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Playing with built-in JavaScript objects and constructors, I noticed something a little odd.

Sometimes, it's possible to get new objects by calling a constructor without new. For example:

> new Array(1,2,3,4)
[1, 2, 3, 4]
> Array(1,2,3,4)
[1, 2, 3, 4]

But sometimes this doesn't work:

> Date()
"Thu Jun 05 2014 00:28:10 GMT-0600 (CST)"
> new Date()
Date 2014-06-05T06:28:10.876Z

Is the behavior of non-new constructor built-in functions defined anywhere in the ECMAScript specification? Note that this behavior is actually useful; I can make a non-sparse copy of an array by calling Array.apply(arr), but I'd only feel comfortable doing that if it were cross-platform.

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marked as duplicate by James Donnelly, kapa Jun 5 at 16:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Another related question with a similar answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/1978049/… –  Pablo Jun 5 at 14:34
    
Note: Date() === new Date().toString() –  Paul Rad Jun 5 at 14:37
    
1  
The behaviour for Date is in the docs -> "Note that JavaScript Date objects can only be instantiated by calling JavaScript Date as a constructor: calling it as a regular function (i.e. without the new operator) will return a string rather than a Date object; unlike other JavaScript object types, JavaScript Date objects have no literal syntax." –  adeneo Jun 5 at 14:39
    
For Array it's different, it returns a new instance even when called without the new keyword, so it depends on the native method you're using. –  adeneo Jun 5 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The behaviour of a native method depends on the EcmaScript specification.

For Date the spec says :

When Date is called as a function rather than as a constructor, it returns a String representing the current time (UTC).

NOTE : The function call Date(…) is not equivalent to the object creation expression new Date(…) with the same arguments.

and for Array the spec says

When Array is called as a function rather than as a constructor, it creates and initialises a new Array object.

Thus the function call Array(…) is equivalent to the object creation expression new Array(…) with the same arguments.

So how it works with or without the new keyword is completely dependant on what method you're using, and what the spec says should happen when called without the new keyword.

For instance, the Math object is different again

The Math object does not have a [[Construct]] internal property; it is not possible to use the Math object as a constructor with the new operator.

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It would be nice if you could add the behavior of all the built-ins as functions vs. constructors (there are not so many). The reference to the spec is very nice. –  user3629476 Jun 5 at 14:51
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@user3629476 - Well, there's Date, Array, Object, String, Number, Boolean, Math, RegExp etc. there's quite a few, and the spec says it all, I'm not sure if copying the spec for every built-in would make the answer any better ? –  adeneo Jun 5 at 14:54
    
Not to mention at you'd have to update he answer for ES6, ES7, etc. –  Felix Kling Jun 5 at 15:48

Yes, ECMA-262 (I am using 5.1 Edition for reference) does define how should object constructors behave when called with or without the new keyword.

For Array:

15.4.1 The Array Constructor Called as a Function:

When Array is called as a function rather than as a constructor, it creates and initialises a new Array object. Thus the function call Array(…) is equivalent to the object creation expression new Array(…) with the same arguments.

15.4.2 The Array Constructor:

When Array is called as part of a new expression, it is a constructor: it initialises the newly created object.

For Date:

15.9.2 The Date Constructor Called as a Function:

When Date is called as a function rather than as a constructor, it returns a String representing the current time (UTC).
The function call Date(…) is not equivalent to the object creation expression new Date(…) with the same arguments.

15.9.3 The Date Constructor:

When Date is called as part of a new expression, it is a constructor: it initialises the newly created object.

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