Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I tried to create an example for cond and case and came up with a simple implementation of the fizz buzz problem (see Wikipedia for details).

My initial version is:

(defun is-fizz-buzz (n)
  (cond ((and (zerop (mod n 3)) (zerop (mod n 5))) 'fizz-buzz)
        ((zerop (mod n 3)) 'fizz)
        ((zerop (mod n 5)) 'buzz)
        (t n)))

(defun fizz-buzz (n)
  (princ (case (is-fizz-buzz n)
               ('fizz "Fizz!")
               ('buzz "Buzz!")
               ('fizz-buzz "Fizz-Buzz!")
               (otherwise n))))

Now, @RainerJoswig pointed out to me that my case is wrong. I was quite surprised, as it had worked as it should, but as he's way more experienced with Lisp than I am, he's most probably right (and in fact, he is).

I tried to read and understand http://clhs.lisp.se/Body/m_case_.htm, but now I'm left with more questions than answers. As I didn't want to discuss things in 140 characters and as it may be helpful for other Lisp beginners, I thought to publish my questions here.

Basically, the syntax of case is described as

case keyform {normal-clause}* [otherwise-clause] => result*

keyform is easy: It's a form that is evaluated to get the key that is being tested. For sure

(is-fizz-buzz n)

is a form and it returns a symbol, hence everything looks fine. Additionally, as I learned from Land of Lisp, case internally works with eq, and as eq is used to compare symbols, this should be fine as well.

Now, the normal-clause: This is defined as

(keys form*)

form* again is simple, it's just a number of forms, basically with an implicit progn. For keys, it tells me that this is a designator for a list of objects. Phew. Here my questions begin…

This document tells me that a designator is:

an object that denotes another object.

Hm. As case is working with eq, I would have expected that I need to give a symbol here. And why is keys a designator for a list of objects, not for a single one? May I have multiple symbols that I can compare against in a single branch? I guess the problem here comes down to not really understanding what is meant by a designator, but maybe someone can help me and push me into the right direction. How would you explain what a designator is in Lisp?

Then, I started playing around with the code, and I noticed that if I remove the ' character, things still work. The code

(defun fizz-buzz (n)
  (princ (case (is-fizz-buzz n)
               (fizz "Fizz!")
               (buzz "Buzz!")
               (fizz-buzz "Fizz-Buzz!")
               (otherwise n))))

produces the very same result as the code above. Why is this? I would not even have expected this to be executable at all, as (fizz "Fizz!") to me looks like a function call of fizz, which doesn't exist. Why does this work?

And then, the final question is, when I run

(case 'quote ('foo 1) ('bar 2))

it returns 1 (which does not seem to be logical, I would have expected nil). If I change this to

(case 'quote ('foo 1) ('bar 2) (otherwise 3))

it still returns 1, not 3 as I now would have expected. From the documentation I don't get why my otherwise-clause obviously does not what it should do.

Any hints why these two cases behave like they do?

share|improve this question
    
whose element is that non-nil atom) or a proper list (denoting itself)." Thus the symbol fizz and the list (fizz) both designate the list (fizz), the list (quote fizz) designates itself, etc. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 5 '14 at 18:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

CASE use EQL not EQ. EQL is in most cases the default comparison. Thus case works for identity, numbers and characters.

The keyforms are NOT evaluated. Thus it makes no sense to quote objects. Quoting means stopping evaluation. But there is no evaluation -> no quote.

The keyform is either a single item, or a list of items

(case foo
  (bar 'it-is-bar)
  ((1 2) 'one-or-two)
  (1     'one))
  ((apple banana orange) 'either-apple-banana-or-orange)))

It also means that one the left side are constants, no variables. bar above is the symbol bar, not the variable bar.

