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Given the following route:

$routeProvider.when('/users/:userId-:userEncodedName', {
    ...
})

When hitting the URL /users/42-johndoe, the $routeParams are initialized as expected:

$routeParams.userId // is 42
$routeParams.userEncodedName // is johndoe

But when hitting the URL /users/42-john-doe, the $routeParam are initialized as follow:

$routeParams.userId // is 42-john
$routeParams.userEncodedName // is doe

Is there any way to make the named groups non-greedy, i.e. to obtain the following $routeParams:

$routeParams.userId // is 42
$routeParams.userEncodedName // is john-doe

?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can change the path

from

$routeProvider.when('/users/:userId-:userEncodedName', {});

to

$routeProvider.when('/users/:userId*-:userEncodedName', {})

As stated in the AngularJS Documentation regarding $routeProviders, path property:

path can contain named groups starting with a colon and ending with a star: e.g.:name*. All characters are eagerly stored in $routeParams under the given name when the route matches.

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1  
This indeed works, but from reading the docs I really expected it to do the exact opposite. Strange ! – ExpertSystem Jun 5 '14 at 19:33

Oddly enough Ryeballar's answer does indeed work (as is demonstrated in this short demo). I say "oddly enough", because based on the docs ("[...] characters are eagerly stored [...]"), I would expect it to work exactly the opposite way.


So, out of curiosity, I did some digging into the source code (v1.2.16) and it turns out that by a strange coincidence it indeed works. (Actually, this looks more like an inconsistency in the way route-paths are parsed).

The pathRegExp() function is responsible for converting the route path template into a regular expression, which is later used to match against the actual route paths.
The code that converts the route path template string into a RegExp pattern is the following:

path = path
    .replace(/([().])/g, '\\$1')
    .replace(/(\/)?:(\w+)([\?\*])?/g, function(_, slash, key, option){
        var optional = option === '?' ? option : null;
        var star = option === '*' ? option : null;
        ...
        slash = slash || '';
        return ''
            + (optional ? '' : slash)
            + '(?:'
            + (optional ? slash : '')
            + (star && '(.+?)' || '([^/]+)')
            + (optional || '')
            + ')'
            + (optional || '');
    })
    .replace(/([\/$\*])/g, '\\$1');

Based on the code above, the two route path templates (with and without *) end up in the following (totally different) regular expressions:

'/test/:param1-:param2'  ==> '\/test\/(?:([^\/]+))-(?:([^\/]+))'
'/test/:param1*-:param2' ==> '\/test\/(?:(.+?))-(?:([^\/]+))'

So, what does each RegExp mean ?


/test/(?:([^/]+))-(?:([^/]+))

Let's break this up:

  • \/test\/: Match the string '/test/'.
  • (?:([^\/]+)) is equivalent to ([^\/]+) with the difference that we tell the RegExp engine not to store the capturing group's backreference.
    ([^\/]+): Match any sequence of 1 or more characters that does not contain /. By default, the RegExp engine will try to match as many characters as possible, as long as the rest of the string can match the remaining pattern (-(?:([^\/]+))).
  • Since the minimum substring that matches -(?:([^\/]+)) is -doe, :param2 will be matched to doe and :param1 to 42-john.

/test/(?:(.+?))-(?:([^/]+))

Let's break this up:

  • \/test\/: Match the string '/test/'.
  • (?:(.+?)) is equivalent to (.+?) with the difference that we tell the RegExp engine not to store the capturing group's backreference.
    (.+?): Non-greedily match any sequence of 1 or more characters (any characters), as long as the rest of the string can match the remaining pattern (-(?:([^\/]+))). The key here is the ? following .+ which adds the non-greedy behaviour.
  • Since the minimum substring that matches (.+?) (and on the same time let the rest of the string match -(?:([^\/]+))) is 42, :param1 will be matched to 42 and :param2 to john-doe.

I hope this makes sense. Feel free to leave a comment if it doesn't :)

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