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the second function gives error C2803 http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zy7kx46x%28VS.80%29.aspx : 'operator ,' must have at least one formal parameter of class type. any clue?

template<class T,class A = std::allocator<T>> 
class Sequence : public std::vector<T,A> {
 public:
    Sequence<T,A>& operator,(const T& a) {
        this->push_back(a);
        return *this;
    }
    Sequence<T,A>& operator,(const Sequence<T,A>& a) {
        for(Sequence<T,A>::size_type i=0 ; i<a.size() ; i++) {
            this->push_back(a.at(i));
        }
        return *this;
    }
};

//this works!
template<typename T> 
Sequence<T> operator,(const T& a, const T&b) {
    Sequence<T> seq;
    seq.push_back(a);
    seq.push_back(b);
    return seq;
}

//this gives error C2803!
Sequence<double> operator,(const double& a, const double& b) {
    Sequence<double> seq;
    seq.push_back(a);
    seq.push_back(b);
    return seq;
}
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3  
You can't overload operators for the built-in types. And your repeated attempts to overload op, are misguided - it's not a magic bullet. –  anon Mar 9 '10 at 1:57
1  
@Neil, your comments are awsome. I like them xD –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 9 '10 at 2:56
    
It's a magic bullet which always shoots you in the foot! –  Potatoswatter Mar 9 '10 at 3:23
    
@neil: what happen if I overload operator using template, so the argument could be built-in types as the first function above? its compile and work, does it dangerous? –  uray Mar 9 '10 at 9:50
    
@uray: what happens is, (1.0,0.0) uses the built-in operator, for doubles, not the template you've defined. On my machine following a corrected version of your code, typeid((1.0,0.0)).name() is "d". –  Steve Jessop Mar 9 '10 at 10:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change that to:

Sequence<double> operator,(const Sequence<double>& a, const double& b)
{
    Sequence<double> seq(a);
    seq.push_back(b);
    return seq;
}

or (based on this article):

Sequence<double> operator,(Sequence<double> seq, const double& b)
{
    seq.push_back(b);
    return seq;
}
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In C++ you can't overload operator if at least one of the parameters of it is not a custom made class or something not primitive like enum. You can't overload + for int types and similarly you can't overload , for double types.

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The compile error is misguiding. An operator function can go well with both parameters being enumerations. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 9 '10 at 2:58

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