Problem:

 (case 'quote
   ('foo 'foo-or-quote))

because it really is

 (case 'quote
   ((quote foo) 'foo-or-quote))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for explaining this, it now makes a lot more sense :-)). By the way, Land of Lisp on page 58 claims that case uses eq (which doesn't mean that this must be right ;-)). –  Golo Roden Jun 5 '14 at 14:06
    
PS: But you're right, as macroexpand shows. –  Golo Roden Jun 5 '14 at 14:10
1  
@Yes: The ANSI Standard mentions in one place that EQL is the default comparison. Unfortunately this is not easily visible from the pages describing MEMBER, POSITION, CASE, ... 'Land of Lisp' is just wrong here. Maybe it is already mentioned in the Errata page for the book? –  Rainer Joswig Jun 5 '14 at 14:50

Okay, I was able to figure out some of the problems by myself, primarily by reading this question and the according answers. This explains to me why my otherwise-clause didn't work, and it also explains why

(case 'quote ('foo 1) ('bar 2))

is being evaluated the way it is. So I guess that my fizz-buzz function at least should be:

(defun fizz-buzz (n)
  (princ (case (is-fizz-buzz n)
               (fizz "Fizz!")
               (buzz "Buzz!")
               (fizz-buzz "Fizz-Buzz!")
               (otherwise n))))

UPDATE

Okay, now after having re-read the aforementioned question and answers multiple times, I think I finally got what is meant by a list of objects, and hence my code should be:

(defun fizz-buzz (n)
  (princ (case (is-fizz-buzz n)
               ((fizz) "Fizz!")
               ((buzz) "Buzz!")
               ((fizz-buzz) "Fizz-Buzz!")
               (otherwise n))))
share|improve this answer
1  
That looks fine, but you don't have to put those in lists, because the keys part of case is "a designator for a list of objects", and a list designator is "an object that denotes a list and that is one of: a non-nil atom (denoting a singleton list whose element is that non-nil atom) or a proper list (denoting itself)." Thus the symbol fizz and the list (fizz) both designate the list (fizz). –  Joshua Taylor Jun 5 '14 at 17:50
    
Thanks for pointing this out :-). I decided to do it this way to be consistent in style, no matter whether I have lists consisting of a single or of multiple items. Additionally, this helps differentiate otherwise from (otherwise). But nevertheless, good to know :-) –  Golo Roden Jun 5 '14 at 18:26
1  
Actually, I just expanded on it in an answer, too. Glad to hear that it helped. :) –  Joshua Taylor Jun 5 '14 at 18:32

For keys, it tells me that this is a designator for a list of objects. Phew. Here my questions begin…

This document tells me that a designator is:

an object that denotes another object.

Hm. As case is working with eq, I would have expected that I need to give a symbol here. And why is keys a designator for a list of objects, not for a single one? May I have multiple symbols that I can compare against in a single branch? I guess the problem here comes down to not really understanding what is meant by a designator, but maybe someone can help me and push me into the right direction. How would you explain what a designator is in Lisp?

I originally posted this as a comment, but I think this might stand as a sufficient answer, if it's the core problem in the question, so I'm adding it as an answer.

The text you need is in the HyperSpec. 1.4.1.5 Designators notes

The specific nature of the object denoted by a "<> designator" or a "designator for a <>" can be found in the Glossary entry for "<> designator."

The glossary entry for list designator is what you need:

list designator n. a designator for a list of objects; that is, an object that denotes a list and that is one of: a non-nil atom (denoting a singleton list whose element is that non-nil atom) or a proper list (denoting itself).

Thus the symbol fizz (a non-nil atom) and the list (fizz) both designate the list (fizz), the list (quote fizz) (often abbreviated as 'fizz) designates itself, etc.

Once you've learned about list designators,they're a very handy concept to use in you own code. Just document that you accept a list designator, and then convert with (if (listp x) x (list x)), and you're in business. It's very helpful, and you'll find more uses for it than you expect. E.g., I used it just the other day in an answer to How to group any consecutive numbers or items of a given series.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.