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I've got two UnitTest projects for my Android project. One for the JUnit Test and one for the Android Unit Tests. In the JUnit Test Project I've made a class to access or set private fields, methods or constructors. (PS: For the ones that are curious of the complete code, let me know and I'll add it to the bottom of this post.)

I also have UnitTests to test these private-method accessing. Right now all of these UnitTests work, accept for one: Setting the value of a final static field.

This is the method I use for setting a private field:

// Test method to set a private Field from a class
public static void setPrivateField(Object ob, String fieldName, Object value) throws MyUnitTestException{
    try {
        Field field = ob.getClass().getDeclaredField(fieldName);
        if(field != null){
            field.setAccessible(true);
            if(Modifier.isFinal(field.getModifiers())){
                Field modifierField = Field.class.getDeclaredField("modifiers");
                modifierField.setAccessible(true);
                modifierField.setInt(field, field.getModifiers() & ~Modifier.FINAL);

                /*int modifiers = field.getModifiers();
                Field modifierField = field.getClass().getDeclaredField("modifiers");
                modifiers = modifiers & ~Modifier.FINAL;
                modifierField.setAccessible(true);
                modifierField.setInt(field, modifiers);*/
            }
            // ** IllegalAccessException at the following line with final static fields:
            field.set(ob, value);  // static fields ignore the given Object-parameter
        }
    }
    catch (NoSuchFieldException ex){
        throw new MyUnitTestException(ex);
    }
    catch (IllegalAccessException ex){
        throw new MyUnitTestException(ex);
    }
    catch (IllegalArgumentException ex){
        throw new MyUnitTestException(ex);
    }
}

And this is the UnitTest:

@Test
public void testSetIntFields(){
    MyClass myClassInstance = new MyClass();
    final int value = 5;
    for(int nr = 1; nr <= 4; nr++){
        String nameOfField = "myInt" + nr;

        try {
            TestMethodsClass.setPrivateField(myClassInstance, nameOfField, value);
        }
        catch (MyUnitTestException ex) {
            Assert.fail("setPrivateField caused an Exception: " + ex.getThrownException());
        }

        int x = myClassInstance.getMyInt(nr);

        Assert.assertTrue("myInt " + nr + " should be above 0", x > 0);
        Assert.assertEquals("myInt " + nr + " should equal the set value (" + value + ")", value, x);
    }
}

With the following MyClass:

@SuppressWarnings("unused")
public class MyClass
{
    private int myInt1 = 0;
    private static int myInt2 = 0;
    private final int myInt3 = 0;
    private static final int myInt4 = 0;

    public MyClass(){ }

    public int getInt(int nr){
        switch(nr){
            case 1:
                return myInt1;
            case 2:
                return myInt2;
            case 3:
                return myInt3;
            case 4:
                return myInt4;
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

(And the following MyUnitTestException):

public class MyUnitTestException extends Exception
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    private Throwable thrownException;

    public MyUnitTestException(Throwable ex){
        super(ex);
        thrownException = ex;
    }

    public String getThrownException(){
        if(thrownException != null)
            return thrownException.getClass().getName();
        else
            return null;
    }
}

Setting the value to the fields myInt1, myInt2 and myInt3 works, but at myInt4 I'm getting an IllegalAccessException.

Does anyone know how I should fix this in my setPrivateField method? So it can not only set private, private static and private final fields, but also private static final ones.


EDIT 1:

After reading this article Forbidden Java actions: updating final and static final fields about in-lining at RunTime, I modified my UnitTest to this:

@Test
public void testSetIntFields(){
    MyClass myClassInstance = new MyClass();
    final int value = 5;
    for(int nr = 1; nr <= 4; nr++){
        String nameOfField = "myInt" + nr;

        try {
            TestMethodsClass.setPrivateField(myClassInstance, nameOfField, value);
        }
        catch (MyUnitTestException ex) {
            Assert.fail("setPrivateField caused an Exception: " + ex.getThrownException());
        }

        // Get the set value using reflection
        // WARNING: Since at RunTime in-lining occurs, we never use a Getter to test the set value, but instead use reflection again
        int x = -1;
        try {
            x = (Integer)TestMethodsClass.getPrivateField(myClassInstance, nameOfField);
        }
        catch (MyUnitTestException ex) {
            Assert.fail("getPrivateField caused an Exception: " + ex.getThrownException());
        }

        Assert.assertTrue("myInt " + nr + " should be above 0", x > 0);
        Assert.assertEquals("myInt " + nr + " should equal the set value (" + value + ")", value, x);
    }
}

(And this is my getPrivateField method, which is already completely tested and works):

// Test method to access a private Field from a class
public static Object getPrivateField(Object ob, String fieldName) throws MyUnitTestException{
    Object returnObject = null;
    try {
        Field field = ob.getClass().getDeclaredField(fieldName);
        if(field != null){
            field.setAccessible(true);
            returnObject = field.get(ob); // static fields ignore the given Object-parameter
        }
    }
    catch (NoSuchFieldException ex) {
        throw new MyUnitTestException(ex);
    }
    catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
        throw new MyUnitTestException(ex);
    }
    catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
        throw new MyUnitTestException(ex);
    }
    return returnObject;
}

But I still get the same error.


EDIT 2:

Because I was using a getPrivateField in a UnitTest above it and tested all my UnitTests at the same time, it didn't worked. When I tested the UnitTest above separately it did work.. So I removed the getPrivateField-UnitTests (since in the code above I use both the Set and Get in one test) and now it does work.

I know this is very bad practice for UnitTests, but changing a private static final field during RunTime is already bad practice anyway. I just made the class to get and set private fields, methods and constructors, because I needed it about 3-4 times in some of my UnitTests and then I was just curious how far you can go with reflection and created a TestCase for everything I could think of. (Personally I find it a bit too far though.)

WARNING: Do not use reflection in any other case than tests. I don't recommend using it in your normal project, unless you've tried every other possible way. (I can't even think of a situation where you'd want to use reflection in your project, apart from tests.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A primitive static final field is treated specially.

It is inlined as a constant by the compiler. The final executable does not access the field at runtime anymore.

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1  
If you define a static final boolean DEBUG = false; this even leads to blocks like if (DEBUG) { ... } being thrown away entirely, which can be quite useful when performance is an issue. –  aRestless Jun 6 at 13:15
    
Just came to the same conclusion when I found this article: java-performance.info/updating-final-and-static-final-fields Still, even when I use reflection again to view the set value at in-lining RunTime, I still get the same result. :S –  Kevin Cruijssen Jun 6 at 13:38
    
Because I made the correct code (see edit 1) after learning about in-lining RunTime in the article link I posted above and there isn't really an Answer to my question in the first place (see edit 2), I'll accept your answer as the correct one. –  Kevin Cruijssen Jun 10 at 8:08

A static final field is special-cased in the compiler, as its allowed to be inlined into any method that calls it.

It may not even exist in the end code.

static final int TEN = 10; // removed at compile time

int twenty() {
  return TEN * 2; // compiler will turn this into 10*2 (and then probably 20 directly)
}
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