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I wrote two nearly identical pieces of code, the difference being that the first one uses arrays and the second one uses vectors.

Using arrays:

int merge_count(int toMerge[], int arrSize, int lo, int mid, int hi)
{
    int aux[arrSize];
    for (int k = 0; k < arrSize; k++)
        aux[k] = toMerge[k];

    int i = lo, j = mid+1;
    int numinversions = 0, inversionpointer = mid - lo + 1;
    for (int k = lo; k <= hi; k++)
    {
        if (i > mid) {toMerge[k] = aux[j]; j++;}
        else if (j > hi) {toMerge[k] = aux[i]; i++;}
        else if (aux[j] < aux[i]) {toMerge[k] = aux[j]; j++; numinversions += inversionpointer;}
        else {toMerge[k] = aux[i]; i++; inversionpointer--;}
    }

    return numinversions;
}


int sort_count(int toSort[], int arrSize, int lo, int hi)
{
    if (hi <= lo) return 0;
    int mid = (lo + hi)/2;
    int numInversions = 0;
    numInversions += sort_count(toSort, arrSize, lo, mid);
    numInversions += sort_count(toSort, arrSize,  mid+1, hi);
    numInversions += merge_count(toSort, arrSize, lo, mid, hi);
    return numInversions;
}

int sort_count(int toSort[], int numElem)
{
    int lo = 0, hi = numElem-1;
    return sort_count(toSort, numElem, lo, hi);
}


int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    int x[] = {3, 7, 10, 14, 18, 9, 2, 11, 16, 17, 23, 25};
    cout << sort_count(x, 12);
    return 0;
}

Using vectors:

int merge_count(vector <int> toMerge, int arrSize, int lo, int mid, int hi)
{
    int aux[arrSize];
    for (int k = 0; k < arrSize; k++)
        aux[k] = toMerge[k];

    int i = lo, j = mid+1;
    int numinversions = 0, inversionpointer = mid - lo + 1;
    for (int k = lo; k <= hi; k++)
    {
        if (i > mid) {toMerge[k] = aux[j]; j++;}
        else if (j > hi) {toMerge[k] = aux[i]; i++;}
        else if (aux[j] < aux[i]) {toMerge[k] = aux[j]; j++; numinversions += inversionpointer;}
        else {toMerge[k] = aux[i]; i++; inversionpointer--;}
    }

    return numinversions;
}


int sort_count(vector <int> toSort, int arrSize, int lo, int hi)
{
    if (hi <= lo) return 0;
    int mid = (lo + hi)/2;
    int numInversions = 0;
    numInversions += sort_count(toSort, arrSize, lo, mid);
    numInversions += sort_count(toSort, arrSize,  mid+1, hi);
    numInversions += merge_count(toSort, arrSize, lo, mid, hi);
    return numInversions;
}

int sort_count(vector <int> toSort, int numElem)
{
    int lo = 0, hi = numElem-1;
    return sort_count(toSort, numElem, lo, hi);
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{   
    vector <int> x = {3, 7, 10, 14, 18, 9, 2, 11, 16, 17, 23, 25};
    cout << sort_count(x, 12);
    return 0;
}

The two codes are exactly identical, except all I did was change each type of int arr[] to vector <int> arr within the merging and sorting functions. However, these two codes produce different results, the first using arrays outputs 13 while the second with vectors outputs 15.

13 is the intended result, but using vectors does not give that result. Why does this strange behavior occur?

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int aux[arrSize] is not illegal in C++. –  cbel Jun 6 '14 at 6:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are passing the vector by value. Hence the changes you do in your merge_count function is not reflected in the original vector.

Since arrays are decayed to pointers when passed to a function, the changes you make to the address locations are actually done in the original array as well.

Try passing the vector by reference.

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Array:

int tab[] = { 0, 1, 2 };    
func(int p[]) { p[0] = 1; }

func(tab); // will change value of first element
// after that tab[0] == 1

Vector:

std::vector<int> vec { 0, 1, 2 };    
func(std::vector<int> v) { v[0] = 1; }

func(vec); 
// after that vec[0] == 0, not 1!

Basically when you pass array, you pass pointer to it. Vector is copied... You can pass reference to vector to solve your problem

func(std::vector<int> &v) { }
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