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I'm learning about async/await patterns in C#. Currently I'm trying to solve a problem like this:

  • There is a producer (a hardware device) that generates 1000 packets per second. I need to log this data to a file.

  • The device only has a ReadAsync() method to report a single packet at a time.

  • I need to buffer the packets and write them in the order they are generated to the file, only once a second.

  • Write operation should fail if the write process is not finished in time when the next batch of packets is ready to be written.

So far I have written something like below. It works but I am not sure if this is the best way to solve the problem. Any comments or suggestion? What is the best practice to approach this kind of Producer/Consumer problem where the consumer needs to aggregate the data received from the producer?

static async Task TestLogger(Device device, int seconds)
{
    const int bufLength = 1000;
    bool firstIteration = true;
    Task writerTask = null;

    using (var writer = new StreamWriter("test.log")))
    {
        do
        {
            var buffer = new byte[bufLength][];

            for (int i = 0; i < bufLength; i++)
            {
                buffer[i] = await device.ReadAsync();
            }

            if (!firstIteration)
            {
                if (!writerTask.IsCompleted)
                    throw new Exception("Write Time Out!");
            }

            writerTask = Task.Run(() =>
                {
                    foreach (var b in buffer)
                        writer.WriteLine(ToHexString(b));
                });

            firstIteration = false;
        } while (--seconds > 0);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
What determines the readiness of the buffer: the number of packets, or the time frame? – avo Jun 5 '14 at 10:19
1  
Essentially, it does not matter: this is a hardware device and generates 1000 packets every seconds at very regular intervals. – AlefSin Jun 5 '14 at 10:29
1  
From a code-review perspective I have trouble verifying that your code is correct regarding race conditions. This is a sign that you haven't found a great design yet. Good code is simple to review. – usr Jun 5 '14 at 15:28
2  
@usr Sure, but that is basically the question I am asking: the above code has the basic functionality. Now what is the best way to implement it in a clear, maintainable way? – AlefSin Jun 5 '14 at 16:44
1  
@AlefSin I don't know. Just my impression. You're right in asking this question. – usr Jun 5 '14 at 17:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use the following idea, provided the criteria for flush is the number of packets (up to 1000). I did not test it. It makes use of Stephen Cleary's AsyncProducerConsumerQueue<T> featured in this question.

AsyncProducerConsumerQueue<byte[]> _queue;
Stream _stream;

// producer
async Task ReceiveAsync(CancellationToken token)
{
    while (true)
    {
       var list = new List<byte>();
       while (true)
       {
           token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested(token);
           var packet = await _device.ReadAsync(token);
           list.Add(packet);
           if (list.Count == 1000)
               break;
       }
       // push next batch
       await _queue.EnqueueAsync(list.ToArray(), token);
    }
}

// consumer
async Task LogAsync(CancellationToken token)
{
    Task previousFlush = Task.FromResult(0); 
    CancellationTokenSource cts = null;
    while (true)
    {
       token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested(token);
       // get next batch
       var nextBatch = await _queue.DequeueAsync(token);
       if (!previousFlush.IsCompleted)
       {
           cts.Cancel(); // cancel the previous flush if not ready
           throw new Exception("failed to flush on time.");
       }
       await previousFlush; // it's completed, observe for any errors
       // start flushing
       cts = CancellationTokenSource.CreateLinkedTokenSource(token);
       previousFlush = _stream.WriteAsync(nextBatch, 0, nextBatch.Count, cts.Token);
    }
}

If you don't want to fail the logger but rather prefer to cancel the flush and proceed to the next batch, you can do so with a minimal change to this code.

In response to @l3arnon comment:

  1. A packet is not a byte, it's byte[]. 2. You haven't used the OP's ToHexString. 3. AsyncProducerConsumerQueue is much less robust and tested than .Net's TPL Dataflow. 4. You await previousFlush for errors just after you throw an exception which makes that line redundant. etc. In short: I think the possible added value doesn't justify this very complicated solution.
  1. "A packet is not a byte, it's byte[]" - A packet is a byte, this is obvious from the OP's code: buffer[i] = await device.ReadAsync(). Then, a batch of packets is byte[].
  2. "You haven't used the OP's ToHexString." - The goal was to show how to use Stream.WriteAsync which natively accepts a cancellation token, instead of WriteLineAsync which doesn't allow cancellation. It's trivial to use ToHexString with Stream.WriteAsync and still take advantage of cancellation support:

    var hexBytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(ToHexString(nextBatch) + 
        Environment.NewLine);
    _stream.WriteAsync(hexBytes, 0, hexBytes.Length, token);
    
  3. "AsyncProducerConsumerQueue is much less robust and tested than .Net's TPL Dataflow" - I don't think this is a determined fact. However, if the OP is concerned about it, he can use regular BlockingCollection, which doesn't block the producer thread. It's OK to block the consumer thread while waiting for the next batch, because writing is done in parallel. As opposed to this, your TPL Dataflow version carries one redundant CPU and lock intensive operation: moving data from producer pipeline to writer pipleline with logAction.Post(packet), byte by byte. My code doesn't do that.

