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I have a C# program that has a list that does writes and reads in separate threads. The write is user initiated and can change the data at any random point in time. The read runs in a constant loop. It doesn't matter if the read is missing data in any given loop, as long as the data it does receive is valid and it get's the new data in a future loop.

After considering ConcurrentBag, I settled on using locks for a variety of reasons (simplicity being one of them). After implementing the locks, a coworker mentioned to me that using temporary references to point to the old List in memory would work just as well, but I am concerned about what will happen if the new assignment and the reference assignment would happen at the same time.

Q: Is the temporary reference example below thread safe?

Update: User input provides a list of strings which are used in DoStuff(). You can think of these strings as a definition of constants and as such the strings need to be persisted for future loops. They are not deleted in DoStuff(), only read. UserInputHandler is the only thread that will ever change this list and DoStuff() is the only thread that will ever read from this list. Nothing else has access to it.

Additionally, I am aware of the the Concurrent namespace and have used most of the collections in it in other projects, but, I have chosen not to use them here because of extra code complexity that they add (i.e. ConcurrentBag doesn't have a simple Clear() function, etc.). A simple lock is good enough in this situation. The question is only whether the second example below is thread safe.


Lock

static List<string> constants = new List<string>();

//Thread A
public void UserInputHandler(List<string> userProvidedConstants)
{
    lock(items)
    {
        items.Clear();
        foreach(var constant in userProvidedConstants)
        {
            constants.Add(constant);
        }
    }
}

//Thread B
public void DoStuff()
{
    lock(items)
    {
        //Do read only actions with items here
        foreach(var constant in constants)
        {
            //readonly actions
        }
    }
}

Reference

static List<string> constants = new List<string>();

//Thread A
public void UserInputHandler(List<string> userProvidedConstants)
{
    lock(items)
    {
        items = new List<string>();
        foreach(var constant in userProvidedConstants)
        {
            constants.Add(constant);
        }
    }
}

//Thread B
public void DoStuff()
{
    var constantsReference = constants;

    //Do read only actions with constantsReference here
    foreach(var constant in constantsReference)
    {
        //readonly actions
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Don't lock the collection itself - dedicate a static readonly object for that singular purpose. – Brad M Jun 6 '14 at 18:47
    
if thread b ever gets going before a, you'll get random null reference exceptions – Kevin Cook Jun 6 '14 at 18:48
2  
@BradM The list itself is private, not public, so it can't ever be locked on by any other code, meaning there's no need for a separate object to lock on. If the list were public, or references to it were in some way exposed publicly, then yes, that would be worth doing. – Servy Jun 6 '14 at 18:49
    
@KevinCook: How will you get null reference exceptions when there's nothing in the list? The only way to get null reference exceptions is if somebody added null items to the list. – Jim Mischel Jun 6 '14 at 19:00
1  
This local variable does not guarantee you anything because the JIT can delete it and reuse the field. – usr Jun 6 '14 at 20:50
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is not safe without the lock. Copying the reference to the list doesn't really do anything for you in this context. It's still quite possible for the list that you are currently iterating to be mutated in another thread while you are iterating it, causing all sorts of possible badness.

share|improve this answer
    
I would also lock on an object instead of the list. private object lockMe = new object(); then in lock: lock(lockMe){...} – alykins Jun 6 '14 at 18:48
1  
More specifically, both variables point to the same object. – Xcelled194 Jun 6 '14 at 18:49
    
    
Sorry, just saw that after I posted- Wouldn't it promote 'proper' locking methodologies though? – alykins Jun 6 '14 at 18:51
2  
@alykins The proper methodologies is to lock on objects with as narrow of a scope as is needed for the situation, not that you should never lock on an object that isn't of type object. This is because if you don't know at any given time who might be locking on an object you can create deadlocks, when the scope of the locked object is small it's far easier to reason about the state of the program. Whether the type of the object is object or List<string> or whatever else isn't really relevant. – Servy Jun 6 '14 at 18:54

