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Now that the C# 6 is finally going to have this long-anticipated ?. operator, is there similar thing in F#? And I'm not talking about ? operator.

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You could register a proposal at fslang.uservoice.com/forums/245727-f-language - As mentioned in my comments below, I'd be downvoting it rather than upvoting it if I could though :) –  Ruben Bartelink Jun 6 '14 at 8:57
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I support @MarkSeemann's answer 100%; he's said 1) the answer is No (yes he hasnt said it explicitly) 2) here's why 3) this is what you do instead. I call that an Acceptable Answer all day long. But there is slight room for debate about programming language design (though despite using F# for a significant amount of time I wouldn't necessarily feel qualified to call something a plain ommission - the what to leave out aspect is a key component of language design and one of the reasons to choose a language). If that is to occur, the uservoice is a far better forum than here. –  Ruben Bartelink Jun 6 '14 at 9:03
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It's a bit like asking Why do I have to type mutable all the time ? When is F# going to support auto-mutable like C# has for ages - I have lots of code that would be shorter with it... –  Ruben Bartelink Jun 6 '14 at 9:07
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@Ruben cool! After few minutes I already like Aether. Make it the answer, and I'll accept it. –  Endrju Aug 31 '14 at 9:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In functional languages, conditional / compositional traversal, especial in nested structures is generally modelled using the notion of lenses which is explained with a succinct example in this SO thread.

In the F# environment, there's Aether; see intro article and guide, which builds on the Lenses support developed and written about by Mauricio Scheffer in FSharpx here.

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Idiomatic F# doesn't have null values at all, so what use would it be? In F#, the most common way to model the absence of a value is to use option.

When I need to interoperate with .NET code that may return null, I convert it to an option as soon as possible, using a function like this:

let toOption (x : obj) =
    match x with
    | null -> None
    | _ -> Some x

As soon as you have your value modelled as an option, you can compose it with e.g. Option.map, and that serves the same purpose (but better, and safer) than the proposed C# operator.

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+1 I'd call that Option.ofObj :) –  Ruben Bartelink Jun 6 '14 at 8:39
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Then you have have a horribly designed system that you should hide behind an Anti-Corruption Layer (see DDD). –  Mark Seemann Jun 6 '14 at 8:42
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@Endrju And if any of these fields is null, you want to just do nothing, like ?. does? How often is that really what you want? Most of the time you'll want to process the case where SomeObject is null, the case where SomeComponent is null and the case SomeSubComponent is null differently, which is easy to do with pattern matching on None but forces you to go back to bug-prone if (a.b.c == null)s in C#. ?. is just not flexible enough to warrant a dedicated language construct IMO. –  Tarmil Jun 6 '14 at 8:48
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@Endrju The sort of sprinking of 'just in case' code and the thinking it engenders leads to extremely messy and hard to maintain code in my experience. You're not listening to Mark's core point: Nulls are not part of the F# way and you should be using some form of ACL which takes nulls, just in case check sprinkling, and NullReferenceExceptions out of the equation before you write your real code –  Ruben Bartelink Jun 6 '14 at 9:01
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@Endrju In case it wasn't already obvious from my answer, the short answer to your question is: no, F# doesn't have such an operator. As other people have pointed out, you can propose such a feature, or perhaps even contribute it, but I doubt it'd be accepted... At least, I don't think it fits into Functional thinking. That C# 6 is now getting this feature doesn't change that. In fact, I opposed this particular C# feature when it was first presented for MVP review, because it leads to harder-to-maintain code, but I was rather alone in my criticism... –  Mark Seemann Jun 6 '14 at 10:39

You can lift your nullable into option first. And then you can use an option computation expression to achieve the same thing.

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