is:

private static final Pattern REMOVE_TAGS = Pattern.compile("<.+?>");

public static String removeTags(String string) {
    if (string == null || string.length() == 0) {
        return string;
    }

    Matcher m = REMOVE_TAGS.matcher(string);
    return m.replaceAll("");
}
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You might want to replace <br/> and </p> tags with newlines before stripping the HTML to prevent it becoming an illegible mess as Tim suggests.

The only way I can think of removing HTML tags but leaving non-HTML between angle brackets would be check against a list of HTML tags. Something along these lines...

replaceAll("\\<[\s]*tag[^>]*>","")

Then HTML-decode special characters such as &amp;. The result should not be considered to be sanitized.

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The accepted answer did not work for me for the test case I indicated: the result of "a < b or b > c" is "a b or b > c".

So, I used TagSoup instead. Here's a shot that worked for my test case (and a couple of others):

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.StringReader;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

import org.ccil.cowan.tagsoup.Parser;
import org.xml.sax.Attributes;
import org.xml.sax.ContentHandler;
import org.xml.sax.InputSource;
import org.xml.sax.Locator;
import org.xml.sax.SAXException;
import org.xml.sax.XMLReader;

/**
 * Take HTML and give back the text part while dropping the HTML tags.
 *
 * There is some risk that using TagSoup means we'll permute non-HTML text.
 * However, it seems to work the best so far in test cases.
 *
 * @author dan
 * @see <a href="http://home.ccil.org/~cowan/XML/tagsoup/">TagSoup</a> 
 */
public class Html2Text2 implements ContentHandler {
private StringBuffer sb;

public Html2Text2() {
}

public void parse(String str) throws IOException, SAXException {
    XMLReader reader = new Parser();
    reader.setContentHandler(this);
    sb = new StringBuffer();
    reader.parse(new InputSource(new StringReader(str)));
}

public String getText() {
    return sb.toString();
}

@Override
public void characters(char[] ch, int start, int length)
    throws SAXException {
    for (int idx = 0; idx < length; idx++) {
    sb.append(ch[idx+start]);
    }
}

@Override
public void ignorableWhitespace(char[] ch, int start, int length)
    throws SAXException {
    sb.append(ch);
}

// The methods below do not contribute to the text
@Override
public void endDocument() throws SAXException {
}

@Override
public void endElement(String uri, String localName, String qName)
    throws SAXException {
}

@Override
public void endPrefixMapping(String prefix) throws SAXException {
}


@Override
public void processingInstruction(String target, String data)
    throws SAXException {
}

@Override
public void setDocumentLocator(Locator locator) {
}

@Override
public void skippedEntity(String name) throws SAXException {
}

@Override
public void startDocument() throws SAXException {
}

@Override
public void startElement(String uri, String localName, String qName,
    Attributes atts) throws SAXException {
}

@Override
public void startPrefixMapping(String prefix, String uri)
    throws SAXException {
}
}
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it worked for me. try it.

android.text.Html.fromHtml(instruction).toString()
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One more way can be to use com.google.gdata.util.common.html.HtmlToText class like

MyWriter.toConsole(HtmlToText.htmlToPlainText(htmlResponse));

This is not bullet proof code though and when I run it on wikipedia entries I am getting style info also. However I believe for small/simple jobs this would be effective.

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I know this is old, but I was just working on a project that required me to filter HTML and this worked fine:

noHTMLString.replaceAll("\\&.*?\\;", "");

instead of this:

html = html.replaceAll("&nbsp;","");
html = html.replaceAll("&amp;"."");
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It sounds like you want to go from HTML to plain text.
If that is the case look at www.htmlparser.org. Here is an example that strips all the tags out from the html file found at a URL.
It makes use of org.htmlparser.beans.StringBean.

static public String getUrlContentsAsText(String url) {
    String content = "";
    StringBean stringBean = new StringBean();
    stringBean.setURL(url);
    content = stringBean.getStrings();
    return content;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a lightly more fleshed out update to try to handle some formatting for breaks and lists. I used Amaya's output as a guide.

