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Does setWidth(int pixels) use device independent pixel or physical pixel as unit? For example, does setWidth(100) set the a view's width to 100 dips or 100 pxs?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 147 down vote accepted

It uses pixels, but I'm sure you're wondering how to use dips instead. The answer is in TypedValue.applyDimension(). Here's an example of how to convert dips to px in code:

// Converts 14 dip into its equivalent px
Resources r = getResources();
float px = TypedValue.applyDimension(TypedValue.COMPLEX_UNIT_DIP, 14, r.getDisplayMetrics());
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52  
You can also call nbDips * getResources().getDisplayMetrics().density –  Romain Guy Mar 9 '10 at 5:08
7  
In fact, that's exactly what TypedValue.applyDimension() does. I considered posting that, but I like going through the API in case anything ever changes... though I guess it's safe to use that method if you give it the okay. :) –  Daniel Lew Mar 9 '10 at 5:15
9  
The applyDimension() version executes more code and it a bit more difficult to read I find. FWIW, the line I posted is what we actually use all over the place in the framework and standard apps. –  Romain Guy Mar 9 '10 at 5:25
1  
Hi, i tried the above two examples and it doesnt seem to calculate the pixels correctly. instead, it returns me the exact value i specify in my view: android:layout_width="50dip" in my case. it will return me 50 the exact value in the xml file. i then checked this in the app and as expected, the value is incorrect and draws the view too large then expected –  jonney Jan 17 '11 at 15:15
    
The only solution I found for px to pt conversion, very nice. –  A-Live Dec 13 '12 at 13:42

The correct way to obtain a constant number of DIPs in code is to create a resources XML file containing dp values a bit like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <dimen name="image_width">100dp</dimen>
    <dimen name="image_height">75dp</dimen>
</resources>

Then refer to the resource in your code like so:

float width = getResources().getDimension(R.dimen.image_width));
float height = getResources().getDimension(R.dimen.image_height));

The float you have returned will be scaled accordingly for the pixel density of the device and so you don't need to keep replicating a conversion method throughout your application.

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In my situation, this solution works best where I have an custom dialog which has a listview and a want to set the width of the Header Labels and columns in the ListView to the same width. –  Wayne Phipps Jun 7 '13 at 11:02
    
Your first sentence is kinda funny, you are basically saying that creating an XML file is the proper way to "specify [something] in code". Well I think you're merely using the constant in code not specifying it :) –  Joffrey Jun 19 '14 at 8:35
    
@Joffrey yes I see what you mean so I've updated the wording slightly –  SDJMcHattie Jul 10 '14 at 14:37
    
Great answer, for me it was helpful –  Manolescu Sebastian Oct 1 '14 at 8:13

Pixels of course, the method is asking for pixels as parameter.

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1  
If it is in layout xml file, we can specify android:layout_width="100dip" or android:layout_width="100px". In the source code, we can't specify the width of a layout as 100dip? –  user256239 Mar 9 '10 at 5:05
    
Not directly, you have to convert yourself using DisplayMetrics.density. –  Romain Guy Mar 9 '10 at 5:10

Method setWidth(100), set 100 px as width(not in dp).So you may face width varying problems on different android phones.So use measurement in dp instead of pixels.Use the below code to get measurement in dp of sample width=300px and height=400px.

int width = (int) TypedValue.applyDimension(TypedValue.COMPLEX_UNIT_DIP, 300, getResources().getDisplayMetrics());

int Height = (int) TypedValue.applyDimension(TypedValue.COMPLEX_UNIT_DIP, 400, getResources().getDisplayMetrics());
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