Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a code for client server model. It works fine if I pass value in program but when I tried to do it by passing address. I am making quite a few silly mistakes which i am not able to figure out. I have also tried to make 100 threads using pthreads concept,basic intention was that when a client side pings my server and sends message server echoes it back and it can assign any one of the 100 threads message that client has sent. but how to do this... i am still working on that.

Here is my code for server:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>    
#include <stdlib.h>    
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h> 
#include <unistd.h>    
#include <pthread.h>
#include <sys/ipc.h>
#include <sys/uio.h>
#define NTHREADS 100

void *connection_handler(void *);
pthread_t thread_id[NTHREADS];
pthread_mutex_t lock;
int service_count, sockfd,d1;
struct sockaddr_in server , client;

// Socket create
int sock_create( )
{
    sockfd= socket(AF_INET , SOCK_STREAM , 0);

    if (sockfd <0)
    {
        printf("Could not create socket");  
        return 1;
    }
    puts("Socket created");
    memset(&server,0,sizeof(server));
    server.sin_family = AF_INET;
    server.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
    server.sin_port = htons( 2100);

}      
// Bind
int sock_bind()
{
    int b= bind(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&server , sizeof(server));
    if (b <0)
    {
        perror("Bind failed. Error");
        return 1;
    }
    puts("Bind");

}
// Listen
int sock_listen()
{
   listen(sockfd , 10);
}
//Connection accept
int sock_accept()
{
    int s = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);
    d1= accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&client, (socklen_t*)&s);

    if (d1 < 0)
    {
        perror("accept failed");
        return 1;
    } 
    puts("Connection accepted");
}

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{  int client_sock;
   sock_create();
   sock_bind();
   sock_listen();
   sock_accept();

    pthread_attr_t attr;
    int i,j;
    pthread_attr_init(&attr);
    pthread_attr_setdetachstate(&attr, PTHREAD_CREATE_JOINABLE);
    printf("Creating threads\n");

    int cli_sock=client_sock;

    for (i = 0; i < NTHREADS ; i++)
    {
        pthread_create(&(thread_id[i]), &attr, connection_handler, (void*) &cli_sock);
    }

    pthread_attr_destroy(&attr); //Free attribute, wait for the other threads
    for(j=0; j < NTHREADS; j++)
    {
        pthread_join( thread_id[j], NULL);
    }
    pthread_exit(NULL);
    return 0;
}

void *connection_handler(void *sfd)
{   
    int sock = d1;
    int read_size=0;
    char *message , client_message[2000];

    //Receive msg from client
    while( (read_size = recv(sock , client_message , 2000 , 0)) > 0 )
    {   
        client_message[read_size] = '\0';
        //back to client
        write(sock, client_message , strlen(client_message));
        memset(client_message,'\0',sizeof(client_message));
        memset(client_message, 0, 2000);    
    }
     if(read_size == 0)
    {
        puts("Client disconnected");
        fflush(stdout);
    }
    else if(read_size == -1)
    {
        perror("Recv failed");    
    }
    pthread_mutex_lock(&lock);
    service_count++;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&lock);

    pthread_exit((void*) sfd);
    return 0;
}

my client code is:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in servaddr;
    char msg[1000] , servaddr_reply[2000];


    if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0)) <0)
    {
        printf("Could not create socket\n");
        return 1;
    }
    puts("Socket created");

    servaddr.sin_family= AF_INET;
    servaddr.sin_port= htons(2100);
    servaddr.sin_addr.s_addr= inet_addr("10.205.28.13");

    if (connect(sockfd , (struct sockaddr *)&servaddr , sizeof(servaddr)) <0)
    {
        perror("Connection failed\n");
        return 1;
    }
    puts("Connected");

    while(1)
    {
        printf("Enter msg:");
        scanf("%s" , msg);

        if( send(sockfd , msg , strlen(msg) , 0) < 0)
        {
            puts("Send failed");
            return 1;
        }
         // server reply
        if( recv(sockfd, servaddr_reply , 2000 , 0) < 0)
        {
            puts("Recv failed");
            break;
        }
        puts("Echo: ");
        puts(servaddr_reply);              
    }
        close (sockfd);
        return 0;
}

now when my client is suppose sending hello server replies hello again if i enter message hi sever echoes back hillo .... cant figure out why?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Also why you take extra variables to assign socket descriptor? like int a, b, c, d? where you used? you used only global variable *d1 in your handler which is not initialized because

int sock_accept(int *d1) function give first priority to local one.

Also i see issue in your following code

int b = bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &server, sizeof(server));
               ^
               |............. where you initialized?

same for below code

int d = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &client, (socklen_t*) &s);

Also i see below meaning less code

  sock_create(&a);
  sock_bind(&b);
  sock_listen(&c);
  sock_accept(&d);

where you used a,b,c,d? because for communication you already taken sockfd and *d1.

