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when the output reaches the bottom of the page, i'd like the canvas to automatically extend so that it can keep going. I tried setting the canvas.height property, but it clears the window. Is there any way to do this?

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The <canvas> element is defined to get cleared whenever resized, so you have to do it manually. – Gabe Mar 10 '10 at 7:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What I do:
create dummy canvas with same size as your canvas.

dummyCanvas.getContext('2d').drawImage(yourCanvas, 0, 0);
newCanvas = recreate(yourCanvas);
newCanvas.getContext('2d').drawImage(dummyCanvas);

Not very pretty, especially in your situation where it would require you recreating the canvas 50+ times per second... Interested in seeing other answers... It works for me because I just resize the canvas when the clientWidth/clientHeight changes [window.onresize]

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ok thanks - i guess canvas jsut isn't designed for what I want to do exactly – pat Mar 11 '10 at 20:19

I know this is sort of old now, however:

You don't need to recreate the canvas as ItzWarty explaines. You can do this:

<html>...
  <canvas id="canvas"></canvas>
  <canvas id="buffer" style="display:none;"></canvas>
  ...
</html> 

Then this would be your javascript:

var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
var buffer = document.getElementById('buffer');
window.onresize = function(event) {
    var w = $(window).width(); //Using jQuery for easy multi browser support.
    var h = $(window).height();
    buffer.width = w;
    buffer.height = h;
    buffer.getContext('2d').drawImage(canvas, 0, 0);
    canvas.width = w;
    canvas.height = h;
    canvas.getContext('2d').drawImage(buffer, 0, 0);
}

Here you only change the size of the canvases, and you copy over the image. I am not sure, but I believe the performance is a bit better, and it is in my opinion simpler and easier to understand.

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