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I read Cwalina book (recommendations on development and design of .NET apps).

He says that good designed struct has to be less than 16 bytes in size (for performance purpose).

My questions is - why exactly is this?

And (more important) can I have larger struct with same efficiency if I run my .NET 3.5 (soon to be .NET 4.0) 64-bit application on i7 under Win7 x64 (is this limitation CPU / OS based)?

Just to stress again - I need as efficient struct as it is possible. I try to keep it in stack all the time, the application is heavily multi-threaded and runs on sub-millisecond intervals, the current size of the struct is 64 byte.

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2  
What makes you believe that keeping your data on the stack is more efficient? Stack vs. heap is an implementation detail in .NET and developers shouldn't care (see stackoverflow.com/questions/477101/…) –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Mar 9 '10 at 9:39
    
Asking about efficiency without saying which metrics you're using is a tad vague. It's like asking for the most efficient vehicle - without mentioning whether you're wanting to save money on your commute, or trying to transport 30 tonnes of cargo. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 9 '10 at 9:47
1  
Divo you are wrong in principle. What should I care about to make my application better is outside of this topic. Thanks –  please delete me Mar 9 '10 at 11:40
    
@maxima120: My point was not to criticize you personally, but what is more important in .NET than stack vs. heap is value type semantics vs. reference type semantics. And having your variables on the stack doesn't mean "more efficient". Having a value type, however, could mean a negative impact as they are copied when passed along. Of course, my above comment is not an answer to your main question, but still a relevant aspect (That's why I didn't post it as answer). There are IMHO very few reasons to use structs in C# (e.g. P/Invoke, or when dealing with "values" such as DateTime). –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Mar 9 '10 at 12:32
    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/1082311/… –  MB. Oct 12 '11 at 19:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Only you know how your structs are being used in your program. But if nothing else, you can always test it for yourself. For instance, if it's frequently passed to other functions, the following may illuminate you:

class MainClass
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Struct64 s1 = new Struct64();
        Class64 c1 = new Class64();
        DoStuff(s1);
        DoStuff(c1);
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
        {
            s1 = DoStuff(s1);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Struct {0}", sw.ElapsedTicks);
        sw.Reset();

        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
        {
            c1 = DoStuff(c1);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Class {0}", sw.ElapsedTicks);
        sw.Reset();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

with:

public class Class64
{
    public long l1;
    public long l2;
    public long l3;
    public long l4;
    public long l5;
    public long l6;
    public long l7;
    public long l8;
}
public struct Struct64
{
    public long l1;
    public long l2;
    public long l3;
    public long l4;
    public long l5;
    public long l6;
    public long l7;
    public long l8;
}

Try this sort of thing with representative structs/classes, and see what results you get. (On my machine, above test, the class seems ~3 times faster)

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1  
Same here.. For 16 bytes I had 24/18 (struct vs class), for 32 bytes 30/17 vor 64 bytes 42/18. It seems 16 bytes indeed is a reasonable threshold regardless CPU / bus width. –  please delete me Mar 9 '10 at 11:30
1  
Replace the benchmark with a loop that for a struct does for (int i=0; i<100000; i++) {mystruct.l1 += i;}, and then try it for a struct and class with for (int i=0; i<100000; i++) {mything = new Whatever(mything.l1+i, mything.l2, mything.l3, mything.l4, mything.l5, mything.l6, mything.l7, mything.l8)}; The simple mutable struct will win by a mile, with an execution time that's independent of the number of fields. The "immutable-struct-style" version is apt to outperform the class version by a considerable margin, however; adding dozens of long fields would not change that. –  supercat Mar 14 '13 at 19:40

You're misquoting the book (at least the 2nd edition). Jeffrey Richter states value types can be more than 16 bytes if:

You don't intend to pass them to other methods or copy them to and from a collection class.

Additionally Eric Gunnerson adds (regarding the 16 byte limit)

Use this guideline as a trigger to do more investigation.

It is simply not true that a struct "has to be less than 16 bytes in size". It all depends on usage.

If you are creating the struct and also consuming it and are worried about performance then use a profiler comparing a struct vs class to see which works best for you.

