Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I run my program it asks for the password indefinitely. I enter the correct password but it simply loops back. There were no errors while I was compiling. To compile, I used:

gcc -ansi -W -Wall -pedantic -o prog myProgram.c
chmod +x prog

I am running ubuntu trusty. Here is the code related to the password:

char string[100] = "";

int main(void)
{
    char correctPassword[25] = "myPassword";
    char password[25] = "";

    system("clear");

    printf("Enter your password:\n");
    scanf("%s", password);

    if (password == correctPassword)
    {
        system("clear");
        printf("Enter a string:\n");
        scanf("%s", string);
    }
    else
    {
        system("clear");
        printf("Sorry, incorrect password\n");
        system("pause");
        main();
    }

updated code:

char string[100] = "";

int main(void)
{
    char correctPassword[25] = "myPassword";
    char password[25] = "";
    int ret;

    system("clear");

    printf("Enter your password:\n");
    scanf("%s", password);

    ret = strcmp(password, correctPassword);
    if (ret == 0)
    {
        system("clear");
        printf("Enter a string:\n");
        scanf("%s", string);
    }
    else
    {
        system("clear");
        printf("Sorry, incorrect password\n");
        system("pause");
        main();
    }
    return 0;
}

edit 2: i think this is beyond solved now, how do i mark it as such?

share|improve this question
2  
Step through it with a debugger to see what's happening. You have almost all of the tools you need to figure this one out yourself. Had you done this, you might've asked a question like "Why does password == correctPassword always return false?" which is a much better question. It's also quite strange to be calling main recursively the way you do. –  Pete Baughman Jun 5 at 18:27
    
You cannot compare arrays using ==. –  Joel Cornett Jun 5 at 18:28
1  
@mee: Use a while loop. Have you tried reading a book on C? That would be a great start. –  staticx Jun 5 at 18:29
1  
I think you decided to try the password program a bit too early. –  cppcoder Jun 5 at 18:33
2  
BTW... Don't call main() in your failed password attempt. That causes a lot of stuff to pushed onto the stack, and if the CORRECT password is entered, and program control gets passed off somewhere else, when the code exits, it has to unroll all that. The way you've authored the code above would call for the use of a label, and a GOTO. However, if you ask 10 different C programmers how to do this, you're likely to get 10 different answers. Everything from a for() loop, so you exit after x attempts, to a while loop, to a goto, to a do loop... You GOTTA love the C language! –  LarryF Jun 5 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This line

if (password == correctPassword)

does not do what you think it does. It isn't comparing the strings, it is comparing the memory address of the first character of each string. If you want to compare the strings, you want to use strcmp, which you can read about here: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/ansi_c/c_strcmp.htm

EDIT In response to the change in the code; you have the line

if(ret = 0)

You want

if(ret == 0)

I'm assuming this is a typo.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, i'll read that now. –  mee Jun 5 at 18:31
    
i updated my code to use strcmp(), but now I get 2 warnings. where should I paste my updated code for you to see? –  mee Jun 5 at 18:39
    
Go ahead and edit your question; I'll edit my answer accordingly –  wolfPack88 Jun 5 at 18:40
    
This is the 100% correct answer... If you get warnings, what are they? Remember, strcmp() under some CRT's has changed to strcmp_s(), which allows you to set an absolute MAX on the LENGTH of the strings preventing the possible case of say dumping in an entire FILE into your small Password field and overflowing the stack, resulting in an exploit in your program. –  LarryF Jun 5 at 18:43
    
HA! Thats right :) its a type. ok hold on ill update and check again. missed that one –  mee Jun 5 at 18:44

Add an ampersand in the scanf statement.

scanf("%s", &password);
share|improve this answer
    
password already decays to a pointer –  Pete Baughman Jun 5 at 18:36
    
password already is a char*, so adding the amperstand is actually wrong –  Vitor Jun 5 at 18:37
    
yeah, if i add an ampersand it give me an error –  mee Jun 5 at 18:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.