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I am confused by the following data.table behavior.

Set up reproducible example

iris <- data.table(iris)[1:10]
iris[,row.ord:=.I]

Why does this:

iris[,Val1:=Sepal.Length[row.ord]+Sepal.Length[row.ord+1]]

give a different result compared to this:

iris[,Val2:=sum(Sepal.Length[row.ord:(row.ord+1)])]
#Warning messages:
#1: In row.ord:(row.ord + 1) :
#  numerical expression has 10 elements: only the first used
#2: In row.ord:(row.ord + 1) :
#  numerical expression has 10 elements: only the first used

Results

    Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width Species row.ord Val Val1 Val2
 1:          5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2  setosa       1 5.1 10.0   10
 2:          4.9         3.0          1.4         0.2  setosa       2 4.9  9.6   10
 3:          4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2  setosa       3 5.1  9.3   10
 4:          4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2  setosa       4 4.9  9.6   10
 5:          5.0         3.6          1.4         0.2  setosa       5 5.1 10.4   10
 6:          5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4  setosa       6 4.9 10.0   10
 7:          4.6         3.4          1.4         0.3  setosa       7 5.1  9.6   10
 8:          5.0         3.4          1.5         0.2  setosa       8 4.9  9.4   10
 9:          4.4         2.9          1.4         0.2  setosa       9 5.1  9.3   10
10:          4.9         3.1          1.5         0.1  setosa      10 4.9   NA   10
share|improve this question
3  
sum is not vectorized so it will try to return a single value. And seq() (which is the underlying function for :) is always getting 1 and 2 as its arguments. .... as the warning tells you. – 42- Jun 5 '14 at 22:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As commented The main reason is that : sum, is not vectorized. One classical way to vectorize it is to use mapply:

iris[, Val2:=mapply(sum,Sepal.Length[row.ord],Sepal.Length[row.ord+1])]

Now Val1 and Val2 are equal:

  Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width Species row.ord Val1 Val2
 1:          5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2  setosa       1 10.0 10.0
 2:          4.9         3.0          1.4         0.2  setosa       2  9.6  9.6
 3:          4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2  setosa       3  9.3  9.3
 4:          4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2  setosa       4  9.6  9.6
 5:          5.0         3.6          1.4         0.2  setosa       5 10.4 10.4
 6:          5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4  setosa       6 10.0 10.0
 7:          4.6         3.4          1.4         0.3  setosa       7  9.6  9.6
 8:          5.0         3.4          1.5         0.2  setosa       8  9.4  9.4
 9:          4.4         2.9          1.4         0.2  setosa       9  9.3  9.3
10:          4.9         3.1          1.5         0.1  setosa      10   NA   NA

PS:This question may help you to better understand the "vectorized" aspect.

EDIT after OP comment:

looks like the OP is looking for a forward rolling sum.

library(zoo)
iris[,valr := rollapplyr(Sepal.Length,5,sum)]
share|improve this answer
    
But what if I want to sum more than just two values? (e.g. sum Sepal.Length[row.ord:(row.ord+5])]) – Mike.Gahan Jun 5 '14 at 22:31
1  
@Mike.Gahan you can see my edit. – agstudy Jun 5 '14 at 22:54
    
+1. This is helpful! But why does the this: iris[,Val2:="+"(Sepal.Length[row.ord:(row.ord+1)])] not work? "+" is vectorized. – Shambho Jun 6 '14 at 3:19
1  
Note that the zoo package has rollsumr too. – G. Grothendieck Jun 6 '14 at 4:25

It looks like you're using the sum to include the element count:

iris[,Val2:=sum(Sepal.Length[row.ord:(row.ord+1)])]

You need to extract the elements, not just get the count.

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