I think what you're looking for is BlockingCollection. Check out the following link for getting starting using it:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997371%28v=vs.110%29.aspx

Here's an example of using BlockingCollection. ThreadB won't start enumerating the BlockingCollection until there are items available, and when it runs out of items, it will stop enumerating until more items become available (or until the IsCompleted property returns true)

private static readonly BlockingCollection<int> Items = new BlockingCollection<int>();

//ThreadA
public void LoadStuff()
{
    Items.Add(1);
    Items.Add(2);
    Items.Add(3);
}

//ThreadB
public void DoStuff()
{
    foreach (var item in Items.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {
        //Do stuff here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The question makes it rather clear that he's already familiar with the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace, so either he has already ruled out this as a possible option, or he doesn't know how to use it to solve his problem, either way, this answer doesn't really help. – Servy Jun 6 '14 at 19:05
    
The OP stated he had considered ConcurrentBag, but I still think that with the given information BlockingCollection is what we want here... I'll add some code for his reference or any one else's who may stumble here. – mhand Jun 6 '14 at 19:17

Lock Free is dangerous and not portable. Don't do it. If you need to read on how to do lock-free, you probably shouldn't be doing it.

I think I missed understood the question. I under the strange impression that the list was only ever added to or only the most recent version is what matters. No idea how I came to that when he explicitly shows a "clear()" call.

I apologize for the confusion.

This code is being disputed, use at your own risk, but I'm quite sure it should work on x86/x64, but no clue about ARM

You could do something like this

//Suggested to just use volatile instead of memorybarrier
    static volatile T _MyList = new ReadOnlyList<T>();

    void Load(){
    T LocalList = _MyList.Copy();
    LocalList.Add(1);
    LocalList.Add(2);
    LocalList.Add(3);

    _MyList = LocalList.ReadOnly(); //Making it more clear

    }

    DoStuff(){
    T LocalList = _MyList;

    foreach(t tmp in LocalList)
    }

This should work well for heavy read workloads. If you have more than one writer that modifies _MyList, you'll need to figure out a way to synchronize them.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually no, he can't. You have introduced no memory barriers, so the compiler/runtime is allowed to freely re-order these operations, so long as they aren't visible from a single thread. It can actually assign the list to the static variable and allow it to be iterated before it is finished adding items to the list. On top of that, _MyList.Copy() isn't a "safe" operation to perform. Another thread could be modifying that list while you're in the middle of copying it, or it could be grabbing stale data. – Servy Jun 6 '14 at 19:06
    
@Servy When the method returns, it'll flush to memory, at least for x86/x64 it should. I'm pretty sure all stack based languages have to because the registers and stack space are about to be destroyed when the call returns. – Bengie Jun 6 '14 at 19:09
    
@Servy: "_MyList.Copy() ..._MyList.Copy() isn't a "safe" operation to perform. Another thread could be modifying that list ". No threads should EVER modify _MyList in place. Reading from _MyList is thread safe and swapping out _MyList with another already complete list is thread safe, but modifying _MyList will break stuff, which I already addressed. – Bengie Jun 6 '14 at 19:11
1  
The .NET 2.0+ memory model guarantees that all writes have release semantics, so the writes performed when populating the list cannot be reordered past the update to the static field. Servy is correct about the stale read issue: you would need an acquire fence on the consumer side, so you should just drop the explicit barrier and mark the field as volatile. However, I emphatically repeat his advice of avoiding lock-free multi-threaded code. – Mike Strobel Jun 6 '14 at 20:45
2  
Upon further reflection, it's a pretty bad idea to rely on the write-release guarantees of .NET 2.0+ memory model, because (a) it is strictly a runtime model, and there is nothing preventing a C# compiler from reordering the writes; and (b) the .NET 2.0 model is much stronger than that which is described in the ECMA spec. I have no idea if non-Microsoft runtimes (e.g., Mono) implement a similarly strong model, but there's no reason to assume they do. There are many differences between concurrency in theory and in practice, underscoring why lock-free concurrency should be avoided. – Mike Strobel Jun 6 '14 at 21:14

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