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Summary

My aim is to control the GPIO pins in Peppermint 4 Linux (Kernel version 3.8.0) on an Intel motherboard (NM70 chipset with C1037U processor).

I'm debugging issues I'm having using the sysfs interface and am trying to understand the conditions where /sys/kernel/debug/gpio would be empty?

When attempting to export pins 0 to 255 by

echo XX > /sys/class/gpio/export

for XX from 0 to 255, I get the following error message

echo: write error: No such device

Under what conditions would /sys/kernel/debug/gpio be empty?

 Background

  • Motherboard: Intel with NM70 chipset
  • Processor: C1037U processor
  • OS: Peppermint 4 Linux
  • Kernel version: 3.8.0
  • GPIO interface: sysfs

I'm attempting to use the sysfs interface, which allows GPIO pins to be accessed from userspace through the filesystem.

I’ve successfully followed the "Alternate Build Method: The Old-Fashioned Debian Way" section of https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Kernel/Compile to recompile the kernel in order to expose GPIO access in user space and to turn on debug mode for GPIO:

Once the new kernel was compiled, I was able to see the GPIO folder in /sys/class/gpio for the first time. Then, in theory, it should be a case of being able to turn GPIO ports ON/OFF by writing to the filesystem. This approach is outlined at http://falsinsoft.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/access-gpio-from-linux-user-space.html.

When attempting to export pins 0 to 255 by

echo XX > /sys/class/gpio/export

for XX from 0 to 255, I get the following error message

echo: write error: No such device

When attempting to export pins outside the range 0 to 255 by

echo XX > /sys/class/gpio/export

I get the following error message

echo: write error: Invalid argument

The tutorial suggests this could be because the GPIO ports are reserved for another program and that, if so, the debug file (/sys/kernel/debug/gpio) would be able to show where they are reserved.

However, /sys/kernel/debug/gpio is empty.

I can see and control the GPIO pins in the BIOS (change pins to be input or output HIGH/LOW).

Related questions

writing to /sys/class/gpio/export failing

Enable pullup GPIO

share|improve this question
2  
I am not too certain of x86 Linux. However, the fact /sys/kernel/debug/gpio is empty, probably means that Linux thinks that you have no GPIOs. Your kernel has to support GPIOs on your hardware. –  artless noise Jun 6 '14 at 19:03
    
How would you go about checking whether your kernel supports GPIO on your hardware? (Opened new question at stackoverflow.com/questions/24146574/…) –  CalumJEadie Jun 10 '14 at 16:48

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