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.Reader;
import java.io.StringReader;
import java.util.Stack;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

import javax.swing.text.MutableAttributeSet;
import javax.swing.text.html.HTML;
import javax.swing.text.html.HTMLEditorKit;
import javax.swing.text.html.parser.ParserDelegator;

public class HTML2Text extends HTMLEditorKit.ParserCallback {
    private static final Logger log = Logger
            .getLogger(Logger.GLOBAL_LOGGER_NAME);

    private StringBuffer stringBuffer;

    private Stack<IndexType> indentStack;

    public static class IndexType {
        public String type;
        public int counter; // used for ordered lists

        public IndexType(String type) {
            this.type = type;
            counter = 0;
        }
    }

    public HTML2Text() {
        stringBuffer = new StringBuffer();
        indentStack = new Stack<IndexType>();
    }

    public static String convert(String html) {
        HTML2Text parser = new HTML2Text();
        Reader in = new StringReader(html);
        try {
            // the HTML to convert
            parser.parse(in);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            log.severe(e.getMessage());
        } finally {
            try {
                in.close();
            } catch (IOException ioe) {
                // this should never happen
            }
        }
        return parser.getText();
    }

    public void parse(Reader in) throws IOException {
        ParserDelegator delegator = new ParserDelegator();
        // the third parameter is TRUE to ignore charset directive
        delegator.parse(in, this, Boolean.TRUE);
    }

    public void handleStartTag(HTML.Tag t, MutableAttributeSet a, int pos) {
        log.info("StartTag:" + t.toString());
        if (t.toString().equals("p")) {
            if (stringBuffer.length() > 0
                    && !stringBuffer.substring(stringBuffer.length() - 1)
                            .equals("\n")) {
                newLine();
            }
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("ol")) {
            indentStack.push(new IndexType("ol"));
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("ul")) {
            indentStack.push(new IndexType("ul"));
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("li")) {
            IndexType parent = indentStack.peek();
            if (parent.type.equals("ol")) {
                String numberString = "" + (++parent.counter) + ".";
                stringBuffer.append(numberString);
                for (int i = 0; i < (4 - numberString.length()); i++) {
                    stringBuffer.append(" ");
                }
            } else {
                stringBuffer.append("*   ");
            }
            indentStack.push(new IndexType("li"));
        } else if (t.toString().equals("dl")) {
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("dt")) {
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("dd")) {
            indentStack.push(new IndexType("dd"));
            newLine();
        }
    }

    private void newLine() {
        stringBuffer.append("\n");
        for (int i = 0; i < indentStack.size(); i++) {
            stringBuffer.append("    ");
        }
    }

    public void handleEndTag(HTML.Tag t, int pos) {
        log.info("EndTag:" + t.toString());
        if (t.toString().equals("p")) {
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("ol")) {
            indentStack.pop();
            ;
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("ul")) {
            indentStack.pop();
            ;
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("li")) {
            indentStack.pop();
            ;
            newLine();
        } else if (t.toString().equals("dd")) {
            indentStack.pop();
            ;
        }
    }

    public void handleSimpleTag(HTML.Tag t, MutableAttributeSet a, int pos) {
        log.info("SimpleTag:" + t.toString());
        if (t.toString().equals("br")) {
            newLine();
        }
    }

    public void handleText(char[] text, int pos) {
        log.info("Text:" + new String(text));
        stringBuffer.append(text);
    }

    public String getText() {
        return stringBuffer.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        String html = "<html><body><p>paragraph at start</p>hello<br />What is happening?<p>this is a<br />mutiline paragraph</p><ol>  <li>This</li>  <li>is</li>  <li>an</li>  <li>ordered</li>  <li>list    <p>with</p>    <ul>      <li>another</li>      <li>list        <dl>          <dt>This</dt>          <dt>is</dt>            <dd>sdasd</dd>            <dd>sdasda</dd>            <dd>asda              <p>aasdas</p>            </dd>            <dd>sdada</dd>          <dt>fsdfsdfsd</dt>        </dl>        <dl>          <dt>vbcvcvbcvb</dt>          <dt>cvbcvbc</dt>            <dd>vbcbcvbcvb</dd>          <dt>cvbcv</dt>          <dt></dt>        </dl>        <dl>          <dt></dt>        </dl></li>      <li>cool</li>    </ul>    <p>stuff</p>  </li>  <li>cool</li></ol><p></p></body></html>";
        System.out.println(convert(html));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The accepted answer of doing simply Jsoup.parse(html).text() has 2 potential issues (with JSoup 1.7.3):

  • It removes line breaks from the text
  • It converts text &lt;script&gt; into <script>

If you use this to protect against XSS, this is a bit annoying. Here is my best shot at an improved solution, using both JSoup and Apache StringEscapeUtils:

// breaks multi-level of escaping, preventing &amp;lt;script&amp;gt; to be rendered as <script>
String replace = input.replace("&amp;", "");
// decode any encoded html, preventing &lt;script&gt; to be rendered as <script>
String html = StringEscapeUtils.unescapeHtml(replace);
// remove all html tags, but maintain line breaks
String clean = Jsoup.clean(html, "", Whitelist.none(), new Document.OutputSettings().prettyPrint(false));
// decode html again to convert character entities back into text
return StringEscapeUtils.unescapeHtml(clean);

Note that the last step is because I need to use the output as plain text. If you need only HTML output then you should be able to remove it.

