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I have an old device with a minimal custom linux Kernel. We bought the device from a company around 20 years ago and programmed it to suit our needs.

uname -r
2.4.21

I have developed a text based UI on the device and am allowing access to it through telnet and serial port.

When connected using telnet, calling read -s STR twice, leads to the second read being ignored. This occurs because telnet ends lines with "\r\n".

e.g.:

echo "Enter new password: "; read -s password1
echo "Enter new password again: "; read -s password2 #<--this read returns directly

so my solution was to read all characters from stdin after each read call. However, using serial communication only "\n" is sent as a line ending. So I decided to add 1 second timeout to the above read call.

So, I basically ended up with this:

echo "Enter new password: "; read -s password1
read -t 1 -n 1000 ignore
echo "Enter new password again: "; read -s password2
read -t 1 -n 1000 ignore

And to my surprise, read -t 1 blocks sometimes. So I ran the following to illustrate this behavior:

set -x

while true;
do
read -t 1 -n 10000 STR
echo "timeout"
sleep 5
done

The script hangs after 2 loops and only continues when I press enter.

Last I tried the following:

set -x
unset STR
while true;
do
read -s -n 1 char
if [[ $char == $'\r' ]]
then
read -s -n 1 ignore
break
elif [[ $char == $'\n' ]]
then
break
fi
STR=$STR$char
done

This leads to:

++ true
++ read -s -n 1 char
 ]][[ a == \
++ [[ a == \
 ]]
++ STR=a
++ true
++ read -s -n 1 char   <-------- HERE I PRESSED ENTER
 ]][[ '' == \
++ [[ '' == \
 ]]
++ STR=a
++ true
++ read -s -n 1 char

So ENTER or "\n" is being translated to '', therefore it does not break out of the loop.

On newer devices, where we have more control over the kernel

uname -r
2.6.24.6

The issue does not occur, i.e. calling read twice does not lead to the second read call being ignored.

Does anyone have an idea of a work around this issue?

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1  
A couple of things about this sound wrong. First, since the pair is \r\n, the first read should include the \r at the end of the string stored in the parameter, rather than requiring a second read to clear it. Second, while the telnet protocol may use \r\n, those should not be passed on to the underlying shell which receives its input via telnet. –  chepner Jun 6 at 12:43
    
@chepner it is weird indeed. It seems to me that \r is included in the internal field separator (IFS). However, due to the lack of support of basic system commands in the kernels I am unable to print the IFS. I tried export IFS=' \t\n', but to no avail. BTW, is there another way to test for \r or \n other than [[ $char == $'\r' ]] || [[ $char == $'\n' ]]? or maybe even print the characters received in hex? –  hhachem Jun 6 at 22:56
1  
I don't think kernel version is important at all. Can you tell us the shell you're using and it's version? –  mkalkov Jul 14 at 16:05
    
@mkalkov GNU bash, version 2.05.8(1)-release (i386-redhat-linux-gnu) –  hhachem Jul 15 at 5:55

1 Answer 1

The terminal is translating every '\r' into '\n', so you see no difference between the two. You can use stty igncr to ignore completely the CR. With that, your first approach should work:

stty igncr
echo "Enter new password: "; read -s password1
echo "Enter new password again: "; read -s password2
stty sane

The last stty sane may not be necessary.

If that approach does not work, try using stty -icrnl instead (but that way, $password1 and $password2 will have a \r at the end; you can suppress it with tr -d '\r').

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