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I think I'm using the Users API incorrectly:

class BaseHandler(webapp.RequestHandler):
   user = users.get_current_user()

   def header(self, title):
     if self.user:
        render('Views/link.html', self, {'text': 'Log out', 'href': users.create_logout_url('/')})
     else:
        render('Views/link.html', self, {'text': 'Log in', 'href': users.create_login_url('/')})

link.html:

<p>
    <a href="{{href}}">{{text}}</a>
</p>

Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. I will click the "log out" link 10 times in a row, and reload the page, and it will redirect me to the '/' page. Then, mysteriously, one of the times I'll be logged out. Logging in fails in essentially the same fashion. What's going on here?

Solved - This works:

class BaseHandler(webapp.RequestHandler):

    def __init__(self):
        self.user = users.get_current_user()

    def header(self, title):
        if self.user:
            render('Views/message.html', self, {'msg': "Welcome, %s" % self.user.nickname()})
            render('Views/link.html', self, {'text': 'Log out', 'href': users.create_logout_url('/')})
        else:
            render('Views/link.html', self, {'text': 'Log in', 'href': users.create_login_url('/')})

It looks like I can have instance variables by referring to them as self.var_name in a function, but never declaring them on a class level. Odd.

share|improve this question
    
Is this actually one GAE or the dev server? –  prestomation Mar 9 '10 at 3:30
    
This is running on the dev server on my machine. –  Rosarch Mar 9 '10 at 3:51
    
You need to use firebug or some other development console to see what's happening when you click 'log out'. It should redirect you to /_ah/..., which should send a Set-Cookie header to clear the cookie, then redirect you back to /. –  Nick Johnson Mar 9 '10 at 9:29
3  
user != self.user != users –  stefanw Mar 9 '10 at 11:13
    
@stefanw Even though one is declared at the class level, and another in a function? –  Rosarch Mar 9 '10 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are storing the result of users.get_current_user() in the variable called user, but then your if checks the value of self.user, which is not the same variable.

Use the same variable name and all should be fine!

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, it looks like I didn't include enough code initially. self.user is being checked from within a function, whereas user is stored at the class level. –  Rosarch Mar 9 '10 at 15:00

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