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What is the correct way to return a Void type, when it isn't a primitive? Eg. I currently use null as below.

interface B<E>{ E method(); }

class A implements B<Void>{

    public Void method(){
        // do something
        return null;
    }
}
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1  
what do you need this for? –  Bozho Mar 9 '10 at 11:34
1  
i'm writing an interpreter for a file format, using the interpreter pattern, but some expressions don't have return values –  Robert Mar 9 '10 at 11:36
1  
There's no way to instantiate the Void type, so if you really have to return something of that type, null is your only option. However, you probably don't need the returned value for anything, so null should be fine. –  Jorn Mar 9 '10 at 11:52
    
yeah, that was my logic too - just wondered if there was a more semantic way –  Robert Mar 9 '10 at 11:56
    
I would code it up just like your example. That's a fine approach. –  David Roussel Mar 9 '10 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

The Void class is an uninstantiable placeholder class to hold a reference to the Class object representing the Java keyword void.

So any of the following would suffice:

  • parameterizing with Object and returning new Object() or null
  • parameterizing with Void and returning null
  • parameterizing with a NullObject of yours

You can't make this method void, and anything else returns something. Since that something is ignored, you can return anything.

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2  
then what is the generically correct way to achieve a return type of void? –  Robert Mar 9 '10 at 11:40
    
@Robert see my update –  Bozho Mar 9 '10 at 12:05

There is no generic type which will tell the compiler that a method returns nothing.

I believe the convention is to use Object when inheriting as a type parameter

OR

Propagate the type parameter up and then let users of your class instantiate using Object and assigning the object to a variable typed using a type-wildcard ?:

interface B<E>{ E method(); }

class A<T> implements B<T>{

    public T method(){
        // do something
        return null;
    }
}

A<?> a = new A<Object>();
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1  
is this the convention for setting the return type to void with generics - it doesn't look very void to me? –  Robert Mar 9 '10 at 11:48
    
I believe this is the way to go. Any user of class A<?> will not be able to make any use of the returned value of method(). –  Christopher Oezbek Mar 9 '10 at 11:56

If you just don't need anything as your type, you can use void. This can be used for implementing functions, or actions. You could then do something like this:

interface Action<T> {
    public T execute();
}

abstract class VoidAction implements Action<Void> {
    public Void execute() {
        executeInternal();
        return null;
    }

    abstract void executeInternal();
}

Or you could omit the abstract class, and do the return null in every action that doesn't require a return value yourself.

You could then use those actions like this:

Given a method

private static <T> T executeAction(Action<T> action) {
    return action.execute();
}

you can call it like

String result = executeAction(new Action<String>() {
    @Override
    public String execute() {
        //code here
        return "Return me!";
    }
});

or, for the void action (note that you're not assigning the result to anything)

executeAction(new VoidAction() {
    @Override
    public void executeInternal() {
        //code here
    }
});
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2  
how is this different from what I already have? it still just returns null, like I suggested –  Robert Mar 9 '10 at 11:51
    
Why would you have to return anything else? The point I'm trying to make is you don't need the return value, so it doesn't matter what you return. I tried to clarify that with my edit. –  Jorn Mar 9 '10 at 11:58

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