You not need to pass any variable address to your function just make simple as follows

  sock_create();
  sock_bind();
  sock_listen();
  sock_accept();

And your code should be

int service_count, sockfd, d1;

// Socket create
int sock_create()
{
  sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

  if (sockfd < 0)
  {
    printf("Could not create socket");
    return 1;
  }
  puts("Socket created");
  memset(&server, 0, sizeof(server));
  server.sin_family = AF_INET;
  server.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
  server.sin_port = htons(2100);

}
// Bind
int sock_bind()
{
  int b = bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &server, sizeof(server));
  if (b < 0)
  {
    perror("Bind failed. Error");
    return 1;
  }
  puts("Bind");

}
// Listen
int sock_listen()
{
  listen(sockfd, 10);
}
//Connection accept
int sock_accept()
{
  int s = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);
  d1 = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &client, (socklen_t*) &s);

  if (d1 < 0)
  {
    perror("accept failed");
    return 1;
  }
  puts("Connection accepted");
}

now your handler should be

void *connection_handler(void *sfd)
{
  int sock = d1;
  int read_size = 0;
  char *message, client_message[2000];

  //Receive msg from client
  while ((read_size = recv(sock, client_message, 2000, 0)) > 0)
  {
    client_message[read_size] = '\0';
    //back to client
    write(sock, client_message, strlen(client_message));
    memset(client_message, '\0', sizeof(client_message));
    memset(client_message, 0, 2000);
  }
  if (read_size == 0)
  {
    puts("Client disconnected");
    fflush(stdout);
  }
  else if (read_size == -1)
  {
    perror("Recv failed");
  }
  pthread_mutex_lock(&lock);
  service_count++;
  pthread_mutex_unlock(&lock);

  pthread_exit((void*) sfd);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ok I got ur point... i have rectified and now trying to get rid of message problem... –  muskaan Jun 5 at 9:51
int sock_accept(int *d1)
{
    int s = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);
    int d= accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&client, (socklen_t*)&s);
    d1=&d;

This makes d1 point to the local stack variable d. Once sock_accept returns, the value can be overwritten, and d1 will point to some random data. Try using *d1 = d instead, and pass an integer variable to sock_accept

You're making similar mistakes in other locations in your code as well.

Additionally: You have a global d1 variable which is never initialized. I think perhaps you should do some basic pointer stuff first, then proceed to deal with sockets, and then proceed to use threads instead of introducing a lot of unfamiliar topics at once.

Too many issues with the question code, this answer doesn't address the crash asked about but various other issues.

share|improve this answer
    
rectified what u said... everywhere... still segmentation fault !!! –  muskaan Jun 5 at 8:43
    
d1 may point to wherever it likes -- it's local and not being reused inside sock_accept. Perhaps the OP wants to overwrite the value at the location d1 points to, i.e. *d1 = d; or whatever, but that's not what's happening. Afaics, main's d whose address is passed as the actual parameter to sock_accept is not being used at all later so that it doesn't matter whether its contents changes. –  Peter Schneider Jun 5 at 8:47

You try to free the pointer sfd at the end of your thread, but it's the address to client_sock which is on main's stack. That will most likely crash.

I think it's a good idea to let the creator of a resource destroy it, in general; e.g. if you hand an address to a function the function can generally not safely assume that it (a) points to dynamically allocated memory and (b) will not be used somewhere else later.

share|improve this answer
    
so if i simply remove statement which free my sfd pointer... it will be ok ?? –  muskaan Jun 5 at 8:46
    
Yes. That is, it may stop crashing, but you probably still want to check *d1 in sock_accept, not d1 itself (the address), and somehow communicate the descriptor up for later use. PLus fix the errors other people pointed out :-). –  Peter Schneider Jun 5 at 8:49
    
And, sorry to say -- you flagged the wrong answer as correct. Erik's observation is incorrect and irrelevant at the same time (that happens to the best of us). If you don't understand something sufficiently please refrain from voting and accepting because it lowers the quality and usefulness of SO as a whole. (I'm not being mean -- I do not understand many things and try to recognize that and then follow that guideline as well.) –  Peter Schneider Jun 5 at 8:52
    
thanx for the advice... :) –  muskaan Jun 5 at 8:57
    
Since d1 is a pointer to int, the cast is redundant (doesn't hurt but needs not be there). But I doubt that it's what you want to use. Don't you want to use the descriptor which is in the thread function's parameter sfd (which is never used)? Because you pass client_sock which sounds like the socket to read from. Make sure that client_sock is properly initialized.-- Generally I am under the impression that you are using code from somewhere without understanding it. Try to make the most simple (non-threaded) example work first. –  Peter Schneider Jun 5 at 9:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.