  4. "You await previousFlush for errors just after you throw an exception which makes that line redundant." - This line is not redundant. Perhaps, you're missing this point: previousFlush.IsCompleted can be true when previousFlush.IsFaulted or previousFlush.IsCancelled is also true. So, await previousFlush is relevant there to observe any errors on the completed tasks (e.g., a write failure), which otherwise will be lost.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @avo. The only question is, can the receiver get blocked at `_queue.EnqueueAsync()'? Since the producer is a hardware device, the receive task cannot be blocked to ensure no packet is lost. Otherwise I like your answer a lot. – AlefSin Jun 5 '14 at 12:46
    
@AlefSin, it's async, so it doesn't block a thread, by design. However, the await _queue.EnqueueAsync() continuation can be delayed until an async lock inside AsyncProducerConsumerQueue becomes available. I haven't studied Stephen's code, but I think it is a very fast operation, perhaps a few milliseconds. – avo Jun 5 '14 at 12:54
1  
@avo, why do you need AsyncProducerConsumerQueue here? IMO, you'd be fine with standard blocking BlockingCollection<T>, it may help reducing any added latency. Also, is Packet the same as byte in your code? – Noseratio Jun 5 '14 at 22:10
1  
@Noseratio, BlockingCollection<T> would work too. BlockingCollection.Take(token) can be used instead of await _queue.DequeueAsync(token). I replaced Packet with byte and further simplified the code. I'm leaving it up to @AlefSin to do performance tests and see if BlockingCollection works better. – avo Jun 6 '14 at 5:14
1  
@avo Sorry for my long delay. Finally after some tests and modifications to meet my other error handling needs, I decided that your answer provided the best building blocks for the solution. – AlefSin Jun 13 '14 at 7:20

A better approach IMHO would be to have 2 "workers", a producer and a consumer. The producer reads from the device and simply fills a list. The consumer "wakes up" every second and writes the batch to a file.

List<byte[]> _data = new List<byte[]>();

async Task Producer(Device device)
{
    while (true)
    {
        _data.Add(await device.ReadAsync());
    }
}

async Task Consumer(Device device)
{
    using (var writer = new StreamWriter("test.log")))
    {
        while (true)
        {
            Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            var batch = _data;
            _data = new List<byte[]>();
            foreach (var packet in batch)
            {
                writer.WriteLine(ToHexString(packet));

                if (watch.Elapsed >= TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1))
                {
                    throw new Exception("Write Time Out!");
                }
            }

            await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1) - watch.Elapsed);
        }
    }
}

The while (true) should probably be replaced by a system wide cancellation token.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'll wait and see if anyone else has a different or better idea. If nothing happens I'll accept your answer since I feel it is less convoluted than my own solution. – AlefSin Jun 5 '14 at 9:43

Assuming you can batch by amount (1000) instead of time (1 second), the simplest solution is probably using TPL Dataflow's BatchBlock which automatically batches a flow of items by size:

async Task TestLogger(Device device, int seconds)
{
    var writer = new StreamWriter("test.log");
    var batch = new BatchBlock<byte[]>(1000);
    var logAction = new ActionBlock<byte[]>(
        packet =>
        {
            return writer.WriteLineAsync(ToHexString(packet));
        });
    ActionBlock<byte[]> transferAction;
    transferAction = new ActionBlock<byte[][]>(
        bytes =>
        {
            foreach (var packet in bytes)
            {
                if (transferAction.InputCount > 0)
                {
                    return; // or throw new Exception("Write Time Out!");
                }
                logAction.Post(packet);
            }
        }
    );

    batch.LinkTo(transferAction);
    logAction.Completion.ContinueWith(_ => writer.Dispose());

    while (true)
    {
        batch.Post(await device.ReadAsync());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if there's 1005 new packets already, but it's only been 995ms? Or only 995 packets, but 1005ms already elapsed? I think you should stick to either time or # of packets, but not both. – avo Jun 5 '14 at 11:58
    
@avo if there are 1005 new packets, 1000 of them will be written, If there are 995 they will not. the batching is based only on size. – i3arnon Jun 5 '14 at 12:02
    
My understanding is, @AlefSin want's to fail the write-out if the number of new pending packets is more than 1000. In which case, this approach doesn't work. That's how I see it, anyway. – avo Jun 5 '14 at 12:05
1  
@I3arnon I have never used TPL before. This is a very interesting solution. I need to study it a bit since obviously my production quality code has other consideration to take into account. Overall, I like this approach a lot. – AlefSin Jun 5 '14 at 12:41
1  
@AlefSin TPL == task parallel library. You have been using it whenever you were using a task. TPL dataflow on the other hand, is unfortunately a less known library. – i3arnon Jun 5 '14 at 12:51

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