And here is a bunch of test cases (input to output):

{"regular string", "regular string"},
{"<a href=\"link\">A link</a>", "A link"},
{"<script src=\"http://evil.url.com\"/>", ""},
{"&lt;script&gt;", ""},
{"&amp;lt;script&amp;gt;", "lt;scriptgt;"}, // best effort
{"\" ' > < \n \\ é å à ü and & preserved", "\" ' > < \n \\ é å à ü and & preserved"}

If you find a way to make it better, please let me know.

share|improve this answer

Here is another way to do it:

public static String removeHTML(String input) {
    int i = 0;
    String[] str = input.split("");

    String s = "";
    boolean inTag = false;

    for (i = input.indexOf("<"); i < input.indexOf(">"); i++) {
        inTag = true;
    }
    if (!inTag) {
        for (i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
            s = s + str[i];
        }
    }
    return s;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or you can just say, if(input.indexOf("<") > 0 || input.indexOf(">") > 0) return ""; else return input; –  Hossein Shahdoost Apr 21 '13 at 11:49

My 5 cents:

String[] temp = yourString.split("&amp;");
String tmp = "";
if (temp.length > 1) {

    for (int i = 0; i < temp.length; i++) {
        tmp += temp[i] + "&";
    }
    yourString = tmp.substring(0, tmp.length() - 1);
}
share|improve this answer

One could also use Apache Tika for this purpose. By default it preserves whitespaces from the stripped html, which may be desired in certain situations:

InputStream htmlInputStream = ..
HtmlParser htmlParser = new HtmlParser();
HtmlContentHandler htmlContentHandler = new HtmlContentHandler();
htmlParser.parse(htmlInputStream, htmlContentHandler, new Metadata())
System.out.println(htmlContentHandler.getBodyText().trim())
share|improve this answer

To get formateed plain html text you can do that:

String BR_ESCAPED = "&lt;br/&gt;";
Element el=Jsoup.parse(html).select("body");
el.select("br").append(BR_ESCAPED);
el.select("p").append(BR_ESCAPED+BR_ESCAPED);
el.select("h1").append(BR_ESCAPED+BR_ESCAPED);
el.select("h2").append(BR_ESCAPED+BR_ESCAPED);
el.select("h3").append(BR_ESCAPED+BR_ESCAPED);
el.select("h4").append(BR_ESCAPED+BR_ESCAPED);
el.select("h5").append(BR_ESCAPED+BR_ESCAPED);
String nodeValue=el.text();
nodeValue=nodeValue.replaceAll(BR_ESCAPED, "<br/>");
nodeValue=nodeValue.replaceAll("(\\s*<br[^>]*>){3,}", "<br/><br/>");

To get formateed plain text change <br/> by \n and change last line by:

nodeValue=nodeValue.replaceAll("(\\s*\n){3,}", "<br/><br/>");
share|improve this answer

Alternatively, one can use HtmlCleaner:

private CharSequence removeHtmlFrom(String html) {
    return new HtmlCleaner().clean(html).getText();
}
share|improve this answer

Remove HTML tags from string. Somewhere we need to parse some string which is received by some responses like Httpresponse from the server.

So we need to parse it.

Here I will show how to remove html tags from string.

    // sample text with tags

    string str = "<html><head>sdfkashf sdf</head><body>sdfasdf</body></html>";



    // regex which match tags

    System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex rx = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex("<[^>]*>");



    // replace all matches with empty strin

    str = rx.Replace(str, "");



    //now str contains string without html tags
share|improve this answer

you can simply make a method with multiple replaceAll() like

String RemoveTag(String html){
   html = html.replaceAll("\\<.*?>","")
   html = html.replaceAll("&nbsp;","");
   html = html.replaceAll("&amp;"."");
   ----------
   ----------
   return html;
}

Use this link for most common replacements you need: http://tunes.org/wiki/html_20special_20characters_20and_20symbols.html

It is simple but effective. I use this method first to remove the junk but not the very first line i.e replaceAll("\<.*?>",""), and later i use specific keywords to search for indexes and then use .substring(start, end) method to strip away unnecessary stuff. As this is more robust and you can pin point exactly what you need in the entire html page.

share|improve this answer
3  
Two notes. First, this is suboptimal - for each replaceAll call, Java will attempt to compile the first argument as a regex and run through the entire string to apply that regex to the string, processing a few dozen KB for a regular HTML page every time. Second, it's advised not to use replaceAll to replace simple (non-regex) strings, but instead use replace() (which also replaces all, unlike the name suggests). –  fwielstra Dec 23 '10 at 13:09

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