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1  
I said - it has to be to be considered a good design. Please quote the whole sentence. Cos from how you distored my words is - struct has to be 16 bytes or less... No it has not! I read this book just yesterday. I know what Richter said and this is not applicable to my application hence I simply ignored this... Because the topic is NOT to discuss the book but help me make MY application more efficient Thank you very much! And as for Gunnerson - that is EXACTLY what I am trying to do here - investigate further! –  please delete me Mar 9 '10 at 11:13
    
@Maxima120. I didn't distort your words. You misquoted the book, I corrected you. The book does state to avoid structs that don't have an instance size under 16 bytes (then adds caveats). That is clearly not the same as a "good designed struct has to be less than 16 bytes in size". –  RichardOD Mar 9 '10 at 12:20
  • Larger struct is not as efficient, but then.... if you HAVE more data, you have it. No sense talking about efficiency there.

  • 64 bytes shuold be ok.

  • The main reason possibly is copy operations.... which get IIRC slower if the struct is larger. And it must be copied around quite a lot.

I would normally advice into using a class here ;) But without knowing the content of the struct, it is a little tricky.

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Tom thanks mate. Could you please provide some information which outlines why 64 bytes is OK for my CPU ? BTW - the struct was natural choice for avoiding locks. The cost of development will go much higher if I used immutable class or locks instead... So lets pass on class vs struct.. –  please delete me Mar 9 '10 at 11:19
    
Well, there is no reference. I jus tthink 64 bytes may not be too much. It REALLY depends on the data that is in there. I NORMALLY dont use structs like that. I have a financial trading app (tons of data going through - little, around 64 bytes, somtiems 50.000+ items per second coming in) and I use classes. –  TomTom Mar 9 '10 at 11:27
    
I might be wrong about struct vs class... It could be worth to look into it. –  please delete me Mar 9 '10 at 11:27

I think another key point is that if you have a list with a million structs, that is still only one memory allocation on the heap, while a list with a million classes in it is going to have about a million separate heap objects. The garbage collection load is something quite different in both cases. From this point of view, the struct may come out ahead.

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if you store you're structs in a heap allocated object you better have them heap allocated as well! otherwise things get really funny when your current stackframe dies (together with the stack allocated objects) and you try to access them through the heap allocated object. That's one reason why all members (including value typed) are stored on the heap –  Rune FS Mar 9 '10 at 10:38
    
@Rune FS - true, but the whole vector of structs is going to be in one large, contiguous block of memory. As opposed to a million small pieces with individual lifetimes. –  Tarydon Mar 9 '10 at 11:31

One of the things i learnt while assembly language programming is that you align your structs (and other data) on 8 or 16 byte boundaries (there is actually a preprocessor command for it in MASM). The reason for this is considerably faster memory access when storing or moving things around in memory. Keeping your structs under 16 bytes in size would ensure that this memory alignment could be done successfully because nothing would cross the alignment boundaries.

However i would expect this sort of thing to be largely hidden from you when using the .Net framework. If your structs were bigger than 16 bytes them i would expect the framework (or JIT compiler) to align your data on 32 byte boundaries, and so on. It would be interesting to see some validation of the comments in those books, and see what the difference in speed is.

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the layout of structs is not a secret. Look up for LayoutStruct C# attribute.. E.g. vsj.co.uk/articles/display.asp?id=501 –  please delete me Mar 9 '10 at 11:33
    
That is a good link. I was more talking about the behaviour of the framework/JITter, and wondering why 16 was such a magic number (and whether it is still so magic or whether it has either been increased or made irrelevant). –  slugster Mar 9 '10 at 11:44

The JIT compiler produces special-case code to copy structures which are smaller than a certain thresholds, and a somewhat-slower general-purpose construct for larger ones. I would conjecture that when that advice was written, the threshold was 16 bytes, but in today's 32-bit framework it seems to be 24 bytes; it may be larger for 64-bit code.

That having been said, the cost of creating any size class object is substantially greater than the cost of copying a struct which holds the same data. If code creates a class object with 32 bytes worth of fields and then passes or otherwise copies a reference to that object 1,000 times, the time savings from copying 1,000 object references instead of having to copy 1,000 32-byte structures would likely outweigh the cost of creating the class object. If, however, the object instance would be abandoned after the reference has been copied only twice, the cost of creating the object would probably exceed by a large margin the cost of copying a 32-byte structure twice.

Note also that it's possible in many cases to avoid passing around structures by value or otherwise redundantly copying them, if one endeavors to do so. Passing any size of structure as a ref parameter to a method, for example, only requires passing a single-machine-word (4 or 8 bytes) address. Because .net lacks any sort of const ref concept, only writable fields or variables may be passed that way, and the collections built into .net--other than System.Array--provide no means to access members by ref. If one is willing to use arrays or custom collections, however, even huge (100 bytes or more) structures can be processed very efficiently. In many cases, the performance advantage of using a structure rather than an immutable class may grow with the size of the encapsulated data.

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