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I've got a small Rails app with my own engines. Each of the engines is supposed to load a yaml file that should be used by the Rails app. I figured the best way was to use store each gem's yaml file into a constant inside an initializer, which would make those constants and hence the file available to the Rails app. Now I've got more gems which will do the same. Is there a way by which I can initialize an array (as a global I imagine) within the Rails app, that would be accessible by the dependent gems and add those file paths (constant) to the itself. Then I can just iterate over this global instead of having to call each gem's initialized constant. Where exactly would be the best place to place such a constant? It would need to be initialized before gem initialization.

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I put the global in boot.rb, and it does work, but I'm unsure if that's the right way to go forward. In fact, is there an alternative to using the global? – absessive Jun 6 '14 at 15:11
    
The gem FrozenRecord might be helpful for you: github.com/byroot/frozen_record – MrYoshiji Jun 6 '14 at 15:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Take a look at config/application.rb. That file defines a class you can use to set and get custom configuration parameters. Give something like this a try:

# config/application.rb
module MyApp
  class Application < Rails::Application
    config.yaml_stuff = {}
  end
end

# my_plugin/config/initializers/load_yaml_data.rb
MyApp::Application.config.yaml_suff[:my_plugin] = YAML.load_file('whatever.yml')
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