Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a list of lists, something like this:

[
    [ 1, 2, 3 ],
    [ 20, 30, 40, 50 ],
    [ 11, 15, 17 ],
    [ 20, 22, 25, 27 ],
    [ 1, 5, 10 ],
    [ 1, 100 ]
]

I want to merge the inner lists where any element from one list matches any element in another. This also needs to be able to handle multiple overlaps (so in the above example 3 of the lists would be merged into one). So in this case the result would be as follows:

[
    [ 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 100 ],     # 3 lists have been merged into one
    [ 11, 15, 17 ],              # Untouched due to no overlap
    [ 20, 22, 25, 30, 40, 50 ],  # 2 lists merged
]

Is there an obvious algorithm or Perl module to use?

share|improve this question
3  
I don't understand why you decided that [1,2,3,5,10,100] shouldn't be merged with [10,15,17]. They both contain a 10, which seems to be exactly the rule that says they should be merged. Also the 27 disappeared. – Wumpus Q. Wumbley Jun 6 '14 at 10:42
1  
It's because I'm an idiot - I'll edit to remove that overlap - sorry! – ChrisH Jun 6 '14 at 11:10
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following is a single pass solution that does a little magic using array references.

For this algorithm by jaredor and other solutions, check out perlmonks: how to find combine common elements of an array?

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::MoreUtils qw(uniq);

my @data = map {[split]} <DATA>;

my %group = ();
for my $array (@data) {
    my @values = map {@$_} uniq map {$group{$_} || [$_]} @$array;
    @group{@values} = (\@values) x @values;
}
@data = uniq values %group;

# Resort to make things pretty
@$_ = sort {$a <=> $b} @$_ for @data;

use Data::Dump;
dd @data;

__DATA__
1 2 3
20 30 40 50
11 15 17
20 22 25 27
1 5 10
1 100

Outputs:

(
  [20, 22, 25, 27, 30, 40, 50],
  [11, 15, 17],
  [1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 100],
)
share|improve this answer
    
@mpapec You might like this solution – Miller Jun 6 '14 at 18:15
    
Im sure he would but for now a +1 from me coz I like it too! – jaypal singh Jun 6 '14 at 20:43
    
yes, clever solution. – Сухой27 Jun 7 '14 at 8:15
    
Clever - now if you can generalize it to do close matching... (eg. 5 matches 4-6) ;) – ChrisH Jun 9 '14 at 12:33

I used hashes to find the solution. If your lists might contain repeated members, this solution reduces their numbers to 1.

%shared represents what number is shared by what lists. Then, while there is a shared number, you merge the lists (i.e. you change the information in %shared). Once there is no shared number, you create the lists back from the hash.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

use Data::Dumper;

my @lists = (
             [ 1, 5, 10 ],
             [ 10, 15, 17 ],
             [ 20, 22, 25, 27 ],
             [ 20, 30, 40, 50 ],
             [ 1, 2, 3 ],
             [ 1, 100 ],
            );

my %shared;
for my $i (0 .. $#lists) {
    undef $shared{$_}{$i} for @{ $lists[$i] };
}

while (my ($num) = grep 1 < keys %{ $shared{$_} }, keys %shared) {
    my @to_merge = keys %{ $shared{$num} };
    my $list = shift @to_merge;
    for my $merge (@to_merge) {
        print "Merging list $merge to $list\n";
        for my $h (values %shared) {
            if (exists $h->{$merge}) {
                delete $h->{$merge};
                undef $h->{$list};
            }
        }
    }
}

my %left;
undef $left{ (keys %{ $shared{$_} })[0] }{$_} for keys %shared;
my @result = map [ keys %$_ ], values %left;

print Dumper \@result;
share|improve this answer

Only order of sub-arrays differs,

use strict;
use warnings;

sub merge {
  my ($arr) = @_;

  my $i = 0;
  while ($i < $#$arr) {
    my $current = $arr->[$i];
    my %h;
    @h{@$current} = ();
    my @ovlap = grep { 
      grep exists $h{$_}, @{$arr->[$_]} 

    } ($i+1) .. $#$arr;

    my %seen;
    @$current = 
      sort {$a <=> $b}
      grep !$seen{$_}++,
      (@$current, map @$_, @$arr[@ovlap]);

    @$arr[@ovlap] = ();
    @$arr = grep defined, @$arr;

    $i++;
  }
  return $arr;
}

my $arr = [
    [ 1, 2, 3 ],
    [ 20, 30, 40, 50 ],
    [ 11, 15, 17 ],
    [ 20, 22, 25, 27 ],
    [ 1, 5, 10 ],
    [ 1, 100 ],
];
merge(merge($arr));
use Data::Dumper; print Dumper $arr;

output

$VAR1 = [
      [
        1,
        2,
        3,
        5,
        10,
        100
      ],
      [
        20,
        22,
        25,
        27,
        30,
        40,
        50
      ],
      [
        11,
        15,
        17
      ]
    ];
share|improve this answer
    
you can't just make one pass; e.g. fails to merge all into one on [1],[2,3],[1,3] – ysth Jun 6 '14 at 11:02
    
@ysth how about merge(merge($arr));? – Сухой27 Jun 6 '14 at 11:17
    
I think you need do { $count = @$arr; merge($arr) } until $count == @$arr; – ysth Jun 6 '14 at 11:22

My twopence worth. Using simple looping and a cache to store position of each element in results list to save searching each time.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;
use Data::Dumper;

my $lol = [
    [ 1, 2, 3 ],
    [ 20, 30, 40, 50 ],
    [ 11, 15, 17 ],
    [ 20, 22, 25, 27 ],
    [ 1, 5, 10 ],
    [ 1, 100 ]
    ];

my @results = ();
my %resultCache;

sub elementInResults {
    my ($element) = $_[0];

    # return value for cache, or search if not in cache
    if (!defined $resultCache{$element} ) {
        # search for target in destination arrays
        for (my $destIndex = 0; $destIndex < @results;  $destIndex++) {
            if (grep (/$element/, @{$results[$destIndex]}) > 0 ) {
                $resultCache{$element} = $destIndex;
                last;
            }
        }
    }

    return $resultCache{$element};
}

my $srcCount=0;
# loop through  source arrays
for my $srcList (@$lol) {
    my $destIndex ;
    # loop through elements of array
    for (my $srcElementIndex=0; $srcElementIndex < @$srcList; $srcElementIndex++) {
        $destIndex = elementInResults($srcList->[$srcElementIndex]);
        if (defined $destIndex ) {
            # element exists in an existing result array so merge
            print "Merging source array $srcCount into result array $destIndex, match on:" . $srcList->[$srcElementIndex] . "\n";
            # remove the duplicate element from src list first
            splice(@$srcList,$srcElementIndex,1);
            # then merge into dest list
            push (@{$results[$destIndex]}, @$srcList);
            last;
        }
        $srcElementIndex++;
    }

    # if no elements in list found in existing results add list as new one to results
    push (@results, $srcList) if (!defined $destIndex ) ;

    $srcCount++;
}

map {@$_ = sort ({$a <=> $b} @$_)} @results;

print Dumper \@results;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.